kfle

What state is best to own and drive a classic car in?

Recommended Posts

Hagerty released this article that ranked all 50 states on how friendly to own and drive a classic car they are.  Interesting read.

 

https://www.hagerty.com/articles-videos/articles/2019/07/18/how-classic-car-friendly-is-your-state?sf105513543=1&fbclid=IwAR3aVjqKHJHA0Iej5O1UQ_EsK1Yb6jerFquKszlV5tc7R5kvkk3EcHi2MUA

 

Do you agree with your state's ranking?

Edited by kfle (see edit history)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Benefits of AACA Membership.

While we certainly have our share of issues here in California, classic cars don't seem to pose much problem And in SoCal we almost never have to worry about inclement weather.

DMV and insurance rates are not prohibitive either.

The only reason I stay is for the sunshine and ultra low humidity!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, GregLaR said:

While we certainly have our share of issues here in California, classic cars don't seem to pose much problem And in SoCal we almost never have to worry about inclement weather.

DMV and insurance rates are not prohibitive either.

The only reason I stay is for the sunshine and ultra low humidity!

I was surprised that California was ranked number 49 as the 2nd worse state to own one!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

NJ is one of the best. no inspection-a one time registration fee that is good forever and the cops dont bother you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, kfle said:

I was surprised that California was ranked number 49 as the 2nd worse state to own one!

 

Have you ever been to a California DMV? There were lots and lots of very long lines when I lived there from 1977-98. Plus you had to get a smog certificate too and a lot of old cars wouldn't pass the test. I have a brother who still lives out there and he's says it's still terrible....

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kentucky is #2. How cool is that? No smog certificates or vehicle inspections plus antique car plates never expire. What's the annual fee you ask? Would you believe 68 cents? That's right-68 cents. And you can drive with them on your car all year long without getting hassled by the cops. Way to go Kentucky!!! :)

 

I forgot to mention that all old cars are considered to have a value of $100 in Kentucky so the total tax is $6. I bought a '70 Chevelle SS396 in 2017 for $51k and I wasn't even asked what I paid for it. The total cost of the antique plates was $85. If I lived in California and told them I paid $51k for it I would have had to pay over $5k for plates.... :o

Edited by Lebowski (see edit history)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think a ranking of 45 for Tennessee is a bunch of bull.  They give TN a grade of 0 for Safety Inspections. I have lived in TN all my life and have never needed to get any kind of inspections done, safety or otherwise, for any car that I've owned, old or new. I think some of the larger cites have inspections but do you give the whole state a grade of 0 because of that?

 

A grade of 50 is ridiculous for registering an antique car as is a grade of 0 for requiring a car to have a title. You pay a one time fee for registering  your antique car and there is no more registering the car for as long as you own it. There are some restrictions on driving but isn't that the way it should be for a classic car? Otherwise it would be a daily driver that should require an annual fee.  Without fees on daily drivers how else are we going to pay for our excellent roads. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, GregLaR said:

While we certainly have our share of issues here in California, classic cars don't seem to pose much problem And in SoCal we almost never have to worry about inclement weather.

DMV and insurance rates are not prohibitive either.

The only reason I stay is for the sunshine and ultra low humidity!

 

4 hours ago, kfle said:

I was surprised that California was ranked number 49 as the 2nd worse state to own one!

 

California is a big state and I think the last two items in their chart, "Road Quality" and "Traffic" depend greatly on where you are. Once you are away from the LA metroplex there is pretty easy access to great touring roads that have low traffic and good quality. This point was driven home to me when I moved from the SF Bay Area (known for horrible commutes) where I could be on a nice back country road in the Santa Cruz Mountains in about 15 minutes. Or, fighting the SF or East Bay, I could be in Marin County or the San Joaquin Valley which had great roads (totally different types) in relatively short order. Now that I'm near the coast in the LA metro area it is a couple of hours slog through horrible traffic to get to nice touring roads. So I'd personally rate LA far lower than the SF Bay area even though they are in the same state. Areas a little inland from LA like Palm Springs, Temecula, Escondido, etc. have good access to nice roads that are less traveled too.

