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1926 Ford Model T Touring updated price


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Without a doubt, this is one of the very best restored Improved Ford Tourings anywhere in the world. A comprehensive and exhaustive, no expense spared, frame-up restoration from a rust free, Virginia car was completed over the course of five years. The effort resulted in an AACA Senior Grand National award, with multiple repeat-preservation awards, most recently at the Auburn AACA Grand National, June 2019. The car was the winner of the MTFCI 2006 Stynowski award for most meritorious restoration of the year, multiple Concours class awards including Meadowbrook Concours, Willistead Concours, Greenfield Village Old Car Festival (first place 3 years in a row) and Best of Show at the Hoosier Auto Show. This car appeared on the cover of the Model T Times and Antique Automobile with accompanying feature articles. Nothing but the best work was done as evidenced by a Sandy McTavish engine rebuild, Coil Doctor coils, Mark Eyre paintwork, Gord Koll woodwork, Mark Larder upholstery, nickel by QualKrom and much more. This is a car that runs and drives even better than it looks. It has always been fastidiously maintained so it needs absolutely nothing cosmetically or mechanically. You can drive and/or show it anywhere with pride. No disappointments. I am reluctantly offering the car for sale only because another project is calling my name. Loudly. I am now asking one third of my investment. The new price of $16,500 is a deal. Trust me, this is probably the cheapest ticket to a place on an AACA Grand National show field for a four wheeled vehicle available today.  I have many more photos available that I can e-mail upon request. The car is located about 10 miles off highway I-94 so seeing the car is easy on, easy off. I am glad to answer any questions. Eric Macleod 269-420-3852. ewmacleod@hotmail.com

Front Touring.jpg

back touring.jpg

26 side curtain.jpg

26 Interior.jpg

Edited by ericmac
Lower price again (see edit history)
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Ben,

Thanks for the kind words. I tried very hard to make this car as good as it possibly could be.  It will be a very hard day when it leaves my posession but the new owner will have a real gem. One thing I forgot to say in my original ad was there was a time when my daily driver was out of commission.  Not having another car available at the time, I commuted 60 miles a day in this T...for three weeks. I'd say that's a pretty good test of its durability. And I received my AGNS award, after I did all that driving!

Thanks again. 

Eric

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I doubt those bumpers on the Buick are factory originals.  There's your 10" and change. 

There is a car out there where I failed when it was time to pull the trigger.  You'll never regret buying the right car when it comes along.

Thanks for the kind words Ben. Folks, Ben was a reminder that we have some really great people in this hobby.

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While there are a lot of Model Ts for sale, great examples like this car, are few and far between.

I have seen this car in person multiple times since the restoration was completed. It is extraordinary in every way.

This car is worth every penny of the asking price. There is not another one like it.

Edited by motoringicons (see edit history)
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Hello Guy, 

Thanks for your kind words. I am very much humbled by the high praise.  

Speaking to anyone reading this, if you want to see the car I am delighted to show it and go for a drive. You won't be disappointed. 

Eric 

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Why this didn't sell within hours of coming up for sale is beyond me.

 

A truly AMAZING car!

 

Didn't he say he drove it 30 miles each way to work several weeks while his regular driver was in the shop?

 

Enough said!

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I continue to be very humbled by the kind words here. I really have loved this car for the 20 years I have owned snd maintained it. If i  had not heard another r car calling my name you would never see this car for sale. As the original ad stated, i am willing to listen to reasonable offers. Thanks again everyone. 

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Has the Model T world gone nuts?

I know they are a squeaky bunch but a Stynowski award winning car isn't selling at the price in the first post?

One couldn't take an unmolested original GOOD car and MAKE it a Stynowski winner for that kind of money.

 

 

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On 8/3/2019 at 2:25 AM, cahartley said:

Has the Model T world gone nuts?

I know they are a squeaky bunch but a Stynowski award winning car isn't selling at the price in the first post?

One couldn't take an unmolested original GOOD car and MAKE it a Stynowski winner for that kind of money.

 

 

No...it takes about triple that amount. I know from first hand experience!

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Interest is easy to come by! Money not so much. After nearly thirty years of the most corrupt government since the fall of the Roman Empire, the lower end hobbyists have been hit really hard with under-employment and outsourcing.  What we have today was totally predictable. I know Eric through a model T forum. Although I have never met him in person or seen the car myself, I know him to be an excellent caretaker of our wonderful model Ts and know that if I could afford such a car, he would be a person I would seriously consider buying from. Without a solid base of passionate hobbyists with a couple hundred dollars to spend every month, the only part of our hobby that might survive is the upper echelon collecting million dollar cars. 

Without that lower base of hobbyists, the lower end cars in the hobby may yet find themselves relegated again to the back forty, or sent as recycling to Korea once China has its belly full.

