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Long term storage of car outside


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I have a Model A Fordor, so it is an enclosed car, but also, components are wood.

 

My obstacles in the old car hobby is that I am self taught, which isn't saying much, but I can putter about and figure out some things.

 

The other problem is storage space.  I do have a 2005 Volkswagen Golf sitting in the driveway that I have kept despite having some rather pesky problems, because it has less than 140,000 miles on it.  But it has minimal value.

 

I have the Model A for sale, and I really do not want to sell it, but it is probably in the best interest of the car.

 

But, if I got rid of the VW instead, and kept the Model A in the driveway, on an asphalt surface, what are the long term implications?  Ideally under a tarp, but I'm afraid my wife or the neigbors will consider that to be unsightly.

 

I think ALL vehicles, even new ones, when not driven, should be under cover.  But that's a problem.  I considered my limited garage space a temporary obstacle...

 

Except, has anyone tried to look for real estate lately in the Allentown suburbs?  Although by no means nothing like areas such as NYC and Seattle, it is still an obstacle.  Properties with barns or lots of garage space are few in number, and then when they are available, given they are usually better than a property with fewer outbuildings and less land, the cost is prohibitive, at least on my salary.

 

?????

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It will go to hell fast.  Outside storage is terrible unless you live in the desert.  Even then the sun eats up the finishes.  Persistent moisture will get in between fender welting and unsealed areas then everything will blossom out with rust and peeling paint.  Under the tarp unless very carefully secured and in such a manner that it doesn't contact the metal anywhere and air can circulate around the car,  will accelerate decomposition as it can never dry out and any sweating will be trapped under surfaces where the tarp touches the car. 

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The reason your newer car isn't crusting up in the driveway,   is they are sealed better and have better finishes to combat against the elements. 

I noticed the exterior finishes on your car are starting to fail now.   They will be escalated with outside storage. 

Edited by auburnseeker (see edit history)
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Good to hear you are considering keeping the car....... :)

Unfortunately the above replies are correct about outdoor storage.

One of the reasons I had for waiting so long to get into cars at all was lack of indoor storage.

I had a pole building put up but at that time it was for housing vintage (very old) tractors so there was no room anyway.

Any time you're dealing with a lot of sun and weather extremes is not a good situation especially for car with a fair amount of body wood........ :wacko:

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 I think how they hold up depends on where you live (humidity, elevation, salt water). Also, paint color. I live at 5000’+ and in low humidity area. I have eight vehicles that stay outside year around. 3 or 4 go under car covers in the winter because they are not driven on winter roads.

 I tend to keep vehicles forever. Of the outside vehicles, I’ve owned the oldest for over 50 years and the newest for 12 years. All are light colored with the exception of a 1970 cj5 Jeep which is bright red. I painted the Jeep with acrylic in 91 or 92 and it’s starting to fade. It’s on the “to do” list to paint and I’ll clear it this time. Paint is good on all the others. I keep them waxed and maintained especially rubber trim 

  I’ve never had a problem with rust, rot, mold, varmits, and ect., but all my vehicles are steel, no wood.

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We just had erected a three car metal carport, to add storage. Vary happy with the quality and really the whole process. Mary wanted to find out if there was a required permit-she got a yes/no answer, yes they are permitted type of structure but King Co. (Seattle area) was not issuing them. The work putting it up only took three hours. This was a week before an unprecedented, extremely late, and heavy February snowfall (33") so we had a chance to test it almost immediately.  

 

If  you have room to park a car you have room for one of these. The three car style that we had erected cost about $2600, we wanted quality, but and we could have found one for less.

Edited by Buffalowed Bill (see edit history)
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Thank you for your answers.  Unfortunately, they were, was expected.  The car, sadly, must be sold.  Best interest of the car.

 

The wonderful yuppy neighborhood I live in will not allow car ports, so that is not an option.  It would be only a matter of time before I will receive complaints if I kept it under a tarp, which was the only viable option, and that doesn't seem to be a good one, as from responses above.

