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You got what you paid for - a 1928 short chassis Stutz.

There is a turbocharged 1928 4 seater boattail out there. It has chassis number 88233, which is not too far from yours. Needless to say, the turbocharger is a recent addition.

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Well, at least it is no longer a farm trailer. Makes me wonder about the history of this car. How did it go from luxury car to farm trailer? Oh well, what do you think? Should I start looking for parts to build a special of some kind? Or just offer up my parts for sale. Some of those specials look real cool. Right now I'm just enjoying telling people "I own a Stutz!"

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You have a long long road to anything buildable.   The wheels (hubs, snap rings and rims) may have some value if they are not too far gone.   The rear end could have a little value if it is high speed,  otherwise it is scrap.

 

Those Stutz wheel emblems would be worth more than the whole thing if they were usable or restorable. 

 

 

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Alsancle, you are correct. Building something with this as a starting point would be a long road. Maybe impossible! But I'm allowing my youth to ignore that wisdom for now, LOL! How can I determine if the rear end is high speed? Kmstrade, I wish I had that engine! 

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Stutz parts are all over the map on pricing.. thus some hope...i feel there are more 28 to 31 parts out there than earlier years on stutzs.  i will keep an eye out and we can stay in touch . i may have extra stuff myself but no extra cowl etc.  i am on facebook  keith sparks         

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3 hours ago, alsancle said:

You have a long long road to anything buildable.   The wheels (hubs, snap rings and rims) may have some value if they are not too far gone.   The rear end could have a little value if it is high speed,  otherwise it is scrap.

 

Those Stutz wheel emblems would be worth more than the whole thing if they were usable or restorable. 

 

 

So, how do I determine if it's a high-speed rear? ...

I guess those wheel emblems are a 1928 year only? I have 3 emblems. The wheels are pretty rusty on the rims and spokes. Hubs are good! Looks like they can be restored with enough $$$. Something about those wheels just screams classy race car to me! I guess that's why I drove 4 hrs to pick them up. That may have been my lack of good judgement. 

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There are ratio numbers stamped in the casing.  Also you can do the wheel rotation trick.  You have about a 1 in 50 shot.

 

i would put the wheels on eBay, emblems separate and we can have a pool to see which brings more.  Rest is scrap.

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1 in 50... Worth a shot! I'll check when I get home. I probably won't scrap it. Couldn't say "I own a Stutz" if I did that. It'll just stay a fancy Farm trailer if nothing else. I like the idea of a Special build. It's a good looking chassis. I'm sure people have done more with less. Maybe?

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1 hour ago, Bad Boy Billy said:

 I'm sure people have done more with less. Maybe?

 

You would be in a small group for sure.  If you want a special,  I would suggest starting with more.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 7/4/2019 at 11:37 AM, alsancle said:

There are ratio numbers stamped in the casing.  Also you can do the wheel rotation trick.  You have about a 1 in 50 shot.

 

i would put the wheels on eBay, emblems separate and we can have a pool to see which brings more.  Rest is scrap.

I found a few numbers on the rear end. Are these what I'm looking for? Btw Alsancle, you car is amazing! I have spent alot of time reading your restoration page. You work is top notch.0711191721.thumb.jpg.f96a09b69d435759154ef3c0fca3e533.jpg

0711191722.jpg

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You need the CASTING numbers on the pumpkin. There are three different rear end set ups. I have the info at my office, which I will be back at in about ten days.

 

Also the casting numbers on the pinion collar.

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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There should be a flat square spot on the side of the carrier on the passenger side which will tell you the ratio.   The most common ratio is probably 4.5 : 1.    You'll have to take a wire brush to it to see it.      

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  • 4 months later...
On 7/4/2019 at 9:37 AM, alsancle said:

There are ratio numbers stamped in the casing.  Also you can do the wheel rotation trick.  You have about a 1 in 50 shot.

 

i would put the wheels on eBay, emblems separate and we can have a pool to see which brings more.  Rest is scrap.

 

Before I started selling off my 15 year accumulation of Vertical  8 parts a few years ago I would have instantly paid $2000.00 + for that chassis. So perhaps not scrap ! There may be someone else out there as Stutz mad as I was.