Sorry for the rant, and the drift. But you asked. It isn't the lack of interest. It is the near total lack of discretionary income for the majority of the nation.

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10 hours ago, wayne sheldon said:

Interest is easy to come by! Money not so much. After nearly thirty years of the most corrupt government since the fall of the Roman Empire, the lower end hobbyists have been hit really hard with under-employment and outsourcing.  What we have today was totally predictable. I know Eric through a model T forum. Although I have never met him in person or seen the car myself, I know him to be an excellent caretaker of our wonderful model Ts and know that if I could afford such a car, he would be a person I would seriously consider buying from. Without a solid base of passionate hobbyists with a couple hundred dollars to spend every month, the only part of our hobby that might survive is the upper echelon collecting million dollar cars. 

Without that lower base of hobbyists, the lower end cars in the hobby may yet find themselves relegated again to the back forty, or sent as recycling to Korea once China has its belly full.

Sorry for the rant, and the drift. But you asked. It isn't the lack of interest. It is the near total lack of discretionary income for the majority of the nation.

Wayne, no need to apologize for the rant. You are echoing a point I have made to other hobbyists for many years. I believe you are right about the change in economic fortunes,  especially when considering those of more modest means. Like many on this forum I find myself having to make some choices in order to 1. Get a car I want and 2. Maintain what I already have and 3. Face a point in life where I either need to act on a dream or let it go.

That last point has left me with the realization that the time to act is now, so that's what I am doing. 

Sorry for MY rant!

All the best to everyone here.

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On 08/05/2019 at 3:29 AM, wayne sheldon said:

Interest is easy to come by! Money not so much. After nearly thirty years of the most corrupt government since the fall of the Roman Empire, the lower end hobbyists have been hit really hard with under-employment and outsourcing.  What we have today was totally predictable. I know Eric through a model T forum. Although I have never met him in person or seen the car myself, I know him to be an excellent caretaker of our wonderful model Ts and know that if I could afford such a car, he would be a person I would seriously consider buying from. Without a solid base of passionate hobbyists with a couple hundred dollars to spend every month, the only part of our hobby that might survive is the upper echelon collecting million dollar cars. 

Without that lower base of hobbyists, the lower end cars in the hobby may yet find themselves relegated again to the back forty, or sent as recycling to Korea once China has its belly full.

Sorry for the rant, and the drift. But you asked. It isn't the lack of interest. It is the near total lack of discretionary income for the majority of the nation.

Without a doubt you are correct.  I have an advanced technical degree, but my wages don't reflect that.  My wages have been little more than flat over the last 25 years.  The entry level position pays 5k more than when I started in it, less than a 20% increase over a quarter century.  Conversely, old timers I worked with when I started experienced a tenfold increase in wages over 30 years.

 

Real estate has gone nowhere.  I still live in an entry level house as there has been no real estate appreciation for years.  Anything with lots of land requires you pay more than a developer.  So, I can only afford lower end vehicles and storage is a MAJOR issue.

 

It could be far worse, however.  At least my college loan debt was reasonable.  Young kids today will experience wages that don't even keep up with inflation but yet have massive student loan payments.

 

I would have bought this car long ago if I experienced substantial wage increases and real estate appreciation, allowing me the money to better pursue this hobby and afford a trophy property to properly store my unique finds.

 

For these very reasons, I'm finding it difficult to sell my Model A Ford.

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I also should mention my lack of disposable income is also due to my need, as well as others now, to save for our retirement.  In the past, this was not the case.  You could even be irresponsible, and as long as you showed up for work and were conscientious about it, your retirement was provided for you once you made it to retirement age.

 

I do save the maximum I can for retirement, because I want out of the rat race at an early age.  Leaves me without the fun money I would like.  Most in this country now lack any discretionary income plus have no retirement savings.

 

Welcome to a third world country.

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Being able to buy the best of its kind for under $20,000 seems like a no-brainer if you want a Model T. Unfortunately, so many people are only focused on the price and whether it matches the "price guides." Nobody understands quality until they're stranded by the side of the road in their bargain. 

 

As the old saying goes, "The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price has faded."

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1 hour ago, Matt Harwood said:

Being able to buy the best of its kind for under $20,000 seems like a no-brainer if you want a Model T. Unfortunately, so many people are only focused on the price and whether it matches the "price guides." Nobody understands quality until they're stranded by the side of the road in their bargain. 

 

As the old saying goes, "The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price has faded."

You are so right. 

 

While I wish I could say this car has never stranded me, that wouldn't be true. On at least three occasions I ran out of gas (duh!), once I caught a nail in a tire and once I had a catastrophic problem with the transmission due to a low quality reproduction part. The new owner has a new transmission drum, clutch,  bands, etc...in there as a result of that. Not bad in 15 years of use.

