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RivCat

'64 help - separation of rear driveshaft flange from pumpkin flange n

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Removing driveshaft (DS) from car so I can pull the transmission.  I've marked the DS flange to the pumpkin flange and removed the four bolts, however the DS flange doesn't want to budge from the pumpkin flange.  I removed the two bolts holding the center DS carrier and the DS now has a little up & down play.  Is the DS flange simply rusted in place to the pumpkin flange?  I've whacked it a couple times with the hammer, but nothing has moved loose.   

 

Pg 5-93 of the Buick Chassis service manual simply says "disconnect propeller shaft or rear companion flange, mark flange and shaft so they can be reassembled in same relative position..."

 

Like I say, i've got the four bolts out, what is holding these two flanges to each other?

 

DSrearFlange.thumb.jpg.8fc660da781ffb55a51dabb7954c8933.jpg

 

Thanks,

David

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Posted (edited)

The pinion flange has a raised shoulder that fits into a counterbore on the driveshaft. you can see in your pic where the casting is belled out for the shoulder. Typically they'll get tight in this area because its a snug fit to begin with before the oxidation factor. Keep it soaked with penetrating oil. Get a stout pry tool in the hole shown in pic and pry outward and once you get it to move keep on it with penetrant and moving back and forth and you're home.  If necessary apply Heat, cool, heat, cool cycles but if you aren't replacing the pinion seal be careful not to get it too hot.  Best to use an oxy acetylene torch so you can direct high heat belled area to heat it quickly then let cool so not as much heat soaks into the adjoining areas with rubber parts including the u-joint

Edited by JZRIV (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, JZRIV said:

The pinion flange has a raised shoulder that fits into a counterbore on the driveshaft. you can see in your pic where the casting is belled out for the shoulder. Typically they'll get tight in this area because its a snug fit to begin with before the oxidation factor. Keep it soaked with penetrating oil. Get a stout pry tool in the hole shown in pic and pry outward and once you get it to move keep on it with penetrant and moving back and forth and you're home.  If necessary apply Heat, cool, heat, cool cycles but if you aren't replacing the pinion seal be careful not to get it too hot.  Best to use an oxy acetylene torch so you can direct high heat belled area to heat it quickly then let cool so not as much heat soaks into the adjoining areas with rubber parts including the u-joint

 

Jason,

 

Thanks much for the info.  A cold chisel and hammer got it moving.  Just kept working my way around and it eventually separated.

Posting a few pic's so when the next first time Rivi like me gets in this situation, they'll have a couple reference pictures.

 

Flange on the differential

679672305_pumpkinflange.jpg.92edde701f3744a63b90c8b4c67f56fe.jpg

 

Flange on the drive shaft

 

689246357_DSflange.jpg.abedb642bfb8d8560a580e7594041156.jpg

 

And here's the section of drive shaft you can't see in the tube portion of the frame

 

1181430823_DSmiddlejoint.jpg.1f9c75a7ce54f8593e163d07a923b4cb.jpg

 

A couple hours in and I'm realizing this car is just a bit different from my Camaro and El Camino ;)

 

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Yeah it's nothing like my 55 Bel Air , it is a bit like my 61 Cadillac Hearse as far as build quality goes and the way it is put together. 

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A friend of mine, the guy from whom I bought my 65, has a 1960 Cadillac limo.  He talks about two things. 1) How well put togerher it is, and 2) how difficult it is to work on.  Dual a/c units both of which can be controlled by the passenger.  Dual radio controls.  The sliding glass petition in the "unmovable" front bench seat.  Two kind of upholstery; leather in the driver's compartment and a fine cloth in the back.  He loves it though. Especially when he puts on his little black cap and takes all the neighborhood kids through the drive-through at the Dairy Queen.

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Just get out a tape measure and start adding up how many inches of welds there are in a Riviera X-frame. A guy about 3 miles from me had the frame out from under his '64 Impala when I had the frame out of my Riviera. He went home shuttering.

