DShoes

US Radiator: which for '65 base model Rivieria?

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Posted (edited)
14 minutes ago, KongaMan said:

The theory is correct; the analysis and conclusion possibly less so.

 

Consider a radiator with a 2" tank.  You can install 4 rows of tubes, each 3/8" wide with 1/8" between them, or one tube that's 1-7/8" wide.  Assuming that all tubes are 1/8" tall, which configuration has more surface area?

 

Next, consider flow.  Which has greater flow: 4 3/8" x 1/8" tubes or a single 1-7/8"x1/8" tube?

 

Cooling capacity is a function of several factors (surface area, flow rate, fin spacing, tube density, etc.), but newer materials and manufacturing techniques force us to reconsider conventional wisdom.

 

Good points, gentlemen. The folks that recored my radiator also offered a "race" or premium" version (for a more premium addtn'l cost of course) which included dimples inside the tubes. Reason being (supposedly) is turbination. The more turbulence in the coolant, the more "cold" coolant comes into contact with the tube wall thereby increasing heat transfer. Goes to your guys flow rate and surface area points. How much increased heat transfer you might ask? "Around 15%" was what I was told. I passed on the offer since it felt like it was more from the Marketing Dept than the R&D Dept. but I tip my hat to them for the idea!

Edited by DShoes (see edit history)

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15% sounds a bit excessive.  If it's all about surface area, there's no requirement that a tube need be straight; a wavy tube would increase both the effective length and surface area.  Similarly, if the surface of the tube were covered with ridges, that would also increase surface area.  Of course, all of this comes with compromise (e.g. you can't rod out a curved tube ;); a curved tube doesn't flow as well).  At some point, you bump up against the law of diminishing returns.

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On 8/13/2019 at 3:48 AM, KongaMan said:

More rows doesn't necessarily mean better cooling.  In fact, one wide row is likely better than four small rows.

Capacity always equals more cooling. Sure there are small 4 row and big 2 row cores, but in general, more is better, also for surface area to dissipate the heat.  I know, I've put in over 100 radiators in all types of hot rods, customs and race cars and spec my own custom rods when necessary.

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16 minutes ago, DualQuadDave said:

Capacity always equals more cooling. Sure there are small 4 row and big 2 row cores, but in general, more is better, also for surface area to dissipate the heat.

Do the math.

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32 minutes ago, KongaMan said:

Do the math.

You do the math. More liquid capacity is better.  More surface area is better.  Bigger is better. Why is this so hard????

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18 minutes ago, DualQuadDave said:

You do the math. More liquid capacity is better.  More surface area is better.  Bigger is better. Why is this so hard????

I gave a specific example.  Crunch those numbers and tell me what you see.  Hint: the space between rows is neither surface area nor liquid capacity.

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Posted (edited)

Unless the coolant can come into contact with the cooling fins, you might as well just recirculate the water without trying to cool it.  Like run it through a brass tube that's  1-7/8" thick. And do it quickly.

Edited by RivNut (see edit history)

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26 minutes ago, RivNut said:

Unless the coolant can come into contact with the cooling fins, you might as well just recirculate the water without trying to cool it.  Like run it through a brass tube that's  1-7/8" thick. And do it quickly.

Which would also argue in favor of fewer larger tubes.  A straight surface area calculation includes the leading and trailing sides of the tubes; areas which have no contact with the fins.  So, a single 1-7/8" x 1/8" tube has 3-3/4" of contact with each fin.  Four 3/8" x 1/8" tubes have 3" of contact with each fin.

 

It's not clear that brass is the optimal material for a tube, either -- but that's a different discussion. ;) 

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