nzcarnerd

American 'light car' circa 1912?

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A photo taken in Christchurch, New Zealand, at a date unknown. Although the library notes it as 'circa 1910' I think it might be a few years later.

 

I can see no sign of rear springs so I assume it either has quarter elliptics or maybe even a transverse rear spring.

 

Chch c 1910 Adam Henry Pearson photo A T Lib.jpg

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Nice pic!

 

The unusual shape of those hubcaps ought to be a decent clue.  

 

I have no idea what it is.

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Thanks. I don't know how many of the early Paige cars were sold in NZ but in the 1920s the Jewetts and later Graham-Paiges were very popular and there are several survivors.

 

There is a very nice 1922 Paige which has been with the same owner for many years. It has the front wheel brake setup from a circa 1924 car - and a modern five-speed light truck gearbox to enable it to cruise at open road speeds.

 

 

30874347926_1ce2424ccb_b.jpg

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Layden is correct (as usual). It's a 1912 Paige-Detroit. Here's our 1911. Very similar chassis, very different body. 

 

IMG_4678.JPG

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That radiator emblem on the car in question is not a diamond shape.

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The diamond shaped emblem on our car was added by the dealer in 1928 when it was traded in on a new Paige. It should be round, and you can see the mark where it used to be.

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Tough crowd here, Chris... LOL!

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5 hours ago, keiser31 said:

That radiator emblem on the car in question is not a diamond shape.

 

Maybe the diamond shape came when the cars went from being Paige-Detroit to just Paige?

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6 hours ago, Chris Paulsen said:

Layden is correct (as usual). It's a 1912 Paige-Detroit. Here's our 1911. Very similar chassis, very different body. 

 

IMG_4678.JPG

 

Perhaps you could post a rear view photo to illustrate the unusual rear spring arrangement.

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Here it is. The top of the spring assembly mounts on the frame. The bottom of the spring assembly mounts on a bracket cast right into the rear axle housing.

 

Sorry, these are the best photos I have right now.

 

IMG_4691.JPG

 

IMG_4692.JPG

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But a transverse full elliptic rear spring isn't very common in my experience.

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Yes, I don't know of another one, but I guess there are a few.

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Didn't some late '20s Cadillacs have a transverse rear spring?

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No, last one was 1914... just before they went to the V8.

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I don't know just when Cadillac did away with the extra rear spring.

 

This photo turned up on a Facebook page a couple of days ago. The hubcaps say it is a Cadillac - I think. The windshield says to me it is some sort of  Fleetwood Custom body (maybe??)

 

00 to 30 0907 maybe Cadillac.jpg

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This 1918 car certainly has a transverse spring.

 

 

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7 hours ago, edinmass said:

No, last one was 1914... just before they went to the V8.

 

From a quick internet search it would appear that Cadillac retained the extra transverse rear spring until 1925.

 

 

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I have a vague memory of a story told by a Cadillac driver on our 1996 International Rally. We drove beside the Tekapo Canal for a while. The Cadillac driver said he was just driving along enjoying the scenery and the back pulled out to pass him. The car just spun. He had no idea what caused it, but there were mumblings that the rear spring arrangement was believed or known to cause some instability. My further vague memory is that it had the transverse spring mounted on the ends of quarter elliptic cantilever springs. Am I going potty or is this possible?

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2 hours ago, Tinindian said:

But it is a semi-elliptic spring, not a full elliptic.

 

I responded to Spinneyhill's question about 1920s Cadillacs having transverse springs. Yes they are a semi elliptic spring - and not a full elliptic - as an addition to the regular fore and aft springs. Called 'platform' springing - I think.  Several heavier cars used it but it would seem that Cadillac was the most prolific user of the idea.

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53 minutes ago, Spinneyhill said:

I have a vague memory of a story told by a Cadillac driver on our 1996 International Rally. We drove beside the Tekapo Canal for a while. The Cadillac driver said he was just driving along enjoying the scenery and the back pulled out to pass him. The car just spun. He had no idea what caused it, but there were mumblings that the rear spring arrangement was believed or known to cause some instability. My further vague memory is that it had the transverse spring mounted on the ends of quarter elliptic cantilever springs. Am I going potty or is this possible?

 

As I noted in my last post the Cadillacs with 'platform' suspension have conventional semi elliptics with the transverse semi elliptic spring.  It was Buick that used a cantilever rear springs - and they were semi and not quarter elliptic. Rolls-Royce used the same idea. I have an idea some Rolls-Royces may have had platform rear springs.

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The Rolls-Royce 40/50 of 1907 had platform rear suspension; from 1908 it was equipped with three quarterback elliptic rear springs witch were superseeded in 1912 with cantilevers.

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