 

In the early 1970's you could use a bumper jack on the rear of a Chevy and fold the quarter panels just aft of the rear window, not on a Buick, though.

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RivCat - I'll bet you were quite surprised as I was when you saw your Riviera had 5 u-joints.  I have ask many car guys the question of how many a Riviera has and not one has yet been able to guess it correctly.  Goes to show how lucky we are to learn something every day.

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You will also want to check the condition of the center support bearing and rubber mount. If its original you'll probably want to replace it. The rubber dries out, cracks and separates from the mount. And replace rear trannny mount too. Cha ching cha ching

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21 hours ago, RivNut said:

A friend of mine, the guy from whom I bought my 65, has a 1960 Cadillac limo.  He talks about two things. 1) How well put togerher it is, and 2) how difficult it is to work on.  Dual a/c units both of which can be controlled by the passenger.  Dual radio controls.  The sliding glass petition in the "unmovable" front bench seat.  Two kind of upholstery; leather in the driver's compartment and a fine cloth in the back.  He loves it though. Especially when he puts on his little black cap and takes all the neighborhood kids through the drive-through at the Dairy Queen.

They are very well built, doors shut like a bank vault. It took me 4 years to find a good used rear brake drum removal tool for the hearse at the cost of 150 on ebay. Even the local drive line shops were unable to remove the brake drum they didnt have the proper tools. Very well built, like the Riviera! 

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59 minutes ago, Hearse said:

It took me 4 years to find a good used rear brake drum removal tool for the hearse at the cost of 150 on ebay.

 

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Yeah I tried different variations of pullers, tools, chains lol..Wasn't happening, not on a tapered drilled splined 3.0 shaft that hasn't had the brake drum removed since the car was assembled. 

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As bad as having a flat on an Austin Healey 100-6 when the tube blows and the tire goes flat immediately.  The splines on the hub somehow weld themselves to the splines on the wheels.  Takes a big hammer to get the knock-off off then the car sits so low you can't get the jack under it.  It turns dark and you're sitting on the shoulder on the Interstate.  If I would have been next to a creek or if I would have had a stick of dynamite, that car would have never come back home.  Otherwise it was the most fun car to drive I've ever owned.

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On 7/18/2019 at 3:04 PM, RivCat said:

A cold chisel and hammer got it moving.  Just kept working my way around and it eventually separated.

 

I just had mine out to replace a couple of U-joints.  My flange was pretty clean, however, so It separated without too much fuss.  Even so, I slathered the interface with anti-seize paste before I reattached the driveshaft to the axle flange (for next time)...  ;)

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Riv Nut, reminds me of our old Triumph Spitfire a 1975, when it did run, it was fun, but the lucas electronics and weak engineering of everything else was horrid, it was about to get a 302 Ford Swap and a c4 trans until I saw what an abortion the rear end situation was on those cars, sold it ASAP. 

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On the brake drums, there is a tool:

001.thumb.JPG.d2f85b63bf058cd553c084130696e5b2.JPG

002.thumb.JPG.8d0548683de7ec508ff01b772b2c4928.JPG

 

If you have one of those hanging over the bench you can pretty much bet the drum will just fall off the hub.

Bernie

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On 7/20/2019 at 10:21 AM, 60FlatTop said:

On the brake drums, there is a tool:

001.thumb.JPG.d2f85b63bf058cd553c084130696e5b2.JPG

002.thumb.JPG.8d0548683de7ec508ff01b772b2c4928.JPG

 

If you have one of those hanging over the bench you can pretty much bet the drum will just fall off the hub.

Bernie

 

If anyone is interested in finding one of these pullers it is a K-D 2271.

Bernie

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This is the correct tool for removing the splined brake drum from a commercial chassis Cadillac circa 1960. An old Ken Tool . 

IMG_20190727_123414.jpg

IMG_20190727_123420 (1).jpg

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