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1926 Ford Model T Touring updated price


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12 hours ago, wayne sheldon said:

Car-Nicopia,

Just a quick comment from me. Being a long-time early car hobbyist, leaning toward the brass era, but with interests well through the "nickel age" '20s, and some interest in newer collector cars, also passionate about history in general. I have had numerous model Ts, several speedsters (a whole world unto themselves!), a TT truck, a coupe,  a center-door sedan, now restoring a '15 runabout. I study era photos in minute detail. Immerse myself in the minutia of the changes made by Ford, the why, the when. 

The model T Ford is the ultimate icon of mass production, fifteen million made all alike! No two exactly alike.

Yeah, model T Fords are just about the most enjoyment one can get for their dollars.

 

Eric's touring car is one of the finest quality restorations available on the market today. I have not seen it myself, but I know a few people that have.

Wayne,  I really appreciate the comment.  I don't think anyone will be disappointed with the car. Thanks again.

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  • 2 weeks later...

This one is still looking for a good place to live. I have to give a shout out to Matt Harwood who probably could have made some money on this one but instead gave me 30 minutes of his time offering me free advice.  Melanie answered the phone and was a delight as well. Good people there.

Still available is the best open Improved Ford on the market todat. Give me a call and let's go for a drive!

269-four two zero-3852.

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Eric,

Would you mind telling us what percentage the Mark Larder upholstery and top represent of the $18,500 that you are now asking for this still flawless Stynowski winning car?

 

Thanks,

Ben P.

 

forum thread on Mark Larder Auto Upholstery here ⬇️

 

Edited by Ben Perfitt (see edit history)
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One of the nicest tops I've seen on a T, and I know what it takes to make a nice top.  Can't do it with a kit, needs to be custom fit, 60 to 70 hours work minimum. So, the top on this car represents 25-30% of asking price, minimum.

 

I've drive a great Model T.  The difference between the average T and a great one is HUGE.  

 

This car should sell easily, except to those who use price guides and offer 7K, thinking they're so smart to use the guide, and missing the point completely....

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2 hours ago, trimacar said:

One of the nicest tops I've seen on a T, and I know what it takes to make a nice top.  Can't do it with a kit, needs to be custom fit, 60 to 70 hours work minimum. So, the top on this car represents 25-30% of asking price, minimum.

 

I've drive a great Model T.  The difference between the average T and a great one is HUGE.  

 

This car should sell easily, except to those who use price guides and offer 7K, thinking they're so smart to use the guide, and missing the point completely....

To answer the question with 100% honesty I really don't remember the price of the top and interior work, but keep in mind it was done in about 2004 and maintained ever since . The lowball offer of 7K you reference might have covered the cost of the upholstery, but would  only have barely covered it. Then you throw in tires with correct metal stem tubes, engine rebuild, transmission and hogshead machine work and bearings, wiring, steering gear, front and rear axle rebuilds, fresh starter and generator, nickel plating, new glass and...oh, yeah, we still have to put 9 gallons of DuPont Centari on the whole thing at $200 per gallon. Shoot, there was probably $2000 spent in correct nuts, bolts and cotter pins. Thank god I was able to assemble it myself!

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4 hours ago, Ben Perfitt said:

Eric,

Would you mind telling us what percentage the Mark Larder upholstery and top represent of the $18,500 that you are now asking for this still flawless Stynowski winning car?

 

Thanks,

Ben P.

 

forum thread on Mark Larder Auto Upholstery here ⬇️

 

A LOT! See my reply to Trim A Car.

Ben, I still think you need to own this one.

Thanks for the question. 

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2 hours ago, cahartley said:

I imagine this car has been shared at the mtfca forum but have you advertised it there?

In the Model T world  the Stynowski name is tantamount to Picasso.

Yes, I have it advertised there and it is advertised in the Model T Times as well.

