carbking

Stromberg carburetor information desired

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Posted (edited)

Continuing research into the surviving Stromberg documents.

 

The following brass carburetor TYPES are listed in the parts indexes, but there is no record of their application. These would all be earlier than 1920. If anyone has one of these Stromberg carburetor types, and a factory parts book, owners manual, shop manual, etc. showing either application or parts break-down, I would like to acquire copies.

 

Types are:

 

E (I know these were used on early Stearns, but no documentation)

F (believe to be experimental only, not certain)

GA

GB

GC

GE (believe to be experimental only, not certain)

HA

HC

SK

 

The Stromberg application database currently stands at 11,327 different carburetors. I still add 1 or 2 each month as I check additional documents.

 

EDIT: I should have mentioned that all of these are UPDRAFT carburetors. The E was reused in the early 1930's as a downdraft type.

 

Thanks in advance.

 

Jon 

Edited by carbking (see edit history)

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I was just looking for information on my Stromberg carb this weekend.  I have a 1913 Cole and it uses a specific Stromberg Carb that was built to Cole's specs.  It says it is the model 'G'.  Is the Cole-Stromberg model G different than the GA, GB, or GC that you listed above or is the A, B, and C, versions of the G carb?  66617705_2268341273428472_15414699429923

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Thanks for replying. My records show that Cole used mostly Schebler up to 1913, and in 1913 started the switch to Stromberg, beginning with the 6 cylinder. I do not have the number following the GNo on your carb. If you would post, I would appreciate it.

 

The models G and variants are different, but similar.

 

The first letter (in this case G) represents the main type.

 

The second letter (such as the "A" in GA) would represent a variation.

 

On the early carbs, the two letters No would follow the last model letter, and is "Strombergese" for "number".

 

There would be a number following the last letter which would represent the S.A.E. flange size (example - GNo3 - read G number 3).

 

Since I don't have information on the variants of the G (I do have information on the G itself), I cannot tell you what the second letter means. However, if we take a slightly newer model, the model M; basic model was M which is a brass updraft carburetor. Variants were MB (sidedraft), MD (sidedraft originally aftermarket for Dodge Brothers, but released as aftermarket for some additional makes), and MP (original to certain models of Pierce-Arrow trucks).

 

Jon.

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7 minutes ago, carbking said:

Thanks for replying. My records show that Cole used mostly Schebler up to 1913, and in 1913 started the switch to Stromberg, beginning with the 6 cylinder. I do not have the number following the GNo on your carb. If you would post, I would appreciate it.

 

The models G and variants are different, but similar.

 

The first letter (in this case G) represents the main type.

 

The second letter (such as the "A" in GA) would represent a variation.

 

On the early carbs, the two letters No would follow the last model letter, and is "Strombergese" for "number".

 

There would be a number following the last letter which would represent the S.A.E. flange size (example - GNo3 - read G number 3).

 

Since I don't have information on the variants of the G (I do have information on the G itself), I cannot tell you what the second letter means. However, if we take a slightly newer model, the model M; basic model was M which is a brass updraft carburetor. Variants were MB (sidedraft), MD (sidedraft originally aftermarket for Dodge Brothers, but released as aftermarket for some additional makes), and MP (original to certain models of Pierce-Arrow trucks).

 

Jon.

It will be a few days before I am with the car again so I can take some pictures and look at the specific information for you. 

 

Thanks!

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Posted (edited)

Hi Jon, 

 

let me know if you have any interest in these and I'll hunt down more for you. Note the spelling is Carbureter

 

http://www.freepatentsonline.com/1224088.pdf

 

http://www.freepatentsonline.com/1177318.pdf

 

http://www.freepatentsonline.com/1128773.pdf

 

Dave

Edited by 30DodgePanel (see edit history)

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Here is my Stromberg for my 29 Dodge Bros.

l believe Tom Meyers of Meyers Parts rebuilds Stromberg carbs .

 

746DA06B-B306-4909-8247-1CA151039565.thumb.jpeg.89cb91e700e6a1db93fe643e51383c75.jpeg88EF278F-B0B8-4265-BB82-8E0BCAB041D8.thumb.jpeg.fbc05aa4b6367271d6b133933caa6ea0.jpeg

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Dave - thanks for posting the Goldberg patent information. Somewhere on this forum, there is a thread about the Goldberg.

 

Stakeside - your "Stromberg" is actually a Stewart, made by the Detroit Lubricator Company. It was produced in October 1928 for the 1929 model year. LOCK YOUR HOOD!!!!!

 

Lots of folks would like to have this carburetor! Some might even think about a "five-finger discount" ;)

 

Jon.

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On 7/17/2019 at 1:38 PM, carbking said:

Thanks for replying. My records show that Cole used mostly Schebler up to 1913, and in 1913 started the switch to Stromberg, beginning with the 6 cylinder. I do not have the number following the GNo on your carb. If you would post, I would appreciate it.

 

The models G and variants are different, but similar.

 

The first letter (in this case G) represents the main type.

 

The second letter (such as the "A" in GA) would represent a variation.

 

On the early carbs, the two letters No would follow the last model letter, and is "Strombergese" for "number".

 

There would be a number following the last letter which would represent the S.A.E. flange size (example - GNo3 - read G number 3).

 

Since I don't have information on the variants of the G (I do have information on the G itself), I cannot tell you what the second letter means. However, if we take a slightly newer model, the model M; basic model was M which is a brass updraft carburetor. Variants were MB (sidedraft), MD (sidedraft originally aftermarket for Dodge Brothers, but released as aftermarket for some additional makes), and MP (original to certain models of Pierce-Arrow trucks).

 

Jon.

Here is my 1913 Cole Carb and number.  

5A591358-25D1-41F9-88D2-0929AAC35E42.jpeg

3E0622D0-7EA7-4190-B15B-6AC0AE3FEB77.jpeg

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I have a 1910 Russell (Canadian built) with Knight engine.  The engine was built by Daimler in England.  It has a Stromberg C No2 carb and I'd be interested to know anything about adjusting it.  I've been reluctant to fiddle with it because  the car starts and runs extremely well, but I would like to lean it out a little.

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The nut on the bottom of the air valve is the low speed adjustment - up is lean, down is rich.

 

The nut at the top of the air valve is the high speed adjustment. The suggested adjustment (assuming the correct air valve needle) is that the nut should be 3/32 inch above the lever.

 

Jon.

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Found this in my latest issue of “Vintage Truck” mag.

This is a Jackson truck with the Continental engine and it has the Model M Stromberg Carb.

BE2544C8-ECEA-4FB6-A2DB-B33B9527E166.thumb.jpeg.90c866623fc40ec9791c5f3401afb23b.jpeg

 

668C0E32-1BC6-4BCA-862C-0282888293C3.thumb.jpeg.9d3358e71f6df248293612db2906c073.jpeg 

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