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B Jake Moran

1950 Dodge Wayfarer Convertible Project - Auction

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https://vanderbrinkauction.proxibid.com/Collector-Cars/Project-Barn-Cars/1950-Dodge-Wayfarer-Convertible/lotInformation/48497404

 

An interesting car, truly rarely seen and 101% of the readers will consider this a parts car.

 

But eh, maybe?   Last time I was active into Mopars, which has been awhile, these cars were well supported by vendors parts wise - for mechanicals.  Unlike some of the 8 cylinder New Yorkers.  No bids yet, most of your money would be in transport.  I see a straight car, with usual floor rust on largely flat areas. 

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

Does it have roll up windows? It might be the "roadster", and if so, it's pretty rare. It has something like a window on the passenger side, but I don't see a slot in the top of the door, nor any window cranks.

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They touted it as a "Roadster" so it may not have roll up windows, but that seems hard to believe for 1949 America, unless you are a Crosley.

 

1949-1952 Dodge Wayfarer Prices and Production:

1949 Wayfarer (wb 115) Weight Price Production
coupe, 3P 3,065 $1,611 9,342
2d sedan 3,180 1,738 49,054
roadster/convertible 3,145 1,727 5,420
Total 1949 Wayfarer     63,816
1950 Wayfarer (wb 115) Weight Price Production
coupe, 3P 3,095 1,611 7,500
2d sedan 3,200 1,738 65,000
Sportabout convertible 3,155 1,727 2,903
Total 1950 Wayfarer     75,403
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1 hour ago, B Jake Moran said:

But eh, maybe? 

 

If I bought that and gave it to you,  I would spend the rest of my life looking over my shoulder.

 

25-30k will buy the nicest one in the world.   10-15k will get you one that has a frame under it.

 

For me,  I would want an early 49 with the side curtains,  or a 51 with the updated nose.

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1 hour ago, Bloo said:

Does it have roll up windows? It might be the "roadster", and if so, it's pretty rare. It has something like a window on the passenger side, but I don't see a slot in the top of the door, nor any window cranks.

It is the roadster with side curtains and not roll up windows. You can see the holes for the mounting pins if you look closely at the driver's door.

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)

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27 minutes ago, alsancle said:

 

If I bought that and gave it to you,  I would spend the rest of my life looking over my shoulder.

 

25-30k will buy the nicest one in the world.   10-15k will get you one that has a frame under it.

 

For me,  I would want an early 49 with the side curtains,  or a 51 with the updated nose.

I don't want to spend $25,000 on the best one, I want to enjoy restoration as a hobby. 


49, 50, 51, does not matter.  I suppose it does if a person is a particular fan of a certain car.  I know Mopars got better looking the further one got away from the 49 restyle.  (* I owned a 1949 New Yorker Club Coupe)   I should have expected a "you can get one for $25,000 and not waste your time restoring it" comment. 

 

There is no question, as you state, the restoration hobby is dead, dead, dead.  NOBODY at all is restoring anything. 

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1 hour ago, B Jake Moran said:

They touted it as a "Roadster" so it may not have roll up windows, but that seems hard to believe for 1949 America, unless you are a Crosley.

 

It was the last one!, at least in full size American cars. Mechanix Illustrated ran an article when it was new.

Edited by Bloo (see edit history)

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10 minutes ago, Bloo said:

 

It was the last one!, at least in full size American cars. Mechanix Illustrated ran an article when it was new.

Until the Viper....it is full size, but only room for two.

VIPER.jpg

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)
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I do think the age of the restoration is over.   The basic skills necessary to do a home restoration are fading away,  and even then you need some level of professional help and parts.   Both the later are getting harder to come by.

 

But,  if you really want a Wayfarer restoration project,   find one that has a frame under it and pay a little more.    None of us have an infinite amount of time.

 

Here is the more desirable 51 for 5k or BO.   Underneath might be just as bad, I don't know.

 

https://www.hemmings.com/classifieds/cars-for-sale/dodge/wayfarer/2261853.html

 

 

image.thumb.png.c03a2479d6b0d268b413266b2c23e34b.png

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1 hour ago, keiser31 said:

That one has the roll up windows.

 

I know. I like the 51 styling.

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5 hours ago, B Jake Moran said:

They touted it as a "Roadster" so it may not have roll up windows, but that seems hard to believe for 1949 America, unless you are a Crosley.

 

1949-1952 Dodge Wayfarer Prices and Production:

1949 Wayfarer (wb 115) Weight Price Production
coupe, 3P 3,065 $1,611 9,342
2d sedan 3,180 1,738 49,054
roadster/convertible 3,145 1,727 5,420
Total 1949 Wayfarer     63,816
1950 Wayfarer (wb 115) Weight Price Production
coupe, 3P 3,095 1,611 7,500
2d sedan 3,200 1,738 65,000
Sportabout convertible 3,155 1,727 2,903
Total 1950 Wayfarer     75,403

 

I thought the roadster was a one year only deal. Could the car in the first post be a 49 instead of a 50?