 

I have had significant interest in the car this week so hopefully the stars will line up. Thanks for the kind words Matt.

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Guys (and gals),

We all know.........

Some cars sell fast, some take a long time to find a new home.

For sellers, they usually bring "less than they're worth" but they're never worth more than a buyer will spend.

This looks like it's probably the best late Model T out there and represents a great value but it's priced in the brass T range so it may take some time for Mr. or Ms. Right to come along.

Just my two cents.

Henry F.

 

 

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18 minutes ago, Ben Perfitt said:

Did I just say I wasn’t looking at this thread again...?

Ooof, and of course Henry, you are right.

 

For decades I’ve seen cars of this level come up and in my mind I could just never justify the price. It never seemed practical to buy a ‘show car’ when an impeccably kept ‘older restoration’ could be had for 1/2 the price. All I really wanted was just a nice little touring.

THEN I got that little touring, and I think you know how that went — 10K here, 10K there. Now its top is a little tattered....

That is how I learned the value of a car like the one being offered here. I’d say I wish someone had been generous enough to explain that value to me - but I’d be lying. Many people did. I just didn’t listen.

I’m done 🙂

 

You certainly aren't alone, Ben. Almost every one of us who plays with old cars has been fooled by the "buy a cheaper car and add value with a little elbow grease" myth. Cheaper cars are always more expensive in the long run than expensive cars and buying someone else's expensive car for $0.40 on the dollar is the most logical way to do an illogical thing like buying an old car. But for most, it's a difficult lesson to learn unless your own wallet does the bleeding and even then some never learn. I can't fathom anyone putting on the brakes for a sub-$20,000 car, regardless of what it is. There are four-year-old Hyundais that cost more than the best 1926 Ford Model T in the world. How is anyone balking at that, price guides be damned?!?


If you want to have a nice car, buy a nice car. But if you want to have less money, buy a lesser car.

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42 minutes ago, Ben Perfitt said:

Did I just say I wasn’t looking at this thread again...?

Ooof, and of course Henry, you are right.

 

For decades I’ve seen cars of this level come up and in my mind I could just never justify the price. It never seemed practical to buy a ‘show car’ when an impeccably kept ‘older restoration’ could be had for 1/2 the price. All I really wanted was just a nice little touring.

THEN I got that little touring, and I think you know how that went — 10K here, 10K there. Now its top is a little tattered....

That is how I learned the value of a car like the one being offered here. I’d say I wish someone had been generous enough to explain that value to me - but I’d be lying. Many people did. I just didn’t listen.

I’m done 🙂

Wasn't there a guy on this thread who said "just buy the car?" 

In truth, I actually have had several people who have expressed interest in the car so far, all of them stating "I'm going to regret not buying this car." Don't let that person be you. You'll never regret paying a little too much for the right car.

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...
On 8/11/2019 at 4:14 AM, mrcvs said:

I also should mention my lack of disposable income is also due to my need, as well as others now, to save for our retirement.  In the past, this was not the case.  You could even be irresponsible, and as long as you showed up for work and were conscientious about it, your retirement was provided for you once you made it to retirement age.

 

I do save the maximum I can for retirement, because I want out of the rat race at an early age.  Leaves me without the fun money I would like.  Most in this country now lack any discretionary income plus have no retirement savings.

 

Welcome to a third world country.

Third world country ? 

When you look at the almost daily shootings and the number of people begging for food and  money  in the streets you would think so.

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40 minutes ago, Matt Harwood said:

NOBODY regrets paying too much for a good car.

 

There are a great many people who regret buying a bad car because it was a bargain.

 

Buying old cars is like buying oats. If you want good clean fresh oats you have to pay a fair price. If you can settle for oats that have already been through the horse that comes cheaper...

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On ‎8‎/‎12‎/‎2019 at 8:32 PM, Car-Nicopia said:

I’m curious about the color of the wheels. Was it common for them to be so vibrant on a Model T?

 

Many of these cars were not so vibrant, including my own when it was first restored. I wanted a bit more flash, if it could be done in an authentic fashion.

To my great fortune,  on October 25, 1925 Ford issed a memo explaining the use of wire wheels for the Improved Fords. The wheels were a $25 upcharge. At the request of the customer for an additional $5 the dealer could offer the wheels painted one of four colors,  which were to be applied with a brush over the black painted wheels. These colors were Casino Red (orange), Vermilion (red), Straw (cream) or Emerald Green (apple green), typically with stripes to match. 

At $30 the wire wheels were not an inexpensive improvement on a $290 (or $330, assuming one already ponied up the money for the self-starter equipped) car.

Great question!

Edited by ericmac
typos and clarification (see edit history)
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22 hours ago, ericmac said:

Many of these cars were not so vibrant, including my own when it was first restored. I wanted a bit more flash, if it could be done in an authentic fashion.

