kfle

What state is best to own and drive a classic car in?

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55 minutes ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

When driving our cars, we want the exact OPPOSITE of the

wide, fast roads that those rankings favor!

 

Amen. This is the kind of roads I like for my old cars. We have a lot of really good roads like this in Tennessee.

 

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I hope it wasn't Hagerty's accounting department that digested the stats for this report!   I don't think they very carefully read the detail of the VA statute re driving restrictions.  We're free to drive our properly licensed antiques for occasional pleasure use.  I'd also add that it seems when they evaluated roads, they were in rush-hour traffic on I-95 going through Washington DC.  Unfortunately Northern Virginia is always what gets the attention for things like this.  There are enough winding country roads here to keep our MGs happy for a long-time to come.  There are plenty more to be straightened out.

Happy in Va.

Terry

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1 hour ago, mercer09 said:

Most know better and go to their local Triple A for 99% of the DMV related stuff

 

I was on the phone with someone last night from Cali and they said this is no more.

 

can you update if that is true?????????????????????

Hmmmm?

I have no idea why they would tell you this. I deal with my local AAA office regularly without issue.

Greg

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Although New York is ranked 35, Long Island should be counted and ranked separately. Road conditions on L.I. are horrible, just getting off L.I. can take a couple of hours, in standstill or bumper to bumper, 5 mph traffic. Breakdown on the side of one of these roads and you are in serious trouble, the wait for assistance can take hours. Then you have the tolls to get off the Island. I think the Verrazano Bridge is up to $19, just to cross it. Also, the D.M.V. regulations for N.Y. are different for L.I. and the 5 boroughs of NYC. Trying to register an antique car thru the DMV on Long Island can be a nightmare. I have actually been to three different DMV offices, on the same day and received three different requirements to register an antique car.

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I have no experience with other states but I don't agree with their rating for Texas. You can get an Antique registration good for 5 years for any car over 25 years old with no inspection required. Yes there are restrictions on use but I have never been pulled over - anyone scamming the system and using an antique plated car as a daily should be ticketed. Where we live north of Dallas is still on the edge of rural areas with very nice backroad drives nearby but admittedly the sprawl is catching up. Coming from Illinois originally I love being able to drive my cars year round although the summer heat can be restrictive unless you keep the air conditioners operating.

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Tex, I was told chips needs to come out and inspect antiques. That has just happened in the last couple of years. Is that only new registrations on antiques?

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Posted (edited)
On 7/23/2019 at 6:23 AM, charlier said:

Based on comments posted about this ranking on the Hagerty web site, it appears that a number of people pointed out a number of flaws and inconsistencies with how the rankings were determined. Not a big surprise I suppose.

 

I noted errors in their review of Louisiana,

We're far better off than they claim,

and now our sales tax is limited to the first 10K value of the antique vehicle

One-time registration - permanent plate for $25 - make it personalized for an extra one-time $50

No inspection if licensed as an antique

Many other benefits

Drive year-round

Thousands of miles of scenic backroads - many state-desinated as "SCENIC BYWAY"

A Louisiana Tour is a Crooked Line Between Eating Places

if you like to eat, you'll love Louisiana.

During an AACA Divisional Tour some years back, while visiting a sculpture garden, the next-door neighbor docked his skiff, unloaded, and invited all tour participants to share in the hundreds of pounds of shrimp he had just caught and was cooking - typical Cajun Hospitality !!

Edited by Marty Roth
typo (see edit history)
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I live in Georgia and recently registered a 1931 Speedster I purchased.  $32 for a title and a whopping $1 for tax. Gotta love that!

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The best state to own an antique car in is a state of extasy. Zeke01 

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, 46 woodie said:

Although New York is ranked 35, Long Island should be counted and ranked separately. Road conditions on L.I. are horrible, just getting off L.I. can take a couple of hours, in standstill or bumper to bumper, 5 mph traffic. Breakdown on the side of one of these roads and you are in serious trouble, the wait for assistance can take hours. Then you have the tolls to get off the Island. I think the Verrazano Bridge is up to $19, just to cross it. Also, the D.M.V. regulations for N.Y. are different for L.I. and the 5 boroughs of NYC. Trying to register an antique car thru the DMV on Long Island can be a nightmare. I have actually been to three different DMV offices, on the same day and received three different requirements to register an antique car.

 

COULD NOT AGREE MORE! It not just Long Island It is the lower 10 Counties of NY. $19 toll without a trailer, $38 with, plus the Throgs Neck or the Whitestone Bridge tolls. It is over crowded on roads built in the 1930's and 1940's in need of major repair for the last 15 years, good thing we live in the top 10 taxed counties in the United State , that not including the tolls.

I had to go to Queens today, near Kennedy Airport maybe 20-25 miles, it took me 2 1/2  toady at 8AM because the Belt Parkway was flooded, in the same place it flooded since it was built in the early 50's

 

North Central Florida seems like a great place to have cars. 

Edited by John348 (see edit history)
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6 hours ago, Xander Wildeisen said:

I like that there are two #11's, and no #9. Nice to know Idaho has a friend/partner on this list. I would love to see another one done on the best State to own a business in? Anybody want to do that list? Anyone? Bueller, Bueller, Bueller.

 

Some states are tied with others which is why there are several with the same number....

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Posted (edited)

I guess that Hagerty had to come up with a set of criteria for their discussion, but some of them seem more then a little bit arbitrary to me. I guess that I'm the most mystified by the lack of consideration of the quality of touring, instead of just the number of theoretical months that touring can be accomplished. Touring should be a pleasurable experience. When I see temperatures in the ninety degree range, and humidity about the same, that is not enjoyable to me. Theoretically I can do it, but if I lived in part of the country where I've experienced those conditions, I would not subject my car, or my old body to the abuse. Which weather would all of you rather tour in 95/90, or 75/35? 