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The early 49 models had side curtains.  They changed to roll up during the 49 Model year and stayed with that configuration until the end of the run.  I had one.  It ran but turned out to be a total rust bucket.  The inner rockers - the backbone of the body - were virtually rusted away, as was most of the front floor.  I found 4 NOS fenders for it and started the restoration.  Then I found the the frame - unique to the convertible - was rusted badly.  I could punch holes in the frame with the jab of a screwdriver.  To add to the problem, the Wayfarer frames are short wheelbase, hard to find.  After I added up the cost of chrome, paint, interior, top, tires, mechanical work and my labor - and found three nice ones for sale in the 20 to 25K range - I gave up and sold it, taking a $500 loss.  (I was very lucky!). And the cars for sale took a long, long time to sell.  I know one went for $16,000 and was a good solid car.  A good sheet metal man who can weld and lay a good coat of paint could have had fun with it, I guess, but it was beyond my capabilities.  In a stroke of irony, I sold that car plus my 48 Plymouth to purchase my 32 Dodge Brothers sedan - the first car I ever owned, the actual car.  I probably have more time and money in it now than I would have had if I’d continued with the Wayfarer, but I’m enjoying this ride a lot more.  Restoring  something you love that is part of your past makes it worth it - at least to me.

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You know, I was thinking of your wayfarer when I was recommending getting one with a solid frame.  I remember your pictures when you started restoring it.

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While I admire anyone interested in their own restoration work, the two thoughts (from my experience only, having completed one successful restoration, bagged a couple and gone the driver route) that come to mind are:

 

Be realistic about your own time, ability and funding.

 

Always buy the best car you can afford.  The better the start the better the end result.  Run, dont walk from any of these three issues:  rust, incomplete vehicles, field cars needing everything.

 

Its not about making money, but it should be about being able to see it through without losing your shirt, and perhaps driving your project within a decade give or take.

 

Like Alsancle, I like mopars and believe they represent a great value.  I would go prewar but wayfarers are cool also.  Happy hunting!

Edited by Steve_Mack_CT (see edit history)
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I apologize for my chest puffing comments regarding the Wayfarer convertible as a viable project.   With some reflection and Taylormade's comments, I see this is not restorable, without a new frame.    I also appreciate the photo of the 51, which I toggled back and forth with the 49 and agree that the styling improvements made for 51 make for a more attractive car.  I love extending the fender lines into the door.  Potentially, in the case of the 51 above, if that is a correct factory color, that silver-blue is a nice color for this vehicle.  

 

The point regarding the general economy of restoration of these cars remain.  While I appreciate the gee whiz of the first postwar OHV V8's and automatic transmissions of some cars, they add expense, as do expensive interiors and more chrome.    Having started and not completed a few projects, I am a big fan now of the chip away method. 

 

If you can drive a car while attacking one area of restoration a year, you can enjoy it and motivate yourself.  Often times we see CL ads where the restoration is started enthusiastically and then dies.  I have no love affair with post war Plymouths but find that coupe an interesting car.   I have bid $350 on it. I expect to be outbid, but if not I will happily go get it.  

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Do not apologize, this group will do their collective best to advise if you ask, B Jake.  Alsancle and a couple others have saved me from myself a few times, and made good suggestions in suggested leads.  Unfortunately you cannot buy 'em all.  🤔😁

 

A super sound, flat head mopar, pre or postwar is not a bad ride.  I still think about the yellow 46 - 48 ply convt Auburnseeker had on this site 2 or 3 years back.  I would have loved to grab that one, but timing was wrong.  I think he sold it low, mid teens after sorting it out.  Open, prewar styling, nice colors, nice price... 

Edited by Steve_Mack_CT (see edit history)

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That link won't work.  Unfortunately after selling that Plymouth I haven't been in the position to replace it with another running ragtop. I even mentioned to the wife the other day that it was nice to have to beat around in as it ran like a top and never failed to start as well as never ran hot.  The only trouble i had was the gas tank which I took out and fixed.  The guy that bought it (for 14,500) Actually did pull it all apart and put a nice paint job on it.  Of course then he was trying to get somewhere over 30 for it,  which was way over market as they bottom out at about 20-25. 

Maybe if i sell the 40 Ford Coupe I will be able to find something.  Might even have to take something in on trade to get it sold.  Would be nice if it was one.  I like the Wayfarer roadsters as well.  There was a nice on for sale a couple of years ago in Maryland I believe for 16,500 or something similar.  It was pretty darn nice.  The ones listed above wouldn't even make a good parts car for it,  but it didn't need anything anyways except a driver. 

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That link works.  No way you could make the one in this thread look that nice for the price even if they gave it to you. 

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Sorry about the link boys.  Anyway I bet 10, 10,500 gets that little coupe. Then,  drive the wheels off it!

 

My 41 never failed to start either.  I regularly see attractively priced mopar coupes from say 51 on back.  

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Steve,  you seem to have trouble with those links.  If you compare the links,  you are losing the last 10 characters or so when you are cutting and pasting.  Put your cursor in the browser address bar.  Ctrl-A to copy all,  Ctrl-V to paste in to the post.   You can eliminate anything extraneous after the .html as it is usually just logging how you got there.

 

That flathead six is indestructible and cheap to rebuild for sure.    My dad bought me a 49 Plymouth special deluxe with 10k original miles when I was 12 to use as HS car.   It was  a 2 door,  but I wish it was this coupe!    If it had been,  I might not have I spent the next 5 years scheming and working multiple jobs to get a GTO to replace the Plymouth.

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He’s a dealer near me.  He’ll probably hold out for the higher number based on previous discussions with him on other cars.  With any dealer, you’re paying for the car and the dealer’s overhead.  Not faulting or complaining,  as a good dealer will back his cars and give the buyer a bit of security you might not get from a private purchase.  Note I said good dealers.  I’m not real comfortable with the lower section of this car.  The reflections off the fender do not match with those of the door.  Seems a bit wavy, but maybe it’s just me.

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