Summershandy

6 volt generator charging system in question

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On my Pontiac, yes. On Summershandy's I see the negative cable goes straight to the block rather than the frame. That lessens the importance of the third cable somewhat (but it does still need to be good).

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This is great news! You should celebrate this moment; it doesn't always work out this way with old cars. Rarely are things as they seem, even given obvious circumstances. I can't tell you how many times I've had a problem, found an obvious cause for said problem, fixed it, and had the problem persist anyway. Maddening.

 

All the upgrades you've done there should last a long, long time and build confidence in the car. It's a wonderful feeling to be able to get in and know that it will do what you expect it to do, regardless of the weather. Little things really do make a difference!

 

Happy motoring!

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Grounding to the block to the battery doesn't always translate to a chassis ground.

I had a customer once that was getting sparks at his throttle foot feed when his headlights were on,  Might have had them with lights off as well but never noticed.

Engines and trannys are all mounted on rubber.

Most electrical problems are 'groundless'.

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16 minutes ago, Matt Harwood said:

This is great news! You should celebrate this moment; it doesn't always work out this way with old cars.

 

Tell me about it brother! I still have little wrinkles I keep trying to iron out even though I go through the steps in repairs and fixes. Still, I read a lot that if this isn't your thing then maybe one of these cars aren't for you! Always something around the corner I say. 

 

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18 hours ago, JACK M said:

That cable from the frame to block (starter) may be the most important cable in the car.

 

 What Jack said!  One can never have TOO much ground. Perhaps more than need, but never too much. 

 

 Example.  I owned several Semi Tractors [ trucks ] in my driving career. One , back in  the early 90s was an Autocar. I was replacing lighting circuit toggle switches every month or so. They would just fail. One day, while messing with the electrics, i grabbed onto a ground from the cab [ body ] to the starter mounting bolt. Almost blistered my fingers, it was so hot. I had an 00 ground cable made and installed .  Never replaced another toggle switch in 12 years.    Can not have too much ground.

 

  Ben

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As far as the multi meter dropping to 0 and then to 3 and 4,   are you using a digital meter?    The digital meters  often do funky things as the  voltage changes.  A good old meter with a needle is best.

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14 minutes ago, Pete O said:

are you using a digital meter? 

 

Ya my first meter that's digital....and probably a cheap one at that!  No one ever learned me how to use one. I wing it from YouTube! I did find a bad spark plug once on an old motorcycle though. That was helpful. Was also using it to check the car battery. Luckily, I haven't had any real electrical issues. 

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I know i'm a little late to this party, internet issues. You have to be careful when using digital meters on vehicles with mechanical points. Such as ignition, voltage regulator and relays. Digital meters can be very sensitive and overreact to the opening and closing of the points. Making you think you have a severe voltage fluctuation. Whenever I am setting a mechanical regulator on my bench I use an analog meter. Cost does not matter I have seen Fluke brand meters with this issue. Put your meter on your daily driver fluctuation most likely will not be seen. 

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3 hours ago, certjeff1 said:

I know i'm a little late to this party, internet issues

But better late than never I always say! Especially if there's knowledge to be shared. 

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3 hours ago, certjeff1 said:

I know i'm a little late to this party, internet issues. You have to be careful when using digital meters on vehicles with mechanical points. Such as ignition, voltage regulator and relays. Digital meters can be very sensitive and overreact to the opening and closing of the points. Making you think you have a severe voltage fluctuation. Whenever I am setting a mechanical regulator on my bench I use an analog meter. Cost does not matter I have seen Fluke brand meters with this issue. Put your meter on your daily driver fluctuation most likely will not be seen. 

 

It either works or it doesn't! As you mentioned it often doesn't, thats why I asked the question. Digital meters don't work at all on my 36 Pontiac. The good ones (Fluke, Tektronix) just lock up. Analog VOMs work fine, but generally don't have the resolution you need to set up a voltage regulator. Not everyone has an Allen or Sun generator test set laying around..... I am currently building an analog meter just for this purpose.

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