 

2 hours ago, Lebowski said:

 

Have you ever been to a California DMV? There were lots and lots of very long lines when I lived there from 1977-98. Plus you had to get a smog certificate too and a lot of old cars wouldn't pass the test. I have a brother who still lives out there and he's says it's still terrible....

 

I guess I consider any car that needs to be smogged a new car. :)

 

The DMV is a real pain in the arse but I've only had to go there twice in the last 30 years. Once to get YOM tags for my Plymouth and the other more recent time to deal with the Real ID mess. I guess if you are buying and selling cars a lot it would be a bigger deal than it is for me.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can drive straight out to the coast and I will, or could, use the same roads used in the Hitchcock movie "The Birds" winding through hills or along the coastline. Driving around my local town or the freeway, on the other hand, is joyless, flat, traffic congested.

 

We have a 9.5% sales tax which applies to used car purchases as well. So if I bought a classic car for $20k there would be $2k tax plus lots of DMV fees for title transfer registration.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Smog certificate in California?  I've never had to get a smog certificate for my 48 DeSoto.  I think cars older than a certain year are exempted.  I forgot what that year is.  Maybe 1970?  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, marcapra said:

Smog certificate in California?  I've never had to get a smog certificate for my 48 DeSoto.  I think cars older than a certain year are exempted.  I forgot what that year is.  Maybe 1970?  

1976 and newer cars and light trucks require biennial smog tests and certifications, but the law allows a reach-back to about 1967 or 1968 if a geographic area's smog reaches a certain level.  To my knowledge, that provision has never been invoked.  There WAS a rolling 30-year exemption (i.e., 30 yrs old does not require smog tests) until about 2006, when the "rolling 30" was revoked. 

 

Drat!  I had a gray-market 1981 MBz 280SL with 1983 Californication mods which barely passed every year, and I was hanging on hoping for the rolling 30 which would have occurred in 2011--but that got done away with....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, I don't know why they hit California so hard on that list. As Ply33 said, it's a pretty big state at 850 miles from end to end, so it's difficult to compare it all as one encompassing area. No safety inspections, ever. And, as mentioned, no smog unless your car is 1976 or newer. Also DMV is a place you NEVER have to visit unless you're registering YOM plates or renewing your DL. Most know better and go to their local Triple A for 99% of the DMV related stuff. Plus you pay tax only on declared sale price, not on any "price guides" like some other states force buyers to do. Now THAT is down right criminal.

Edited by GregLaR (see edit history)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mass was the worst........AND add in costs for a tow rig and trailer.....it’s asinine. Moving out saved me 3k a year in registration fees, inspection fees, and excise tax. I don’t miss it. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Based on comments posted about this ranking on the Hagerty web site, it appears that a number of people pointed out a number of flaws and inconsistencies with how the rankings were determined. Not a big surprise I suppose.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They obviously misread the North Carolina General Statues. They say that antique vehicles are required to have a safety inspection in NC. Cars that are 35 years old or older are exempt from inspection in NC. There is also a bill currently pending to change the definition of antique automobiles from 35 years old to 25 years old in NC. That other 100 points would have made NC come in closer to where it should have been on their ranking. They also counted against NC for having property taxes on antique cars. They apparently did not have a way of giving any points for the $500 cap on valuation for computing property tax on antique vehicles in NC.

 

Any survey like this is bound to have errors and gray areas that don't compare well with other states. I think it is best to not be too concerned about this type of ranking.  

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

NYS is listed as a "0" for safety check and every car must have a safety check, which living in Florida 1/2 the year that does not have safety checks, I have seen some pretty shaky stuff driving around the sunshine state that SHOULD not be on the road anywhere and posses a danger to pedestrians, drivers new cars and our cherished pieces of history. While we keep up on our vehicles there is a large portion of Americans  that treat their car like a refrigerator on wheels, looking to avoid any expense, fix it with duct tape to hope to get another year out of it.... 

They list the roads in NYS as Fair? I am hitting the same potholes for 25 years, and a lot them!  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

MSRA had a large part in making MN #1.

Except for those winter months doncha know.

 

Mark

Edited by Mark I (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think that list says more about Haggerty's definition of "classic" than it does about the headaches of owning an old car. I reading it over, most of the issues concern what are, to me at least, modern cars - just older ones.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most know better and go to their local Triple A for 99% of the DMV related stuff

 

I was on the phone with someone last night from Cali and they said this is no more.