To my great fortune,  on October 25, 1925 Ford issed a memo explaining the use of wire wheels for the Improved Fords. The wheels were a $25 upcharge. At the request of the customer for an additional $5 the dealer could offer the wheels painted one of four colors,  which were to be applied with a brush over the black painted wheels. These colors were Casino Red (orange), Vermilion (red), Straw (cream) or Emerald Green (apple green), typically with stripes to match. 

At $30 the wire wheels were not an inexpensive improvement on a $290 (or $330, assuming one already ponied up the money for the self-starter equipped) car.

Great question!

 

Thanks for the info. At some point, I hope to own a Model T. Because of the length of time it was in production run, the huge volume and the variety of offerings, there seems to be an endless number of facets to these gems. 

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Car-Nicopia,

Just a quick comment from me. Being a long-time early car hobbyist, leaning toward the brass era, but with interests well through the "nickel age" '20s, and some interest in newer collector cars, also passionate about history in general. I have had numerous model Ts, several speedsters (a whole world unto themselves!), a TT truck, a coupe,  a center-door sedan, now restoring a '15 runabout. I study era photos in minute detail. Immerse myself in the minutia of the changes made by Ford, the why, the when. 

The model T Ford is the ultimate icon of mass production, fifteen million made all alike! No two exactly alike.

Yeah, model T Fords are just about the most enjoyment one can get for their dollars.

 

Eric's touring car is one of the finest quality restorations available on the market today. I have not seen it myself, but I know a few people that have.

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12 hours ago, wayne sheldon said:

Car-Nicopia,

Just a quick comment from me. Being a long-time early car hobbyist, leaning toward the brass era, but with interests well through the "nickel age" '20s, and some interest in newer collector cars, also passionate about history in general. I have had numerous model Ts, several speedsters (a whole world unto themselves!), a TT truck, a coupe,  a center-door sedan, now restoring a '15 runabout. I study era photos in minute detail. Immerse myself in the minutia of the changes made by Ford, the why, the when. 

The model T Ford is the ultimate icon of mass production, fifteen million made all alike! No two exactly alike.

Yeah, model T Fords are just about the most enjoyment one can get for their dollars.

 

Eric's touring car is one of the finest quality restorations available on the market today. I have not seen it myself, but I know a few people that have.

Wayne,  I really appreciate the comment.  I don't think anyone will be disappointed with the car. Thanks again.

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  • 2 weeks later...

This one is still looking for a good place to live. I have to give a shout out to Matt Harwood who probably could have made some money on this one but instead gave me 30 minutes of his time offering me free advice.  Melanie answered the phone and was a delight as well. Good people there.

Still available is the best open Improved Ford on the market todat. Give me a call and let's go for a drive!

269-four two zero-3852.

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One of the nicest tops I've seen on a T, and I know what it takes to make a nice top.  Can't do it with a kit, needs to be custom fit, 60 to 70 hours work minimum. So, the top on this car represents 25-30% of asking price, minimum.

 

I've drive a great Model T.  The difference between the average T and a great one is HUGE.  

 

This car should sell easily, except to those who use price guides and offer 7K, thinking they're so smart to use the guide, and missing the point completely....

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2 hours ago, trimacar said:

One of the nicest tops I've seen on a T, and I know what it takes to make a nice top.  Can't do it with a kit, needs to be custom fit, 60 to 70 hours work minimum. So, the top on this car represents 25-30% of asking price, minimum.

 

I've drive a great Model T.  The difference between the average T and a great one is HUGE.  

 

This car should sell easily, except to those who use price guides and offer 7K, thinking they're so smart to use the guide, and missing the point completely....

To answer the question with 100% honesty I really don't remember the price of the top and interior work, but keep in mind it was done in about 2004 and maintained ever since . The lowball offer of 7K you reference might have covered the cost of the upholstery, but would  only have barely covered it. Then you throw in tires with correct metal stem tubes, engine rebuild, transmission and hogshead machine work and bearings, wiring, steering gear, front and rear axle rebuilds, fresh starter and generator, nickel plating, new glass and...oh, yeah, we still have to put 9 gallons of DuPont Centari on the whole thing at $200 per gallon. Shoot, there was probably $2000 spent in correct nuts, bolts and cotter pins. Thank god I was able to assemble it myself!

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4 hours ago, Ben Perfitt said:

Eric,

Would you mind telling us what percentage the Mark Larder upholstery and top represent of the $18,500 that you are now asking for this still flawless Stynowski winning car?

 

Thanks,

Ben P.

 

forum thread on Mark Larder Auto Upholstery here ⬇️

 

A LOT! See my reply to Trim A Car.

Ben, I still think you need to own this one.

Thanks for the question. 

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  • ericmac changed the title to 1926 Ford Model T Touring updated price

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