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1 hour ago, auburnseeker said:

It's not the snow,  it's the salt.  They use alot of it.  Everything around here is rusted in a few years.  It's the salt and they use alot of it.  Did I already mention something about the salt?   You get where I'm coming from?  Even my insane greasing, fluid filming, of the undercarriage and liberal doses of WD40 to everything under the hood,  rust still appears though much slower. 

 Try living in Halifax Nova Scotia. Right on the Atlantic. Sometimes in the winter along the coast the salt air and fog was so thick your wipers would just smear the salt. My taxi driver buddy used Coca-Cola splashed on the windshield to cut through it. Windshield washer fluid wouldn't do it. My folks bought a new 1970 Ford Custom 500 sedan that the side trim was gone from corrosion by 1973. I remember opening the trunk to get groceries out for my Mom in 1972 and you could hear the rusted metal falling inside the trunklid. The 1965 Ford Custom 500 they traded in on the 1970 had a rusted out frame to the point it was cracked and wouldn't pass Mandatory Provincial Safety Inspection. It was 5 years old!

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In  the winter of 1975-76 I drove my 1970 Plymouth 'Cuda. It was a triple black 383 Magnum, with power windows, leather int. power driver seat, black vinyl top. I had black  tape  over the holes in the front fenders  to hold the fender mount turn signal indicators on. This also kept the slush from coating the windshield every puddle I went through!

  The tape had to be redone often and before spring the indicators were gone. The rocker panel moulding fell off from rust behind and heavy slush build up. By April it was too far gone to bother fixing. Besides muscle cars were dirt cheap due to gas and insurance costs. I think I got $300 for it which I spent doing the body on my 1970 340 Duster.

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2 hours ago, Brooklyn Beer said:

Tell me about this stuff called salt...

 

It's like battery acid, liberally applied to the roads to try to fight Mother natures natural course of freezing standing water.  It's another one of those methods used to try to help bad drivers.  I prefer a snow packed road and a light dusting of sand on the corners and hills.

It was great driving my first winter beater on secondary roads when I was 18 treated that way.  Never had a problem piloting that 68 Pontiac Strato Chief sedan with a Chevy 6 and a powerglide.  I only got stuck once when I visited  My High School Math Teacher and pulled in his driveway,  only to find out he never plowed his driveway and just drove in and out two rutts with his Subaru.  Needless to say they didn't call those wide track Pontiacs For nothing. I bet the tire path of that Subaru was a good foot narrower.  Shoveled his Roof then had to go shovel the car out.  

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6 hours ago, mercer09 said:

When i had my 56 Chevy in the 80s,

 

me too! uncanny...................56 4 dr that needed a ring and valve job, so I sold it. should have kept it.

Ronn we keep crossing car paths!!  I had a 210 2 door.  Every kid into cars in high school late 70s wanted this car.  Original owner toyed with all of us but eventually sold to a guy who sold it to me around 83.  I had it in really nice shape, rebuilt engine, pro paint, chrome etc.  Swapped it for a vette that was a POS, but had to have it I guess... I need a Cord though to keep matching you.  🙂

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16 hours ago, auburnseeker said:

It's like battery acid, liberally applied to the roads to try to fight Mother natures natural course of freezing standing water.  It's another one of those methods used to try to help bad drivers.  I prefer a snow packed road and a light dusting of sand on the corners and hills.

It was great driving my first winter beater on secondary roads when I was 18 treated that way.  Never had a problem piloting that 68 Pontiac Strato Chief sedan with a Chevy 6 and a powerglide.  I only got stuck once when I visited  My High School Math Teacher and pulled in his driveway,  only to find out he never plowed his driveway and just drove in and out two rutts with his Subaru.  Needless to say they didn't call those wide track Pontiacs For nothing. I bet the tire path of that Subaru was a good foot narrower.  Shoveled his Roof then had to go shovel the car out.  

 Yes the Subaru is a narrower track. But your Canadian built Pontiac used the Chevrolet frame and axles, so they were not the same track as the USA built "Wide Track" frames.

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I need a Cord though to keep matching you.  🙂

 

nah, all of your cars have been in much better condition........... I would be so lucky as to have your discriminate taste. I buy anything that rolls.............lol

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21 hours ago, mercer09 said:

Shoveled his Roof then had to go shovel the car out.  

 

so that's how you got through HS............................................................

Well that was actually the year after I graduated.  He was a great Teacher though.  You know some teachers you dread their class,  his was interesting, but you still had to do the work.  He didn't give grades out for gifts.  Now one of my other High School math teachers was a terrible four letter word.  Probably made her mad I did so well in her class.  

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Man I had one of those and she showed up at our 20th reunion and I kindly let her know what she was and how many dreams she crushed of people back then. That she could not take a dirt nap soon enough. Oddly she did die some 2 years later and was buried 7 spaces over from my parents so when I go see the folks to have a beer and discuss life's issues I also stop and ask her if it's hot enough where she went.  She was that nasty of a hag.

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8 minutes ago, Brooklyn Beer said:

Oddly she did die some 2 years later and was buried 7 spaces over from my parents so when I go see the folks to have a beer and discuss life's issues I also stop and ask her if it's hot enough where she went.

