marcapra

Painting strategy and cost.

Recommended Posts

Jeff, you make a point that some people do not recognize.  If an owner asks a reputable shop to do less than a perfect paint job then that has a chance to ruin the reputation of the shop.  That is why most quality professional restorers will not take on a job that compromises their standards.  It is simply not worth hearing "XYZ shop did that job??!!  I sure won't ever take my car there!".

 

Whether it is a $200,000 job or a home sprayed job there is room for both kinds of efforts.  Unlike the early years I spent in a body shop, paint runs and problems were a disaster.  Today's paints are more forgiving and wet sanding takes care of a lot of issues.  Everyone is right though about the prep being super important ,and virtually anyone can handle that task.  Lots of very acceptable paint jobs are done at "home" these days.  Our director of the AACA Library learned at home and did a very acceptable job on his 37 Buick.

 

Good luck to the original poster and have fun.  Spraying paint is a very satisfying activity.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would never recommend going to a shop, that does perfect work, and asking for less.  Their less, if that would even possible, in the grand scheme of things, would still be very high.  I recommend asking around for a good painter, checking out some cars that he/she has done, and choose accordingly.  I found a guy that used to work at a major local shop.  He went out on his own, to a smaller space, and is now quickly growing. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think one of our local painters was moonlighting. His day job was singing.

Ray.thumb.jpg.df7a5f04d1d6720d3a16c19b4ec676e0.jpg

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Restorer32 said:

The paint gun we use now cost nearly as much as we charged for a paint job back in the day.

Yep.  I paid $700 for a lacquer job back in 1981.  You can easily drop that on a gun these days.

 

And truth be told, that might be the biggest thing standing between a DIYer and a $200,000 paint job.  A good gun will save you hours of sanding, buffing. etc.  It's worth scraping together every penny you can afford to get the best gun you can.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Up to 40-plus hours of final wet sanding and compounding is discussed in this video. He says only 10 hours is adequate for "driver quality."

 

The link jumps you ahead in the video to the wet sanding part.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

First overall paint jobs we did as young teenagers were with a Electrolux Vacumn Cleaner with a spray attachment.  It was in the garage of a house our parents bought along with lots of household enamels.  Yes i t looked like stucco an faded quickly, but we got lots of practice.

Remember in the 60's a Fac-O-Bake paint job was $29.95.

Second system was a Navy surplus Crosley compressor with s cheap spray gun.  Got a better job but still some orange peal.

Next was a used Binks Jam gun and a Sears 20 gallon  air compressor, used lacquer and buffed out the errors.

Next  better compressor and the Binks with acrylic enamel.   Great combination!

Next, the the rebuild kit for the Binks cost more than a cheap Pro gun.

HVLP guns from Harbor Freight, both Jam & Overall took over.

While I've not done a overall job yet, I have done fenders, wheels Skirts & interiors. I still like the $9.99 HVLP Jam gun  the best.

Edited by Paul Dobbin (see edit history)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
14 hours ago, marcapra said:

Can HVLP guns be used with a regular air compressor?  If I decide to go with the turbo system, what is the difference between a 3 stage and a 4 stage?  

There are two gun systems. The HVLP set-up sold by TP Tools and others has no compressor & tank. It blows air continuously through the gun. This is a "bleeder" gun, as it shoots air out all the time (with paint added when you squeeze the trigger). This can be a pain if you lay it near some dust while painting. The warm air, however, keeps your paint dry. The other HVLP gun type uses a standard tank air compressor and sprays air through the gun only when the trigger is pulled. These two systems, while they are both HVLP,  require different guns.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I'd guess most pros are now using an HVLP gun as it has less overspray.

 

Phil

Edited by MochetVelo (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When we started restoring in 1979 lacquer primer was $11/gal and black lacquer paint was $22/gal. Decent quality paint now is from $400-900/gal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember back in the early 80s I painted my 50 Chrysler with the original type of paint, Dulux enamel.  You can't get that now because acrylic enamels are superior!  I remember, back then, I knew a woman who owned an old VW bug.  She painted it herself!, using a house painter's brush and white latex paint.  you could see the brush strokes!  But I don't advise this method to today's  DIY's.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am not a good painter. Not many really are. That has made me pay very close attention to paint jobs over the years. It has been my observation that a $4,000 to $10,000 paint job can add about $1,000 to the value of a car. The best buys in project cars come from painters who can't make them run right. Always try to buy the finished paint job.

Bernie

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Likewise an engine rebuild is an even bigger disappointment in return.  A car with good paint and no engine,  will sell faster than a car with perfect mechanicals and receipts to back it up but bad paint. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, 60FlatTop said:

It has been my observation that a $4,000 to $10,000 paint job can add about $1,000 to the value of a car. The best buys in project cars come from painters who can't make them run right.

 

16 hours ago, auburnseeker said:

Likewise an engine rebuild is an even bigger disappointment in return.  A car with good paint and no engine,  will sell faster than a car with perfect mechanicals and receipts to back it up but bad paint. 

 

IOW, it doesn't make sense to spend money on an old car. :D 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thought people may be interested in an amateur job being performed by me in my 2 car garage.  If I get an invitation to Pebble Beach I would attend though I didn't spend outrageous money to restore my 1915 McLaughlin-Buick.  I did try to paint the car in correct colours, I was dismayed to find the bonnet was to be black, that was a new style popular for a short time, but now I love the look.  Presently the fenders are painted in a single stage urethane and have been wet sanded with 2000 grit sandpaper, ready for the next step of machine compounding and polishing.  I did blow the budget on nickel plating, it is beautiful.  In front of the car is the garage it was painted in.

 

Regards, Gary

 

DSC_1001.JPG

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...