 

can you update if that is true?????????????????????

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, mercer09 said:

Most know better and go to their local Triple A for 99% of the DMV related stuff

 

I was on the phone with someone last night from Cali and they said this is no more.

 

can you update if that is true?????????????????????

I use AAA for transfer IF the car is currently registered, and most recently used them to get Horseless Carriage plates to replace YOM.  (WHAT?  Well, with YOM plates you pay the full ad valorem every year based on your sworn purchase price vs. a flat $2 ad valorem for HC and Historic Vehicle (HV--post 1922) plates.)  One that car, my most expensive one by far, one year's registration would have been $959 if I kept the YOM plates vs. $103 with HC plates.  (I do run the YOM plates for certain tours, though.)  For difficult issues, sadly you have to go to DMV.  I've learned for the sake of my blood pressure and mental health to use an expediter and pay their fee, rather than undergo the DMV colonoscopy-without-anesthesia.

 

The DMV employees in the AAA offices are MUCH nicer to deal with than those in the DMV field offices, and are probably selected partially on the basis of their PR skills.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For Hagerty's ranking of "Road Quality and Traffic,"

they use U. S. News and World Report's rankings.

Those rankings judge "commute time, road quality,

bridge quality, and public transit usage."

Those rankings may be fine for everyday commuting,

but they're not a good measure for driving antique cars.

 

A state will rank high if it has plenty of wide,

multi-lane highways to accommodate urban traffic.

It will rank high if the bridges are new and wide and

accommodate high speeds and tractor-trailer weight limits.

 

But Pennsylvania and other rural states also have plenty of

winding, narrow roads.  Some bridges might date from the

Civil War or be picturesque trusses from 1900 and not

accommodate tractor trailer loads.  Not everyone wants

to zoom at 65 m.p.h. every time he goes on an outing!

Such relaxing, peaceful scenery makes it especially

enjoyable to meander through the fields and woods,

driving an old car.

 

When driving our cars, we want the exact OPPOSITE of the

wide, fast roads that those rankings favor!

 

 

Car Club Summer Tour 2015 (8).JPG

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Grimy said:

1976 and newer cars and light trucks require biennial smog tests and certifications, but the law allows a reach-back to about 1967 or 1968 if a geographic area's smog reaches a certain level.  To my knowledge, that provision has never been invoked.  There WAS a rolling 30-year exemption (i.e., 30 yrs old does not require smog tests) until about 2006, when the "rolling 30" was revoked. 

 

Drat!  I had a gray-market 1981 MBz 280SL with 1983 Californication mods which barely passed every year, and I was hanging on hoping for the rolling 30 which would have occurred in 2011--but that got done away with....

California; no emission testing of cars before 1975, However vehicles with exhaust emission controls ( 1966-1975 ) must have all their emission controls on the vehicle and in working order because the state can bring those vehicle back into the emission testing program ( actually technically they are in the program, but are inactive ) at any time without a state referendum. A few ways they can be brought into activity are California Air resources  board, Bureau of Automotive repair, AQMD ( air quality management district ). So if air quality gets worse, or California can't meet it's self imposed Carbon offset requirements then the cars of 1966-1975 can be brought back into the system at anytime.

California roads are terrible and is growing worse by the day because road highway taxes and gas taxes have been diverted for other needs ( like the Fed has done with Social Security), uninsured motorist problem is huge, driver competency is terrible and exacerbated by the uninsured people on the road.

 

California registration example; When I moved from California to Arizona I brought five antique cars and two daily drivers. The newest of my cars at the time was a 2012. That 2012 car in California for one year cost me more than the same 2012 car in Arizona plus the other  six cars combined and get this.....ALL registered for FIVE years.

FYI; in Arizona they emission test back to 1967, however certain counties are exempt and also cars with historical, or antique  plates, are exempt from testing.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like that there are two #11's, and no #9. Nice to know Idaho has a friend/partner on this list. I would love to see another one done on the best State to own a business in? Anybody want to do that list? Anyone? Bueller, Bueller, Bueller.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now