I appreciate the Picasso comparison! My car was the first "black era" Model T in a generation to win the Stynoski and it won against a 1910 Town Car; a car with probably a $200000 restoration. I had to go out to my trailer for something before the show judging started and overheard a tour participant commenting about the two cars on the walk back.  Seeing the two in the distance she said "this one is obvious." I thought so too as the Town Car seemed to so outclass my luttle black touring. Believe me; nobody was more surprised than me when my car came out the winner,  nor was anyone else more delighted. Thanks gor your comment 

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  • ericmac changed the title to SOLD* 1926 Ford Model T Touring reduced price

As of this morning this car is sold. It is going to a brand new to the hobby collector who is perhaps just as fastidious as I am with it. He wanted to know if he is too old to join the hobby at age 76. I strongly encouraged him not to look at the hobby that way and to enjoy his youth. Needless to say I am very happy with the new stewardship of this car.

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Hooray!

Some cars choose their owners...

He will be enjoying his youth — and heck, he just gained 10 years by not having to restore it.

I didn’t ask how many years you spent on the restoration Eric. But I figure it would’ve taken me 5-6yrs even not doing the actual work - just farming it out and reassembling everything. It then would have taken at least 4yrs. of all my disposable income to pay for it all. At least. 🙂

Edited by Ben Perfitt
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8 hours ago, Ben Perfitt said:

Hooray!

Some cars choose their owners...

He will be enjoying his youth — and heck, he just gained 10 years by not having to restore it.

I didn’t ask how many years you spent on the restoration Eric. But I figure it would’ve taken me 5-6yrs even not doing the actual work - just farming it out and reassembling everything. It then would have taken at least 4yrs. of all my disposable income to pay for it all. At least. 🙂

I bought the car May 1999 and showed it for the first time June 2005. I was beaten that day by a Duesenberg and a Hispano Suiza, so I didn't feel too bad about the loss. This has been a good run and I will miss having a car of this quality but will enjoy making my 1913 more drivable. Thanks to all of you for your support along the way.

20190713_193503.jpg

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Congrats Eric. 

Just came across this today and didn't realize you were selling.   Kellie and I enjoyed sitting and visiting in the car at Eyes on Design when it decided to downpour.  Someone purchased a great car.  

 

 

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42 minutes ago, Janousek said:

Congrats Eric. 

Just came across this today and didn't realize you were selling.   Kellie and I enjoyed sitting and visiting in the car at Eyes on Design when it decided to downpour.  Someone purchased a great car.  

 

 

Thanks Brad. I have my eye on another real gem but had to free up some funds to make it happen.  Hope to catch up with you and Kellie soon.

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  • ericmac changed the title to SOLD...or NOT* 1926 Ford Model T Touring reduced price

I guess it isn't over until the cash changes hands and the title is signed. The buyer had second thoughts about his ability to maintain the car in the event of some sort of mechanical problem so has elected to reconsider whether or not he wants to buy it. Probably for the best.


In any case the car remains on the market.

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Dang, sorry to hear that Eric. At least he didn't try to throw his wife under the bus instead.

 

It's been my experience that it's always better to not sell a car than to sell one to a guy who is going to be a problem for you in the future. I don't want to be married to someone and his car for the rest of my life and be the first call he makes every time it hiccups. I have been known to cancel deals because my own BS detector goes off and I think the car will be a problem for the buyer. Sometimes it's better this way just to avoid future hassles.

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29 minutes ago, Matt Harwood said:

Dang, sorry to hear that Eric. At least he didn't try to throw his wife under the bus instead.

 

It's been my experience that it's always better to not sell a car than to sell one to a guy who is going to be a problem for you in the future. I don't want to be married to someone and his car for the rest of my life and be the first call he makes every time it hiccups. I have been known to cancel deals because my own BS detector goes off and I think the car will be a problem for the buyer. Sometimes it's better this way just to avoid future hassles.

I think that is exactly what happened here and agree, that I am probably better off not to sell to him than to risk becoming his personal mechanic.

 

As anyone can see, the wheels on the car are apple green (a color Ford inexplicably called Emerald Green), something this buyer knew and saw before coming to look at the car. The prospective buyer's wife did not like them and both of them questioned the authenticity of the wheels and the rest of the car (even though it is an AACA Senior Grand National and MTFCI Stynoski winner). I am not sure they even understood the significance of the awards.  At that point, my BS detector was ringing loud and clear. The message was "they are never going to buy this car with these wheels on it." I should have listened to that ringing. As you have pointed out Matt, I am probably better off.