Do you recycle your beer at her grave?

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On 12/30/2019 at 9:02 PM, Brooklyn Beer said:

I never looked at the hobby as only driving an old car from late April to mid September. What do you do the other half of the year? 

 

Good question. I drive my Stude all year unless it's raining or snowing. We don't get much snow here so it's usually not a problem to drive it at least once a week....

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Might be a little bit of a deal as you don't get much in a 30s car for 2500.  

I've seen alot worse for twice the money.  Twin sidemounts must be pretty rare on a 36 Dodge. 

Does have some floor rust but doesn't look terrible.  Older rehab on the interior is obvious.  Not sure is paint original?  You could polish it up alot I bet. 

https://newlondon.craigslist.org/cto/d/branford-1936-dodge-d2/7057964577.html

1936 dodge d2 sedan,complete car,needs total restoration.Wiring started,not running.call and leave message,i will return your call asap.

 

 

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It would be a shame to make it a parts car but boy if someone had a convertible and wanted dual sidemounts and needed many trim pieces, it would be a good one for that.  Still looks good enough to save and turn into a fun summer beater. 

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 1/28/2020 at 9:08 PM, classiclines said:

Does this latest Mopar qualify as a "woodie"?    Gotta love the door panels - lol - yes, looks like dry tinder....

s-l1600.jpg

 

 

They need to install a foosball table in that interior!

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Not my kind of car as far as style but I can really appreciate any clean looking car from this era.  Seems if someone was at all interested in this type of car,  this should be worth looking into. 

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1971 Ford Torino | eBay

Seems like a deal at a $7800 Buy It Now price, but who knows what issues it might have. The ad says it's solid, runs good and has a clear title. If those descriptions are true (and the seller's feedback is very good with other vehicles) then it looks promising. Interior looks good, too. Don't know if it's an actual factory muscle car or clone. If you live in the Pacific Northwest and like vintage Fords of this era, you might want to go for an inspection and see what the deal is. Two days left on the bidding so you might have some time.

 

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For some reason,  non Mustang Fords seem to get little love when compared to other muscle cars.  I have seen several that seem like deals that don't sell.  I guess the market isn't there.  That Cougar I posted seemed like a bargain all day long but didn't sell right away. 

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I agree it looks reasonable, but the interior is the weak point - dash skin, steering wheel, and I think incorrect upholstery.  All usable as is but some hit on value.  Torinos do seem good buys compared to the GM counterparts.

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We had a ‘73 Torino wagon - worst car I’ve ever been associated with (but I’ve never had a car out or the 80’s).  Maybe the two doors were better... maybe.  The ‘71 has similar interior design and brings back bad memories.  On the other hand, we put 450k+ miles on a ‘73 F100 - clutch at 200k and not too much else - possibly the last one with an oil bath air cleaner.  The ‘71 galaxy coupe was a great car too - but big.  You had to plan ahead so you had enough space to get out when you parked and opened those gigantic doors.

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A few thoughts. The '71 Ford Torino brings back some mixed memories for me. I actually wish I had the money, wouldn't mind having one myself (an unusual statement for me about a post WWII car!). One of my many cousins, one I was close to growing up, had a Torino way back when. His dad had been killed several years earlier in a plane crash, so my dad helped a lot with his and his brothers' upbringing. I shared my dad with my cousins. "R" had had a couple of nice fast-back (2+2) Mustangs, including one of the really early ones, and a '69 (as I recall?). The earlier one, was blue with white racing stripes, the '69, white with blue racing stripes. "R" was a bit of a wild youth, and manged to wreck both of those cars a few times, the earlier one (really makes one sick to think about it!) was totaled three times, and somehow put back together. The '69, only got totaled twice. The wrecks were always someone else's fault (uh-HUH), and somehow, in spite of all the tickets he also got, "R" managed to keep his license. Somewhere around '75, "R" (after totaling the '69 for the final time) got a Torino. He loved that car! No racing stripes. Didn't look quite the bad-boy car. But wow did it perform!  I rode with him in it once, going home from a big family gathering. The Santa Cruz mountains between us and home, he drove reasonably well (always wanted me to think he was a good kid, I was a strange kid and already had a model T by then). But just to show me what the car could do. Going up a long steep stretch of mountain highway, we were doing about 50 mph (the speed limit on that dangerous section of highway), and he floored it! Within seconds, we were doing 80 mph! (Uphill!) Then he back off back to the speed limit.

I pretended I wasn't impressed.

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Hi there C Carl! Yes "R" did survive that wild youth. At about the time of the "ride", he started his own company, spun off from a mutual friend's business in which he had a few differences of opinion, and is still running that company today with the help of his son. I wouldn't say  his personal life is one I could ever be proud of (won't go into details), but he is basically an alright guy, good to deal with business-wise, and I do still see him occasionally. He even played around with antique automobiles for a few years, had a horseless carriage for awhile, as well as one of the very few early T-birds with a Ford factory installed Paxton supercharger (I think he lost that one in his divorce).

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