Jump to content

Canadian Chryco 25” Engine Parts


Recommended Posts

Hi folks. It turns out I have a Mopar D54-xxxxx SN engine here. 25” long block. Made in Canada. 4 ½” stroke. Have not had the head off yet but I’d wager its got a 3 ⅜” bore. Netting 228 ci. Likely came from a 1955 Dodge Royal or similar Canadian car. 

 

Most replacement engine parts listings are for American built Mopar engines. I am having trouble locating engine parts lists for my 228. 

 

Internet research tells me Chryco only offered the 25” block. They changed bore and stroke to accomodate power needs for each application. They got the same block down to a 201 ci, and as large as a 265 ci.  I suspect distributor, cap, rotor, points, condenser, stuff may be the same accross the Canadian line up from around 52 to 55 in the 6 cylinder flat head offerings. 

 

Can anyone help with confirming this or straightening me out on this?  For example Bernbaum lists tons of parts for mass produced American Mopar engines. I don’t see parts listed for the Canadian 228 engine. Thanks. 

 

Keith

Link to post
Share on other sites

The Canadian branch of the Chrysler corporation got their own engine foundry in 1938. It made one engine only, the 25" long block used in American DeSoto and Chrysler cars. To get engines suitable for Plymouth and Dodge they reduce the bore to 3 3/8 from 3 7/16 and juggled the bore and stroke to get the displacement they wanted. They made crankshafts from 4 1/16 to 4 3/4 stroke. Each crankshaft had its own connecting rods of suitable length, the pistons were all the same. In other words if your engine has a 3 3/8 bore it uses the same piston as any other 3 3/8 bore engine, regardless of stroke. Likewise for the 3 7/16 bore. This means you can bore your 3 3/8 engine 1/16 oversize and use stock DeSoto/Chrysler pistons. Your engine with 3 7/16 bore and 4 1/2 stroke is equal to a 251 engine used in Chrysler, DeSoto, and Dodge trucks. The only larger option would be a 4 3/4 stroke crank which would give a 265 engine but these crankshafts are rather rare.

 

Distributors alike and interchangeable but they changed the design every few years so points and cap don't interchange across the board. Distributors had specific part numbers for specific engines, so they probably tailored the advance curve for each engine. Model of distributor appears in the serial number plate rivetted to the distributor, good to know when ordering parts. Especially if someone swapped in a junkyard distributor years ago.

 

Same engine used in Plymouth, Dodge, DeSoto and Chrysler cars, Dodge trucks, industrial and marine applications 1938 - 1972. Dodge Power Wagon Canadian military vehicles used the 251 engine up to 1972 and so did some heavy Dodge trucks to 1962. A lot of them were used in Massey combines and tractors, so if you see an old combine rotting away in a fence row check it out.

 

Parts like points, condenser, rotor, cap, bearings, fan belts etc etc should be available from your local auto parts store. Look for the one where the farmers shop, with an old gray haired or bald headed guy behind the counter. The shiny new place by the mall run by a kid with purple hair and a snot ring, probably won't be much help.

Edited by Rusty_OToole (see edit history)
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Check out Vintage Power Wagons, they have warehouses full of NOS parts and used parts for Power Wagons, and they used the same flathead engine for years. Last I looked they had NOS pistons in various oversizes for $65 a set of six, how good do you want it?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks @Rusty_OToole for that education session. I checked out Vintage Power Wagons on-line catalog.  I like the  options shown. When the time comes around for rebuild it looks like I have some good options.  I'll get my head off the engine at some point and measure bore to confirm.

 

Assuming it is stock at 3 3/8" (I have already confirmed my bore is 4 1/4") and I bore it over 1/16" to 3 7/16", you're spot on, Power Wagons have several piston options for me.  Quick math; with my 4 1/4"  stroke x 3 7/16"  bore, my new displacement would end up around 236.6 C.I.

 

My 228 C.I. engine is currently in a 1938 P6 Plymouth Deluxe sedan. The car originally had a 201 C.I. engine. It's a light little car with a 3 speed. The final 236 sized engine with the right fuel delivery and timing would give that little car some nice torque and HP gains I bet.

Edited by keithb7 (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites

The 237 cu in engine you mention, is the same size used in DeSoto 1946 to 1950 models. It should make your Plymouth scoot along real nice. Those engines are foolers, and will continue to run without protest in an advanced state of decay and wear. I know guys who rebuilt the engine in their flathead Plymouths, Dodges etc and were very impressed with the new found horsepower and performance. They never realized how tired their engine was, and how well they performed when in good shape. The only way to tell for sure is to do a compression test.

