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A little late, almost back together, planning on turning it over Friday, that's what I said two months ago.

Do these timing marks look OK? more concerned about the cam marks, I believe they are supposed to be very slightly below the top of the head, these are about even with it.

also, a quick question, who made the 16V block ( i should know this)

 

THANKS

        Peter

20190611_123759.jpg

20190611_123810.jpg

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Posted (edited)

It would appear that you have it set correctly. However, I would suggest you rotate the crankshaft by hand 2 full rotations, then reinspect the marks to verify that they still line up.

You alone can be the final word here, as you are there and we are stuck looking at a photograph. I have to wonder why the crankshaft pulley bolt is not in place? This is the means by which you should rotate the crankshaft in making your judgement as to correct or incorrect. Did you hold the camshafts 'PINNED IN PLACE' as the manual shows? If so, it looks like you have it set properly.

IMG_2619.thumb.JPG.4ba1e19c608c4ed7ae7d4124ebae3c65.JPG  

Edited by Hemi Dude
Removed sender’s photo to clarify my reply. (see edit history)
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To your other question: The engine block is a Chrysler manufactured block, similar to the engine blocks in all the other vehicles, but specifically cast and machined for 16v use.

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It looks right, but I suggest following Hemi's advice.

 

Yes, the block is a Chrysler block. Depending on when it was cast, it could be either an early "non-commonblock" or the later "commonblock". There are 2 easy ways to tell which it is: if the rear oil pan rail is straight between the bolt holes on the firewall side or if it lacks a fuel pump block-off plate on the water pump side of the block it is a commonblock. It's important to know for the front main seal, oil pan gasket, oil pan, oil pick-up, and crankshaft, but there's not really any benefit or detriment either way.

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Posted (edited)
On 6/27/2019 at 11:52 AM, Reaper1 said:

It looks right, but I suggest following Hemi's advice.

 

Yes, the block is a Chrysler block. Depending on when it was cast, it could be either an early "non-commonblock" or the later "commonblock".

308774044_16Vengine-front.JPG.16bed61ac11a26e70afdac0b11308444.JPG 

Here is a 16V 'Early Block' engine. You can see the difference in the front seal retainer between the 2 engines, so Peter's is a 'Common Block' engine. 304797720_16Vengine-front14.JPG.8e1fd911950613a91a2389eb0f9466de.JPG

Edited by Hemi Dude
Eliminating duplication (see edit history)

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Ah, I didn't know that the picture above was of the OP's engine.

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Reaper1, what do you mean by your comment above. Who is OP?

The 2 photos I enclosed is an engine I built for a customer years ago, to show what the early Block looks like on a 16v engine.

Ah, I didn't know that the picture above was of the OP's engine.

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OP = Original Poster

 

Yes, I realized your pictures were of the same early engine. I didn't catch that the picture above that of the crank sprocket was of the actual engine in question, not an example.

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