 

At the end of every rainbow is a pot of gold.  In this case, the good news is that if I ever want another Model A someday, they are not incredibly rare, and I will be able to find another one, if desired.

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I should have also stated the not so obvious...

 

Junkyards full of old cars answer pretty well my question.  It's obvious that being exposed to the elements leads to significant decay.

 

But, the reason for my question was that, unlike most junkyards, which are on bare earth, my car was going to be parked on an asphalt surface.  As already discussed, the car cannot be outside long term...hence, the reason it's for sale.

 

I was hoping that the cause of rust and decay might be from the moisture of the earth and being parked on asphalt might minimize this.

 

My observations led to this hypothesis.  Stored originally in dry barn.  No real problems.  Problems arose once holes in roof developed, but not upwards due to being under tarp.  Seems like water from holes in roof caused moisture to seek the lowest level and then evaporate, causing superficial rust, such as on the manifold.  Amazingly, muffler and tail pipe look brand new, just as replaced in 2016.

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2 hours ago, mrcvs said:

I should have also stated the not so obvious...

 

Junkyards full of old cars answer pretty well my question.  It's obvious that being exposed to the elements leads to significant decay.

 

But, the reason for my question was that, unlike most junkyards, which are on bare earth, my car was going to be parked on an asphalt surface.  As already discussed, the car cannot be outside long term...hence, the reason it's for sale.

 

I was hoping that the cause of rust and decay might be from the moisture of the earth and being parked on asphalt might minimize this.

 

My observations led to this hypothesis.  Stored originally in dry barn.  No real problems.  Problems arose once holes in roof developed, but not upwards due to being under tarp.  Seems like water from holes in roof caused moisture to seek the lowest level and then evaporate, causing superficial rust, such as on the manifold.  Amazingly, muffler and tail pipe look brand new, just as replaced in 2016.

I had a friend who installed over sized French doors in his house so he could keep his 1921 RR Ghost in his living room. How open minded is your spouse?

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being Allentown area- I would certainly look for a garage rental from a little old lady from Pasadena..........

 

I would wager it could be had for 75. a month, which many will dispute, but Allentown is kind of out a bit..........

 

an A can fit in a very small garage.

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People like you are how the hobby started.Not everyone had a garage/workshop to work in.I would rather have a car ,sitting on a paved drive,with a QUALITY fitted car cover  at your home than at  a storage garage miles away.A lot of us started out working on the driveway.Perhaps the perfect garage will turn up in the future,till then work on it and have FUN

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31 minutes ago, Restorer32 said:

How open minded is your spouse?

 

Mine was pretty decent until she smelled the high temperature paint on the manifolds curing in the oven.

 

We moved the washer and dryer into a new laundry room upstairs and she has no idea there is a Dynafow transmission in the cellar.

 

I can't help imagining the conversation:

"Dear, if there was a Ghost in the house....... would you be uncomfortable?"

"They won't hurt you."

"My thoughts, exactly!"

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Cellar ? We have indoor swimming pools. Have been living in the same development with an HOA & sidewalks for 35 years. Half of garage doors face back yard (and flowthrough in back garage is nice when warmish out). Key is that very little is observable from the street and have 12 feet between side of my house and fence. Kept my 27' Travel Trailer on a 10x25 pad in the "grotto" (pollen/sap is not an issue with a good cover) and not visible from sidewalk. If needful have a 10x20 foot HF "portable" garage but still in box.

 

Is best to get permits and work with an HOA, even better if help with their cars.

 

Took 30 of the 35 years to get everything in place but 2000 sq ft house and 2000 sq ft of garages in a resort (about 4 miles to Orlando's "Restaurant Row") suits.

ingrotto.jpg

 

ps is possible to create a storage pad from 18x18" 2" pavers from Home Depot. Can see paver under hitch jack - are some more under trailer tires on pad for good drainage.

 

 

 

 

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At one time Costco sold a covered temporary garage and they may still sell it but I haven't looked. I bought one and it really worked out until I could get a real garage for a new car addition. It was a metal pole framework covered by a tan tarp. Due to the sun and Santa Ana winds I replaced the cover once after about a year and a half. I was able to mostly hide it from the street and neighbors so there were no problems.

