Jump to content

1932 Buick 50 Series steering gear help


Recommended Posts

Send me a pm with your address and I will send you a worm gear and shaft, a sector shaft and the best set of bearings and outer races that I have.  We'll negotiate a reasonable price plus shipping.

 

I collected all these parts  for my 32-58, not knowing what I might need.  Now I am happy to help others get their cars on the road.  I'm not in this as a business, I just want to recover my costs.

 

Bob Engle

Link to post
Share on other sites

You got it right.   That car must have driven through deep water and flooded the gearbox to get that much rust on the parts.  Most gear wear is from people switching to grease rather than gearlube.  I have seen a lot of boxes with zirk fittings on them instead of the square plug.  Use Cornhead grease when you get your gearbox back together.  It is thixatropic (spelling??).  grease like when static, but when it is stirred it flows like gear oil.

did you get the tube locating brass pieces out of the gearshaft?

Bob Engle

Link to post
Share on other sites

It did have a zirk fitting in the gear box.   From what I can tell the zirk was also bad.   Worm gear is it awful shape.   I did get the locating brass pieces out.  There was only one located in the center of the tube and then there was some sort of composite bushing located at the top of the shaft tube.   I looked very carefully and did not find any other locating brass.   From looking at the tube I could see where the one brass locator rides and could see where the upper bushing rode.   I didn't see any more wear spots on the throttle tube. 

 

Another item under review.

 

 When I had the car running some times I could hear the pinion on the starter dinging once in awhile on the flywheel.   Pulled the starter to inspect it and found that the return spring located on the starter engaging cross shaft is broken.  So the starter drive was not being fully retracted.   Another parts quest to find a spring that will work.    

Link to post
Share on other sites
53 minutes ago, o2zoom said:

It did have a zirk fitting in the gear box

We old guys will tell you that those zerk fittings have been the cause of many, if not most, of trashed steering boxes of 1920s and 1930s cars, and of flathead Cadillac water pumps through 1948.  You see, the "grease compressors" (usually one-hand, pistol grip) furnished with new cars were designed to dispense 600-W gear oil, NOT GREASE.  Further, the meaning of "grease" has changed:  600-W gear oil was called "liquid grease" or just "grease" when these cars were new.  To use the factory-provided tool, put the unit's female fitting against the zerk, push against the spring, and a fraction of an ounce of GEAR OIL is dispensed.  But in the last 60 years, "mechanics" and other well-meaning souls see the zerk and use a lever-operated CHASSIS GREASE gun to dispense CHASSIS GREASE at up to 3,000 psi, thereby blowing the seals so the box will no longer hold gear oil.  Further, CHASSIS GREASE channels away from the worm so the worm wears dramatically.  Substitute a plug for the steering box zerk, and save the zerk for installation only for judging.

Link to post
Share on other sites

When I first got my 32 Buick in 1998, I went through all the lubes and inspections.  When I started the engine for the first time, The starter return spring broke and the starter stayed engaged spinning the starter armature.  It through the windings out of the armature and into the field windings.  I went on a search and found another starter.  I was unable to find a suitable spring and I ended up winding and bending my own spring.  In 1932 the starter bendix was on straight splines and while there is an overrunning clutch in the bendix, it will not take a lot of overrunning.  before it will seize up.

 

On my 1917 Buick, I had to make a torsion spring for the brake return also.  You can get spring  manufactureres to reproduce the springs, but the price is astronomical for the setup costs.

 

Bob engle 

Link to post
Share on other sites

So I am restoring a 1931 Buick 60 series car and have been keenly following the steering gear portion of this and especially the recommendation to use "corn head grease" as a suitable lubricant for these old gears.  Bob Engle- is there a way to safely and thoroughly clean out whatever is in my gear which is mounted in the car with all the dressing without tearing it out and taking it apart before filling with the corn head grease?  I was able to find and order John Deere corn head grease on Amazon so I have that coming.  If I can do some PM to my gear which seems to be healthy and save it from disaster that would be a good thing I think...

 

Thanks

 

Dave

Edited by Str8-8-Dave (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites

There are 2 bolts that hold the bottom end plate on the main gearbox housing.  The tapped holes for these bolts are through holes.  The holes are partially obscured by the bottom timkin outer race, but part is open and if you flush with a a solvent or light weight oil it could flow out the bottom opening.  I don't know that it will do a lot of good.  there is not a lot of movement in the gear box that would agitate the old grease.  

 

To be technically correct, my spec and adjustments manual shows a square head plug, not a zirk fitting.  The plug has a flat on the side of the threads to act as a breather for the gearbox.   I believe the zirk fittings were added by owners and mechanics for ease of lubrication.

 

Bob Engle

Link to post
Share on other sites

Figured out what the mystery item was.  It was part of the tensioning for the throttle shaft at the end of the steering  column.  There is a spring and two end pieces that ride in the bore of the cast piece.  When I removed it one of the end pieces fell out.  Lucky to have found it on the floor.  I didn't realize what it was until I was cleaning up the parts I had removed earlier.  Thanks for you suggestion on what it was.  

Mystery part.JPG

Link to post
Share on other sites

Those are the screws that a commented on.  Unfortunately  I was incorrect.  The screw holes are partially covered by the bearing race, but the other portion of the hole does not go through to the inside of the casting.  It goes partway along the bearing race, but not far enough to use as a drain.  The only screw that could be used is the sector shaft adjustment screw.  Unfortunately that is not near the bottom of the gear housing.  Sorry for the error.

 

Bob Engle

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Steering update.    With the gracious help of mentor Bob I’m ready to start the rebuilding of my gear box.    All the components have been cleaned so will make the gasket for the box to flange and one for the sector shaft.   Waiting on John Deer corn-head grease.  Once that arrives I’ll assemble and dial in the proper settings.    

Steering Gear Parts.JPG

Link to post
Share on other sites

If that shaft moves laterally and you can feel it, the result will be slack at the steering wheel. I could feel and see no movement after bushing, although I didn't think to measure it. The steering box does get warm near the exhaust, but not that much. Anyway, does the opening in box expand more or less than the shaft, which are probably similar metals? I hope you teach me something here.

 

Whoops, you are saying the shaft is bigger than the bushes? Typo perhaps.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Update.  Steering gear was assembled and adjusted on the bench.  Cornhead grease was added and then clearances again checked.   Unit was re-installed in the car and I did a static test.  No more binding and all seems good rotating from lock to lock.   Continuing with other work so will road test when finish. 

IMG_3445.JPG

IMG_3440.JPG

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...