Finally got discouraged enough to sell my stuff. I guess too many people think of perfectly good parts as scrap. Alsancle where do you sell your scrap,  there might be a better market up here in the frozen North where a 27 Dodge is a rare vintage car and a Stutz is a SSJ.

It's grand to be able to shell out $75,000.00 to $100,000.00 on a "nice" Stutz, but the hobby is loosing the little guy's that are willing to devote many years and a smaller pile of $ to a vintage

car vision. If you guys in the mainstream keep scrapping what you think of as junk you are eliminating people from joining what is a shrinking fraternity.

 

Greg in Canada

 

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)
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Greg,  I'm just being realistic.    Anybody who buys that is just dreaming and will never own a whole car starting with that.

 

If somebody really want a Stutz,  there have been some decent usable BB & M sedans go in the 30-40k range.    That is the cheapest way there.

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I realise there are every now and then sedans in that range. And the most economical route. I had no interest in owning a sedan. I am perfectly capable of building a Robbins speedster replica body. And I would never take a decent stock sedan and re- body it.

As I said in the current type of  car guy thread , I am a sports car guy.  A Robbins style , vertical 8 based "special" is my ideal 1920's sports car. Blasphemy in this forum was my intent to use a GMC 270 for power rather than the Stutz 8 cyl. that is definitely out of my 

cost reach.  My parts are now with a good home in California. And I have given up on 1920's cars for the foreseeable future. Just way too rare in this part of the world except for Fords, Plymouths , Chevy's and Dodges. Nice but not my thing.

Perhaps in another 10 years once I age out of my Lola , and if demand for interesting 1920's cars falls off a bit I may re - awaken what was for many years a big interest. I dreamed about a Lola for about 40 years before it happened. Now I pinch myself every time I look at it.

Money from the Stutz parts are part of what made the Lola happen, perhaps in the future the reverse will happen.

Greg

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)
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My involvement with other areas of vintage vehicles ; vintage motorcycles, vintage race cars, has shown me that even the worst of the worst can eventually be restored.  Look at what people in the UK, New Zealand , Australia , and even Canada start with. Its not that they are masochist's, it's just that there are so few 

starting points available. And there is a big wealth gap between the people who can buy ready to use cars and many of the interested individuals in those economies .  Also if I had the $50,000 Cdn . that it would take to buy a $30,000 USD Stutz I as a retired person could not possibly justify to my wife spending it on an old car. However she never knows about or choses to overlook  the

$800.00 a month or so I spend on my projects.   Many of the best re - production vintage motorcycle parts come from New Zealand. Lots of interest , huge shipping charges, very few starting point machines. So a strong industry of building new

parts has sprung up over the last 20 years. Motor cycles and race cars  don't use many big forging's or major stampings like production cars do. So it is quite possible to build new , old vehicles.  A Stutz has several parts that are not feasible to re- produce, the frame, the front axle beam and spindles and the rear axle housing.  Almost anything else can be re - made.

That " scrap" chassis has all of those parts. Just add some money, a couple of decades of work and  desire. Not everyone can follow along on the direct path. Some don't have the payment for the toll bridges, so must take the much longer route.  It does not mean you are simply out of luck.

 

Greg

 

 

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Upon my retirement I did a considerable amount of soul searching. My life and $ resources up to that point had been split 4 ways, British Motorcycles, Vintage race cars, a couple of MGA road cars, Vintage American cars. Simply too much!

   Way too many directions, projects. I assume I have probably 20 years left for active hobby. Might be less but probably won't be more. So I decided that for the immediate 10 years vintage racing was the thing I would age out of first. So #1 priority.

 Sell all my project track cars and buy one nice one{ done , the Lola I bought last summer }. Sell all of my pile of British motorcycles and parts. Keep 1, but they are no longer nearly as important to me as 20 or 30 years ago. Sell all the American projects

except my 1912 Staver basket case.

Working on it. In 10 years have another reassessment , probably sell anything racing I own at that time as I will be in my 70's and too old. Look for the best 1920's vintage car I can find, and hopefully get a further 10 years hobby use . by then 80's and at that point who knows.

It will take lots of focus to follow my plan but I think I can do it. Mostly lots of selling, very little buying.

 

Greg

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