 

Honestly, this is not a bad car to get stuck with forever so I am not home alone crying in my beer, though it could prevent me from moving to the next project as quickly as  had hoped. I just hope the other car remains available for a while.

Edited by ericmac
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seriously, questioning the authenticity of the car should have been a HUGE red flag and at that very moment, I would have told the prospective buyer,  the car was not available to them.

 

IMHO, the problem with expensive restorations of non classic cars, is, once you take them out of the box, they become a used car. sad part, you have spent so much blood and money to restore a car correctly and yet,  you do not get the well earned respect for this, can we all say "Rodney Dangerfield",

 

If I may suggest, sell it on contract of a year or less, yes, keep the car until it is paid for, remember who your buyer really is, they are not people who have no problem writing a check for 20K, usually you will get far closer to your asking price, if not your asking price and more than likely, you will be paid in full long before you find a buyer at a greatly discounted price, everyone wants a bargain, and no one ever says, I paid the asking price, also, I might add, the best time to sell, is when someone is asking to buy your car. 

 

I will conclude my thoughts, with this, the greatest value in owning a wonderful car like this one,  the smiles per mile are priceless...

Edited by j m davis phd (see edit history)
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3 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

Dang, sorry to hear that Eric. At least he didn't try to throw his wife under the bus instead.

 

 

Matt,

 

I'm certain you've heard a books worth of reasons from people who changed their minds about purchasing one of your cars. How about sharing some of those reasons using your well-written prose.

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16 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

It's been my experience that it's always better to not sell a car than to sell one to a guy who is going to be a problem for you in the future. I don't want to be married to someone and his car for the rest of my life and be the first call he makes every time it hiccups. I have been known to cancel deals because my own BS detector goes off and I think the car will be a problem for the buyer. Sometimes it's better this way just to avoid future hassles.

 

Been there, done that. I have very rarely sold an antique car because I wanted to. Never because I was "tired of it" or "I need the garage space". Usually, family needs jumped up and money was needed NOW. Usually, I end up selling too cheap because I need the money. Often to someone looking for a bargain, and something to put "their universe in order". Several of those buyers truly became a P I T A because they didn't understand what they were doing. One consulted his "machinist buddy" who convinced him the hundred year old car was total junk just because everything wasn't built to a one thousandth inch spec! I won't go into a few other complaints.

 

Eric, I am saddened the deal didn't work out, but as others have said, it is probably for the best. I do hope you can work out a way to go forward with your hopeful new project.

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This car is a beauty. I would love to own it. Yet I have other cars and no more space. The discussions around here lately about this period of cars is certainly interesting. The cost to restore many cars has exceeded what the market will bear it seems. Even if you do the work yourself.  In many instances parts, shipping costs, etc seem to total up to be more than its final sell price, for an  average car. It's unfortunate as fewer and fewer cars will be restored in the future I fear.  This Model T would be great in the hands of an average back yard mechanic who is a vintage car lover. Doing your own repairs on it would be very rewarding and not difficult. Patience will be needed to sell it, it seems. There is a buyer out there somewhere. At what price? It's hard to know. Good luck with the sale. If I win the lottery tonite I'll be in touch. - K

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2 hours ago, keithb7 said:

The cost to restore many cars has exceeded what the market will bear it seems. Even if you do the work yourself. 

 

I'm working on a '26 T at the moment and I'll have more into it than its worth all the while doing the bulk of the work myself, just the way it is at my place for most of the cars I've ever worked on. I never add up the receipts, don't want to know, lol. 

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5 hours ago, Lahti35 said:

 

 

I'm working on a '26 T at the moment and I'll have more into it than its worth all the while doing the bulk of the work myself, just the way it is at my place for most of the cars I've ever worked on. I never add up the receipts, don't want to know, lol. 

I kept track of the restoration but none of the ongoing repairs or routine maintenance.  I know what I spent initially which was a lot closer to 50K than I like to admit.  A Model T, like any car, has to be restored because of the love of the car and not for a financial benefit.  The numbers just don't work otherwise. 