 

There are a few things you can do to improve performance, like using a later head from a 1957 - 59 car to increase compression, installing a larger carb and exhaust pipe, that do not show and do not affect smoothness or driveability.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 9 months later...
On 6/18/2019 at 5:50 PM, keithb7 said:

Hi folks. It turns out I have a Mopar D54-xxxxx SN engine here. 25” long block. Made in Canada. 4 ½” stroke. Have not had the head off yet but I’d wager its got a 3 ⅜” bore. Netting 228 ci. Likely came from a 1955 Dodge Royal or similar Canadian car. 

 

Most replacement engine parts listings are for American built Mopar engines. I am having trouble locating engine parts lists for my 228. 

 

Internet research tells me Chryco only offered the 25” block. They changed bore and stroke to accomodate power needs for each application. They got the same block down to a 201 ci, and as large as a 265 ci.  I suspect distributor, cap, rotor, points, condenser, stuff may be the same accross the Canadian line up from around 52 to 55 in the 6 cylinder flat head offerings. 

 

Can anyone help with confirming this or straightening me out on this?  For example Bernbaum lists tons of parts for mass produced American Mopar engines. I don’t see parts listed for the Canadian 228 engine. Thanks. 

 

Keith

HI keith -   I don't have a 1955 Dodge Shop Manual or Engineering Manual handy but that engine was used 1st in the 1930s in Desoto and Chrysler,  then came out for the 2nd round in 1949.  I have a 1949 Plymouth Business Coupe that my Great Aunt bought brand new from Wellington Motors in Guelph Ontario Canada. It had a 228 in it.  It was also available in Dodge cars and Dodge /Fargo pickups up to 1955 or 1956.   

 

I will attach you a sheet of the Dodge / Fargo truck manual to should you the bore and stroke etc.

 

But to your question,    the 25 1/2" engines  that are 218 (not the 217 ci 23 1/2" block but the Canadian 25 1/2" engine) 238ci,  250 (some call 251),  and 265 engines

all will have interchangeable  distributor, cap, rotor, points, condensers...   plus many other thing like water pumps.  With the notation that your right in the time frame where

there were internal bypass heads.   Those would have a little bump on the front of the block and head.

 

Happy to help, but I am rarely on this site.   You can get me at fargopickupking@yahoo.com 

 

Tim Kingsbury

 

91432779_646831099489097_2563166835063128064_n.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks very much @fargopickupking . I appreciate the help. 
 

Since I posted this question I’ve done more research again.. I found a Canadian Mopar service book that covers 1953/54. Looking up specs for D54 engines I had reason to believe my Canadian engine is a 1954 Dodge Regent or similar car engine. 228 cu.  Its defintely 25 ¼” long.  Still no head off yet. But someday I will, and can then confirm bore. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

well towards the back of the head. In pretty much the dead center there is a brass plug.   You can remove that,  put in a straightened coat hanger or welding rod of something, and then us a bar and socket to turn the engine over. Measure the stroke from top dead center to bottom dead center..   4 1/4"  sort of nails it.  You  can also 

check a few thing..  On the oil filler side, of course there is a serial number stamped on the top front corner. A picture of that and I can tell you if its a factory stamp or

was added later when a block was replaced.  then down by the plan close to the oil filler you will see a date code cast into the block.  then at the same level but back

further towards the back of the engine will be a part number.  Not near as important but up higher and usually in front of the oil filler there will be a clock and a shift code in there which will tell us what time of the day was when the block was casted.

 

If I had that it would be easier for me to tell you what you have.    Ther date codes are not in anything close to a standard format.  They were for internal use really.   Here is a 1950 Desoto block which I just happen to have pictures of.  What was interesting about it, was if it was a USA car with the Canadian 25 1/2" engine it would be a 238 ci motor, but this one was  sold in Canada with a Canadian engine and it is a 250 ci motor.  It was a car that had since new been in one family but many had told them the engine was guaranteed a 238.  When I pulled the engine pulled the pan and head, it was standard bore, standard bearings  and 1 under rod bearings.  Add to it the factory stamp (notice they are all in a perfect line)  which all pointed to this was the original engine and never been apart.   It was showing 78,003  miles on the odometer and I am sure that was all original.

 

in the glove box was the maintenance records for the car since brand new, and even had date, number of gallons (then later litres) of gas and what the price was

for every gallon of fuel ever put into it.

 

20171121_123922.jpg

20171121_123945.jpg

20171121_123912.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...