 

Dave

31 new rad.jpg

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Drainage is key to preserving the underside from rusting out.  Water that pools under the car hastens the formation of rust so look at the area the car will be stored to ensure it drains properly.

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4 hours ago, TerryB said:

Drainage is key to preserving the underside from rusting out.  Water that pools under the car hastens the formation of rust so look at the area the car will be stored to ensure it drains properly.

Right!  I suspected as much but fortunately my driveway slopes towards the road.

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10 hours ago, padgett said:

Try this.

I can't.

 

America, the land of the free, ain't so free anymore.

 

As America got way, way, way too crowded, you end up with too many (nosy) neighbors and restrictions.

 

That's why I am selling this car.

 

I knew that when I bought this place, so it's not like it's any surprise.  A stone farmhouse with, at a minimum, a new kitchen needed and additional cosmetic work, with an awesome barn and ten acres is a hard sell when, for less, you can get a brand new house on 0.27 acres ready to move into.  Well, not for me.  Guess which one I wanted.  With my wife breathing down my neck, and the in-laws and some of her siblings telling me what a dope I was, I wasn't going to win that argument.

 

I will say that place would have been the maximum my budget could have afforded, and I would have had no money left over for renovations, and some folks can't live with outdated kitchens and cosmetics.  Oh, yeah, I recall now it needed a brand new roof as well.

Edited by mrcvs (see edit history)
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3 hours ago, Roger Walling said:

 That would make an excellent dust cover for indoor storage. Better than a car cover, no scratching or wear problems.

 And the price is right!

It would seem that the reviews are mixed, difficult to assemble, and weak materials.

Also says the duct tape helps to keep it together.

However the indoor idea seems plausible.

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I started out with a Model A at the age of 13, and have fought the storage space battle my whole life.  I have done tarps, lean-to, carport, car cover, storage units, rental garage, you name it.   Given limited ground space and budget, I would recommend the solution offered above by Dave39MD if available.  I hope you find a way. I hope you keep the passion alive.   The Model A was one of the best cars ever concieved IMHO.  Good luck!

 

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On 6/23/2019 at 7:25 AM, mrcvs said:

I knew that when I bought this place, so it's not like it's any surprise.  A stone farmhouse with, at a minimum, a new kitchen needed and additional cosmetic work, with an awesome barn and ten acres is a hard sell when, for less, you can get a brand new house on 0.27 acres ready to move into.  Well, not for me.  Guess which one I wanted.  With my wife breathing down my neck, and the in-laws and some of her siblings telling me what a dope I was, I wasn't going to win that argument.

 

Just curious when you say Allentown suburbs did that include looking south of Emmaus in the Bally, Boyertown and Oley areas?

As you probably know, the Allentown area is basically the bedroom community for Northern NJ and NYC. That has what has driven home prices in that area for the last 10-15+ years.

 

The area I mentioned above may have homes in your price range without restrictions and more land. Unfortunately, I get the impression that this would not be an option with the wife being used to a "new" home or a longer work commute distance.

 

 

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Depends on where you put it. I have a Leader cover I use when a car needs to go in the grotto for a few days.

 

Forgot to mention but a half dozen moth balls scattered under the hood can hep to reduce being a rodent meal.

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Have you considered a pre-built garage?  They are delivered to your home, fully built, and rolled of a truck onto your concrete pad or even a simple gravel foundation.  A friend of mine who lives on a modest suburban lot in the outskirts of Baltimore, purchased one several years ago and was very happy with it. The floor was plywood, and it looked very nice.  Not a lot of room to work on the car, of course (unless you order a deluxe model), but it protects your car and is less expensive than having a garage built.

 

Here's a place in Parkesburg, Pa.. https://waterloostructures.net/garage-classic.php  You can get a modest sized one (10' x 16'), painted wood siding, for around $3600 and for more money you can get larger and fancier ones.

 

There are probably quite a number of these places in the Allentown area.

