STuTZ693

Identify Car in Photo

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Hello All,

Can anyone identify the car in this 1924 photo taken in São Paulo Brazil ?

Thank You

Dan

1924 São Paulo Brazil Photo.jpg

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Tempted to say 1915 Buick C55 7 passenger touring with accessory wire wheels.....

 

Frank

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Hi Frank,

I believe you are correct.  Where the wire wheels a factory option?

They look a little light weight for the men in the car.

Thank you very much for the reply.

 

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I think you will find that this is a 1916/'17 Studebaker ED-6 seven passenger. This car has stamped crowned fenders. Buick in '15 and I believe '16 still had flatter style rolled and beaded fenders. Studebaker started putting stamped fenders on the six cylinder cars in 1914, one of the first major manufacturers to do so. There were several really low production cars that used smooth formed fenders a few years earlier, but those fenders were largely hand made over wooden forms. It should be noted that one of the other earliest cars with smooth fenders was Pierce Arrow, also about 1914.

A long-time good friend of mine has a '15 Buick (the big one, C-55?), as do a few other friends as well. I used to have a 1915 Studebaker ED-6 similar to this one, but with wooden wheels.

I am not sure about Buick in those years, but I don't think wire wheels were offered from the factory, yet. I am fairly sure Studebaker did offer wire wheels at least by 1917, and I think '16. Note, Studebaker did not use "year models" in those years, preferring to refer to the cars by a "series" number instead. This car could be either a series 17 (mostly manufactured during 1916), or a series 18 (mostly manufactured in 1917). This car cannot be a 1915 built series 16 because I can see the gasoline tank in the frame at the back of the body, and the radiator splash apron in the front. Both of those features came out with the introduction of the series 17 beginning late in December 1915.

 

Wonderful photo! Thank you for posting it.

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I agree with Wayne Sheldon that this is definitely a Studebaker six cylinder and if it has the petrol tank at the rear it is either a Series 17 or 18 and the years mentioned by Wayne.  The little rectangular plate in the splash panel to grease the rear springs below the rear door is a good Studebaker identifier.  From looking at many photos and images of these vehicles I have never seen one with wire wheels.  I understand they did offer wire wheels (Houk from memory) but only on vehicles after these models when they did away with the transaxle.  Pity the rear mudguard end obscures the spring arrangement as it does not look (from what I can see) like the three quarter elliptic set up used on the Series 17 and 18.

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To all,

Thank you for the replies.  There is a great wealth of knowledge in the old car hobby.

The car in the photo is right hand drive.  Did Studebaker export RH drive cars?  The top of the doors and the head lights point to a Studebaker.

The photo was emailed to me by a gentleman from San Paulo Brazil.  One or more of the gentlemen in the car is a relative of a friend of his.  His friend found the photo along with an invoice for a new STuTZ car.  They were wondering if the car in the photo was a STuTZ.  I told them it was not a STuTZ but I would try to find out what the car was.

 

 

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9 hours ago, STuTZ693 said:

Did Studebaker export RH drive cars? 

 

A lot of old pictures like tintype are reverse negative. In other words backwards.

 

-Ron

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I don't see any detail that can clearly say the photo is or isn't reversed. I am not certain about those mid '10s years, but most years, Studebaker did export cars with right hand drive to countries that preferred them that way. Been quite a few years, but I seem to recall a mid '10s Studebaker that was an export model and right hand drive. I know they were doing that by the early '20s, because I have followed some restorations being done in Australia and New Zealand of right hand drive cars.

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48Firetruck, Great detective work on the photo.  Thank you

8E45E,  Thank you for the photos.

 

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Hi 8E45E, thanks for the archives link. I have poked around it in the but never for Studebakers. I found this great New Westminster shot. With a Model T Ford speedster at the end of the row.  I wonder where it ended up ?

 

Greg in Canada

7618019a-d8e6-41a0-a9af-fba7effee594-A17627.jpg

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)

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7 hours ago, 8E45E said:

From the 1917 Vancouver Auto show

Interesting to see the spare wheels have no tires on them.

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SOP in North America at that time.  Spare rim, tire, tube and flap were considered accessories as were bumpers.

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Right hand drive cars were normal in South America before World War II. Left hand drive became standard after the war.

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