Jump to content

1924 buick Master 6 open car new project new guy here.


Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

Thank you guys for move my thread to this section of the pre war technical section .

And for all of you new guys that have not seen this , here i'm trying with the help of good guys from the forum  to finish my 1924 Buick 45 open car.

i consider my self very lucky on acquiring this car in great condition for its age.., also the wood part is very strait and solid on my car .

i have meat a new young nice guy today near my place  that's working on a 1928 standard 4 door car and there doing the complete wood work on this guy ..!

OMG  what a job..!  my respects to them on this project...

well i was supposed to find them a  thread here where there's one fellow that was making or had the roof section  drawings for  the standard cars .? or so.

if anybody has that .. i remembered seen it  but can't remember where.

thank you guys ..

Cheers 

Apolo.

 

Edited by apolo1100 (see edit history)
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

ok for the first post on the new section ... here i have a video of the first time i pull it out to the street on his own ..!

but unfortunately at the end of the video you will see or hear something i was not aware of..

one tire was low on air , and upon steping on the brakes.. one wheel snap of it's place and cut off the vale stem  on the tire tube.

Dam. it.. i have to go and get a new one tomorrow at Lucas tires in Long Beach...ohh whell.!!  inexperience guys have to pay to learn this things..

Also the shifting pattern was not like my 29 buick and you can clearly heard that i was moving it in 3rd gear..!

now i know is a reverse H pattern ..

well this was a short drive .. but will try again soon ..

here is the video link

.https://youtu.be/_ro9iUoN4jY

 

 

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

Very Cool! Yes the shift pattern is a backward H. I have 2 1912 Buicks that have that pattern. A good friend has a 1928 Master Phaeton that has the normal H Pattern. Rode last fall in 1926 Buick in Ridgeway, Colorado that is a replica of the first “Galloping Goose” on the Rio Grande Southern Railroad at their Musuem Grounds were they had put down a half mile circle track. It was a backwards H pattern. I have been told 1928 was the first year for normal H pattern with Buick.

 

Tom Muth

Cincinnati, Ohio 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Apolo, 

      I have created all the wood drawings - full size (except the doors) for a 1925 Buick Standard Touring model 25.   The Touring bodies were made by Buick.   The sedans were made by Fischer Body.  Several guys have rebuilt their sedan tops but I have not seen any wood drawings for those cars.  The body wood is similar construction on the cars, but not the same as mine.   The top are completely different.    Hugh

Link to post
Share on other sites

today i run over Lucas tire to get the replacement for the tire tube i busted last week..

i'll gett the second run maybe on friday..

whats the proper tire pressure for those 33x4 1/2 tires .?

Thanks.!

20200610_110903.jpg

20200610_110911.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

These 33X4/12 tires are considered High pressure. Check the sidewalls for pressure limits. Should be around 60 lbs. The 1925 were the first with low pressure "Balloon" tires. My dash plate chart shows 28-42 lbs. depending on model. Front or rear mounting.

 The dash plate on the 1924s I don't believe show this info.

814124451_img20170921_12284036(1024x1008).thumb.jpg.99f528d8a2dc3029b41aafeacfeca386.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Apolo, 

    Looks like 60 lbs minimum for non balloon clincher tires.  Check the tire sidewall for max pressure and stay just below that.  More information here.  Be cautious when you see low pressure numbers for cars pre 1925 as they may have substituted low pressure balloon tires for what was on the car originally.   An option for you when you are ready to replace all the tires.    Hugh

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...