Ray Bell

Morris Commercial engine details required - 4-cyl post-war

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I have scoured the internet everywhere looking for details about these engines...

 

0719wlmngtnmorriscommercial1engine.jpg

 

I would like to know the specs on them and also whether they were fitted to other vehicles, cars or tractors. Google only finds pages which are now dead.

 

Seeing as they were replaced by the Austin 2260cc engine, I'd imagine they were about the same size.

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I have to say that I find it amazing that nobody knows anything about this old engine...

 

No clues from anyone?

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Beings as they were built by Morris who is the M in MG I would assume they are similar to MG engines which were used in many cars. 

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5 hours ago, Restorer32 said:

Beings as they were built by Morris who is the M in MG I would assume they are similar to MG engines which were used in many cars. 

 

Sort of but this engine was unique to commercial line as far as I know.

 

Morris-Commercial operated as a separate division of Morris Motors. 

 

The reason for the later use of the Austin engine was that Austin and Morris got together to form BMC in 1952, and the Austin engine was the better choice.

 

I think the UK would be the best place to try for info.

 

You could probably start with the Historic Commercial Vehicle Society -  http://www.hcvs.co.uk/

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Yes, I'm well aware of the changes which took place with the merger...

 

Only the XPAG engine and the Riley engines survived and only for a relatively short time, the XPAG in the Wolseley 4/44 going the longest. Otherwise the range of five basic Austin engines were used in all the cars well into the sixties, and some into the eighties.

 

I will try the HCVS and see how I get on. I am just dumbfounded that there seems to be nothing online anywhere about these engines.

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Now I am told that the LC5 had the same engine at 2.2 litres...

 

Any more information on this one, please?

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I know nothing about these engines, nor do I particularly care to, being unable to keep up with those I am interested in...

That being said, on 7-14 you stated you intended to contact the HCVS in the UK, which one would assume could/would tell you all you needed/wanted to know about your engine...

So, what happened??

My experience with the HCVS/UK  is limited to help with one US engine ID problem some years ago, but I recall them as being both gracious and appreciative, a pleasure to engage with......

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Yes, I did get the information on the 2050cc engine...

 

But it's all seemingly difficult. Dead links etc. It just amazes me that such a thing can be so hard.

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Alan  Murtagh, up the King River valley beyond  Edi, had a small post-war 4 cyl petrol engine Morris Comercial, which seemed fairly complete when I got a Lancia Kappa chassis and axles from him some years ago.  Several years ago I saw a much bigger Morris "Comical" (as they were called by some).  It had survived on a farm.  It had the 6 cylinder 4 litre Saurer diesel engine,  which should have been good.  The crankshaft is massive,  and the rest of the engine with wet sleeve cylinders in aluminium block.  One peculiarity was the pore-less injector tips .  The fuel spray came when the injector pump pressure lifted the tip off the body of the injector.   They originated too far from Sir Harry Rickardo's efficiency and performance, though they may be useful with a whiff of LPG into the intake air, coupled with a turbocharger.   As built they were a very obvious air pollution device.   Otherwise they probably complied with Arthur Lang's descriptive metaphor ----- "like a Railway cup of tea . Big and weak".

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