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1 hour ago, ericmac said:

True,  but for that price you couldn't take one of those cars and turn it into my car. Paint alone would have you better off buying mine.

Exactly. You can’t compare auctions to real life buyer/seller transactions anyway.  “If you want to buy a car at an auction, then why are you looking at mine?”  Two completely different arenas.

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12 hours ago, ericmac said:

True,  but for that price you couldn't take one of those cars and turn it into my car. Paint alone would have you better off buying mine.

Paint?

I’m thinking of that Mark Larder top + interior. Seriously guys, just go take a look, then compare those two lone items to those in the next Stynoski winning T — and I’m dead certain they won’t compare.
This is the only T in the world that can stand next to a Duesenberg and a Hispano Suiza and not look out of place.

I’m still thinking about a Larder top for my ‘18 Buick touring... So if my posts here come to a sudden stop and an obit turns up you’ll know I went down and got that top — I’ll have been shot dead on my doorstep when I returned home.

Just saying....

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On 10/26/2019 at 3:15 PM, BucketofBolts said:

Look up MECUM's Chicago auction for Friday October 25th. The Ford Model T's and As were selling for ridiculous cheap prices. 

 

I was at the Mecum Chicago auction this weekend. While the Model Ts and Model As that sold there were reasonably priced and provided people with an affordable entry into one of these cars, almost all of them were ROUGH, NOT RUNNING and, in reality, needed TOTAL RESTORATIONS. They really sold for all they were worth. They were not even close to being in the same league as Eric's car and would cost twice the asking price of Eric's car if they were to be restored by the owner-not a restoration shop.

 

Even though the photos and selling prices made these cars look cheap, there were no bargains there this weekend. The best one of the group was a very, very amateur restoration of a 1926 Model T Touring car. This car was NOT running, the incorrect and un-attractive bright green body paint was so rough you could have grated cheese on the doors, the cheap top kit barely fit the bows, the cheap interior kit barely fit the seats and the engine bay and chassis were painted with a broom. It brought about 14,000.00 with the buyers premium. Certainly not cheap let alone comparable to Eric's car.

 

https://www.mecum.com/lots/CH1019-389287/1926-ford-model-t-touring/

 

Quality cars still bring quality prices. An example from Mecum's Auction was the absolutely gorgeous 1926 Atterbury Truck. This truck was an AACA Senior from the 1980s but would still win the award today. It was rare, early, properly restored and superbly presented. The result was a strong selling price of 77,000.00.

 

https://www.mecum.com/lots/CH1019-389309/1926-atterbury-5-ton-dually-pickup/

 

It doesn't matter if it is prewar or postwar, junk cars bring junk selling prices, fair quality cars sell for fair prices, good cars bring good  prices and great cars bring great  prices. The problem with today's market is that many owners do not know which category a particular car honestly fits into.

Edited by motoringicons (see edit history)
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On ‎10‎/‎25‎/‎2019 at 5:59 PM, ericmac said:

A Model T, like any car, has to be restored because of the love of the car and not for a financial benefit.  The numbers just don't work otherwise. 

So true! I'm doing it for my old girl... she deserves an owner that treats her right for a change. It will never reach the awesome level of your car but it will be a far cry from care under its previous owners.

 

 

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I really appreciate all of the kind comments about my car, especially from people like Guy and Ben. who have seen the car in person. I remain confident that someone will look at the car and appreciate what they see. This really is more to me than "just a car" so I want it to go to the right home where it will be treasured as much as I have. Thanks all for looking.

Eric 

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  • 4 weeks later...
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  • 4 weeks later...

Winter special pricing is available for this. I would sell at a price that likely would make it the cheapest Grand National winner out there. 

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On 8/10/2019 at 10:55 PM, Matt Harwood said:

Being able to buy the best of its kind for under $20,000 seems like a no-brainer if you want a Model T. Unfortunately, so many people are only focused on the price and whether it matches the "price guides." Nobody understands quality until they're stranded by the side of the road in their bargain. 

 

As the old saying goes, "The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price has faded."