 

I think that Hagerty takes a much broader view of what a "classic car" is then I do. Touring in a 1923 Pierce Arrow, in really hot weather, is a great deal different then, in my 1993 Lincoln Mark VIII, or an air-conditioned street rod. All probably fall within this umbrella, but it just is not the same.

 

 

Edited by Buffalowed Bill (see edit history)

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Some innacuracies with CT as well.  No annual inspections (yet) and not sure what they mean regarding notarized BOS, which has never been required, to my knowledge unless they mean a vehicle less than 20 years old.

 

Anyway, yeah middle of the road.  CT is a pain in a lot of areas, but the congestion and drivers are the biggest issue for our cars.

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 It is possible to get a title for "undocumented cars" in Ma. by buying a bond and getting a "bonded Title".

 (At least in theory at the wile of the registry)

 

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If a person has a business building/restoring classic cars. Does any State require a business license to do this?

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22 hours ago, mercer09 said:

Tex, I was told chips needs to come out and inspect antiques. That has just happened in the last couple of years. Is that only new registrations on antiques?

 

I have not experienced that and I have newly registered two cars as antiques and converted another from normal plates to antique within the last three years. All this was done very easily at the local DMV office, but I had good titles and bills of sale for all the vehicles. I have heard of the DPS doing inspections of engine numbers and body numbers on older vehicles without VIN's where there were title discrepancies or no title but I have no first hand knowledge.

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Thanks for the link to the article, kfle. Very interesting and informative.

 

My state of Nebraska is ranked very high (as are others in the region) and I think it largely deserves that, but there are some negative points missed by the article. While the state of Nebraska may not salt roads in winter, Omaha and Lincoln (where close to half the state's population resides) sure do.  My 2006 Chrysler T&C even has some rust through. I think the interstate gets salt, too. It wasn't until I got back into collectible old cars 15 years ago that I discovered that some people have an impression of old Nebraska cars being low on rust. Up until that time, I always considered old Nebraska cars to be rust buckets...and half of them are.

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On 7/24/2019 at 12:07 PM, Xander Wildeisen said:

If a person has a business building/restoring classic cars. Does any State require a business license to do this?

 

In Virginia it is up to the locality (city or county [there are NOT the same in our Commonwealth]} to require a business license. 

 

The state tax people talk to the IRS, so if you operate a business and declare it on your 1040, then the state knows and lets the locality know.......😉

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In PA it depends on where you are located. At a minimum you need a license to collect and remit Sales Taxes. No such thing as a statewide Business License. Also antique restoration is different from modern car repair in that the business does not have to provide the customer with a binding estimate. You also have to register your business name with the state if it's fictitious. Bob Smith's Restoration would not need to be registered but Show Quality Restorations would. 

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I think Wisconsin is highly underrated at 26.

I'm nitpicking but only 3 counties in SE Wisconsin pay an additional .1% stadium sales tax.

I still have three cars licensed as COLLECTOR cars for which I will never pay another cent......ever.

Having an ANTIQUE license plate comes with extremely limited permitted usage, specifically going to and from shows, parades and maintenance (wink).

Needless to say when I had my Model T's licensed as antiques they got a LOT of maintenance but my '27 T now carries COLLECTOR plates too.

One can get nearly everywhere via back roads of which there are plenty.

They ARE right about the 7 month driving season though It CAN run into December.

No self respecting collector drives their cars after salt hits the roads and until the roads are salt free again.

We have NO collector car inspections (25 years old or older) or other requirements and, as mentioned, a vehicle without a title is NOT a death knell here any more.

 

 

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Posted (edited)
On 7/23/2019 at 7:27 AM, MCHinson said:

They apparently did not have a way of giving any points for the $500 cap on valuation for computing property tax on antique vehicles in NC.

Matt, you are correct except several counties (Mecklenburg for one) do not honor that law.  They have created requirements over and above the law for the cap to apply. 

Edited by 61polara (see edit history)

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Posted (edited)

Makes sense.  It’s pretty easy here in KY (#2).  I bought an out of state car without a title and had one in less than 30 days with simple paperwork.  My current annual governmental cost of 2 cars is less than $50.  The only down side (which is not in their criteria) is the overall popularity and support of the (very) old car hobby.  Once you get older than muscle cars, seeing anything remotely original is rare.  Likewise, there are few places that can work on them.

Edited by 39BuickEight (see edit history)

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41 minutes ago, 61polara said:

Matt, you are correct except several counties (Mecklenburg for one) do not honor that law.  They have created requirements over and above the law for the cap to apply. 

 

They can't legally do that. New Hanover also likes to ignore the value and require an owner to fill out a form every few years to certify that the car is used for hobby purposes to get that value. As long as you appeal any property tax value over $500 your county will have to abide by the law. I too have had my county send me a bill for the wrong amount and have had to appeal to get it returned to the statutory value.

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23 minutes ago, MCHinson said:

As long as you appeal any property tax value over $500 your county will have to abide by the law. I too have had my county send me a bill for the wrong amount and have had to appeal to get it returned to the statutory value.

Mecklenburg Co. requires a antique tag (which now is not more than a vanity tag in NC) on the vehicle and ask how many times the car was shown in a show in the last year.  They will turn down the appeal if they believe the car was not shown enough times in the past year.  They won't tell you how many times they believe it should be shown, but we have figured out that the number is at least three times based on what has been denied.  There are other questions as well.

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