 

These are permanent structures.  Unlike a carport or vinyl structure, the neighbors wouldn't complain.  And it would actually add value to your home.  Of course, then your taxes would go up...

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1 hour ago, Jon37 said:

Have you considered a pre-built garage?  They are delivered to your home, fully built, and rolled of a truck onto your concrete pad or even a simple gravel foundation.  A friend of mine who lives on a modest suburban lot in the outskirts of Baltimore, purchased one several years ago and was very happy with it. The floor was plywood, and it looked very nice.  Not a lot of room to work on the car, of course (unless you order a deluxe model), but it protects your car and is less expensive than having a garage built.

 

Here's a place in Parkesburg, Pa.. https://waterloostructures.net/garage-classic.php  You can get a modest sized one (10' x 16'), painted wood siding, for around $3600 and for more money you can get larger and fancier ones.

 

There are probably quite a number of these places in the Allentown area.

 

These are permanent structures.  Unlike a carport or vinyl structure, the neighbors wouldn't complain.  And it would actually add value to your home.  Of course, then your taxes would go up...

They are all over the place here in Lancaster County PA.  When I purchased my 10x16 shed they recommended placing it on gravel so the rainwater would drain off and keep wood rot to a minimum.  Pine Creek structures is a big manufacturer of these along with numerous Amish craftsmen who have businesses all around here.

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On 06/24/2019 at 12:50 PM, charlier said:

 

Just curious when you say Allentown suburbs did that include looking south of Emmaus in the Bally, Boyertown and Oley areas?

As you probably know, the Allentown area is basically the bedroom community for Northern NJ and NYC. That has what has driven home prices in that area for the last 10-15+ years.

 

The area I mentioned above may have homes in your price range without restrictions and more land. Unfortunately, I get the impression that this would not be an option with the wife being used to a "new" home or a longer work commute distance.

 

 

Exactly!

 

Due to Route 22 and 78 traffic getting worse than ever (and the Eye 22 bridge project never seems to get done), we are as far out as she wants to be.  Unless maybe Saucon Valley, but that ain't cheap, either.

 

It's unfortunate NYC and NJ transplants have ruined it out here.  Many live in my neighborhood and bring their big city attitudes with them.

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On 06/24/2019 at 3:08 PM, Jon37 said:

Have you considered a pre-built garage?  They are delivered to your home, fully built, and rolled of a truck onto your concrete pad or even a simple gravel foundation.  A friend of mine who lives on a modest suburban lot in the outskirts of Baltimore, purchased one several years ago and was very happy with it. The floor was plywood, and it looked very nice.  Not a lot of room to work on the car, of course (unless you order a deluxe model), but it protects your car and is less expensive than having a garage built.

 

Here's a place in Parkesburg, Pa.. https://waterloostructures.net/garage-classic.php  You can get a modest sized one (10' x 16'), painted wood siding, for around $3600 and for more money you can get larger and fancier ones.

 

There are probably quite a number of these places in the Allentown area.

 

These are permanent structures.  Unlike a carport or vinyl structure, the neighbors wouldn't complain.  And it would actually add value to your home.  Of course, then your taxes would go up...

HOA won't allow that.  Socialism.

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9 hours ago, mrcvs said:

Take home message here.  If you like old cars, avoid neighborhoods.

 

Also a good idea to avoid your wife...for awhile...

 

I'm one of the lucky ones I guess.

My wife never ONCE questioned any of my numerous tractor purchases or sales or where I was many many many nights working after hours on my antique tractors.

There are plenty of worse places I could have been and she knew it. 

She even came to call the tractors my iron ladies.

That was not only greatly appreciated by me but wound up quite beneficial to both of us when I turned one tractor into a new house for us.

I didn't REALLY want to sell that one but she deserved it (and I wanted that house too).

 

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Also a good idea to avoid your wife...for awhile...

 

 

I moved mine to Upstate NY for quite awhile now. I can have as many cars as I want and nobody bothers me.............

 

that's called- peace of mind!

 

I live in NJ- close enough!

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