I too agree, I’ve been with the same GM Dealership for 20 years and while I have only recently, a year and half ago, gotten into this crazy yet fun hobby I have however been into motorcycles my entire life!

 

Ive had more motorcycles than most people can count however, the old verbiage is true “Something is worth what another is willing to pay”!  I, by some’s standards, “overpaid” for one of my beloved bikes!  I myself do not think I overpaid as honestly I would have actually paid double to get THIS bike!  THIS bike I could not afford when they actually made them (1998-2003) so when I had the opportunity to purchase this motorcycle I jumped at the chance.  Well I couldn’t actually jump as I was searching the internet while I was actually at my Wife’s Grandmother’s funeral services when I found it! 😳

 

But I wanted this bike, I wanted when I couldn’t afford it, so when I found it and could I jumped at the chance and I will NEVER part with it!  Someone couldn’t give me $1M for it to be honest w you.  THIS BIKE means something to me and to me and only me it signifies “success”.

 

Id buy this “T” in a minute if I had more room (common issue w gear heads) and wasn’t already on the hunt for something at the moment.  
 

it honestly befudddles me that our cars don’t bring more than they do, relics like our classic cars are so much more significant than a 70 Chevelle ,  Duece, Challenger, Cuda, should I keep going?  As nice as they are they “to me” just aren’t as significant as classic cars.  Shit, those models had 70-80 years to get where they were...... and they didn’t survive the challenges of the dust bowl, the Depression, Black Friday, Capone, Dillinger, Segal, and Baby Face Nelson....ok throw Pop Corn Sutton in there too 😂😂😂

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7 hours ago, Crazyfamily said:


I too agree, I’ve been with the same GM Dealership for 20 years and while I have only recently, a year and half ago, gotten into this crazy yet fun hobby I have however been into motorcycles my entire life!

 

Ive had more motorcycles than most people can count however, the old verbiage is true “Something is worth what another is willing to pay”!  I, by some’s standards, “overpaid” for one of my beloved bikes!  I myself do not think I overpaid as honestly I would have actually paid double to get THIS bike!  THIS bike I could not afford when they actually made them (1998-2003) so when I had the opportunity to purchase this motorcycle I jumped at the chance.  Well I couldn’t actually jump as I was searching the internet while I was actually at my Wife’s Grandmother’s funeral services when I found it! 😳

 

But I wanted this bike, I wanted when I couldn’t afford it, so when I found it and could I jumped at the chance and I will NEVER part with it!  Someone couldn’t give me $1M for it to be honest w you.  THIS BIKE means something to me and to me and only me it signifies “success”.

 

Id buy this “T” in a minute if I had more room (common issue w gear heads) and wasn’t already on the hunt for something at the moment.  
 

it honestly befudddles me that our cars don’t bring more than they do, relics like our classic cars are so much more significant than a 70 Chevelle ,  Duece, Challenger, Cuda, should I keep going?  As nice as they are they “to me” just aren’t as significant as classic cars.  Shit, those models had 70-80 years to get where they were...... and they didn’t survive the challenges of the dust bowl, the Depression, Black Friday, Capone, Dillinger, Segal, and Baby Face Nelson....ok throw Pop Corn Sutton in there too 😂😂😂

Things are indeed strange in the world of car sales. My daily driver was on its last legs so we bought a replacement for it. I placed the car for sale in a couple places, cheap. The phone almost immediately started ringing.  "I'm calling about the car for sale." So, i started telling them about the Yukon  only to have one person say, sorry,  wrong number,  I'm calling about a Ford Model T. I kept him on the phone but while describing the car to him, a second person called, leaving a message  also about the Model T.  While calling him back I got yet another call about the Lincoln I'd advertised here 6 months ago.  In the meantime I got 2 messages about the Yukon.  Nothing is done yet but it was a strange couple hours and could result in the sale of all three cars. One never knows.

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Had very light activity on a T project I had in 2018 over a couple mos.  I lost motivation but relisted on Good Friday last Spring, it was picked up within 24 hours with 2 other real leads in reserve, all calling within 2 hours time from one fb market post.  so yes sometimes its interesting...

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • ericmac changed the title to 1926 Ford Model T Touring updated price

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