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I assume you’re sure all the bolts are off?  There are several hidden under there that are easy to miss - I’ve done it myself.  If they’re all off the manifold may be rusted to the studs.  Maybe good penetrating oil and a little heat?

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When I used to take apart Ford flatheads we used to have heads stuck on we would get some thin wall tubing where the inside diameter fit over the stud and cut teeth into the end.  We the chucked it in the drill and ran it down the stud cutting it loose.  

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None of the holes are usually a tight fit. These normally just come straight off with ease. check again for hidden bolts/nuts. Even if gasket sealant of some kind was used, it should pull off. Try running a putty knife around all flanges.

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On 6/30/2019 at 10:05 AM, knobless said:

Removed all the bolts ,thought it would come off easily, ( others have ). what’s the secret? Want to take it off in 1 pc ,because I know the small bolts that connect them will break, for sure!

 

CFE0AAC1-3BF5-45C7-BD0E-672C34FDDC35.jpeg

 

 

Any luck ? You've had some good suggestions here so my guess is you had success

Edited by 30DodgePanel (see edit history)
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I had a battle with the exhaust manifold on my '36 dodge. The problem is the two long studs that go through the manifold into the block. They get rusted solid into the manifold and are VERY difficult to release. The rusted studs swell up with scale filling the hole through the manifold and won't move. My exhaust manifold was broken into 3 pieces by the reman people trying to get it off the engine block so we could get it rebuilt. Those exhaust manifolds are not that easy to find any more and if you do they are pricey. Take your time and realize why the manifold is stuck. I finally was able to get a replacement that was from an M37 3/4 ton Military vehicle from about 1954. They use the same part number up into the 1950s if you do enough research. Part/casting number is 620854 If you are unlucky enough to need it for reference (presuming you have a 218 cu in engine). The number is on the bottom side of the exhaust manifold.

With all this as preamble, I don't have an easy solution to this problem. I hope someone else has a good way of getting that rust to break free. Best of luck. I hope you can get it off ok.

Edit - I just looked at Jan Arnett(2)'s suggestion above. I don't know if you can get a straight shot at those long studs but if you can find a thin wall tube and make a cutter as he suggests, it might clear the scale and release the manifold.

Edited by 36 D2 Coupe
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I missed Jan Arnett's description of his method but it's exactly what I thought to do.  So long as the fit between the stud and hole is relatively loose you should find some thinwall tubing (like 5/16" fuel line steel tubing?) and file some crude notches in the business end to act as teeth to loosen the rust between the stud and the manifold.

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Tube method should work, also have often found heating and chilling (with water) helps, particularly if you can work out which studs are stuck. Heat stud and area of manifold directly adjacent to it, get stud red hot.  Use oxy torch or similar. Then chill with water and let it cool down completely. May require a couple of attempts. If you need a few attempts, it may not do the stud much good, but if it is that bad you may need to replace the stud anyway. See what it looks like when you get it apart. Good luck. John

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We have one at word and it works great.  Or should I say *worked* great.  Until some bonehead kept it energized too long and melted it.  Of course no one knows what happened.  I work with second grade mentality adults.

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2 hours ago, knobless said:

Nice to finally have a garage and a place to work, really like my roll around horses with shelf’s and wrench holders,,,

THAT is why I just cleared out my own garage. I was SO tired of stumbling over everything. That chassis is looking GREAT!

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If the shaft on that shock is still good, you can rebuild it yourself for a few bucks.  Even if the shaft is bad, you can still do it with a sleeve. Detailed explanation in my thread The Resurrection Of Daphne.

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22 minutes ago, Taylormade said:

If the shaft on that shock is still good, you can rebuild it yourself for a few bucks.  Even if the shaft is bad, you can still do it with a sleeve. Detailed explanation in my thread The Resurrection Of Daphne.

I ll take a look thanks 

 

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1 hour ago, Spinneyhill said:

So do I! I was just thinking it was the shop of a person more capable with wood than steel.

Carpenter by trade still learning the steel thing, 36 dodge 4 dr rear arm rest all steel and a picture I stumbled on of a late friends Cord, beautiful car, don’t you think?

83414241-78C0-4479-9662-A6464E13E959.jpeg

BC4E87E8-1EC1-457F-B172-6A5592499AE9.jpeg

037D1E49-F873-4130-A5B5-C0AB6C9C218E.jpeg

Edited by knobless (see edit history)
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On 7/7/2019 at 5:32 PM, Taylormade said:

If the shaft on that shock is still good, you can rebuild it yourself for a few bucks.  Even if the shaft is bad, you can still do it with a sleeve. Detailed explanation in my thread The Resurrection Of Daphne.

This is the one with the two arms coming off it, wasn’t your rebuild single ? Or if you did one where can I find the post thanks.

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Your front shock absorbers are apparently double acting. The Dodge Brothers 8 had double acting shock absorbers. Maybe they are similar.

 

If you search this forum you should find a link to the patent. Stooey, I think, posted some pictures of taking his down. 

 

Two arms? Do you mean one from the shock absorber and a vertical arm down to the hub?

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Now I see what you mean. Here is a reference - MoToR's 1928-35. This should download a pdf file.

restorecarsclassifieds.com/wiki/show_pdf.pdf?n=4973

 

MoToR 1947 has information on the 1935-36 Dodge shock absorber. If it is useful I can copy it for you.

Edited by Spinneyhill (see edit history)
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