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Dale Ragusa

Portable 6 volt jump starter

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I have a 1949 Chevy Fleetline which is all original.  I have elected to keep the original 6 volt electrical system and I keep it plugged into a 6 volt battery tender when stored in my garage.  The problem is I need a portable 6 volt battery jump starter to carry with me in the car in case of battery failure when I am out on the road.  Does anyone know if one exists?  I did try jump starting with a 12 volt one time which burned the voltage regulator. 

Thanks, Dale Ragusa              760-415-8517

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They don't exist. They did exist a few years ago, but the price was astronomical.

 

I have considered building my own out of a 6v Optima and a trickle charger, but I never get around to it. I suppose a dead battery is what it will take. I haven't had one in years.

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Hi Dale, welcome to the wonderful world of AACA forums ! Indeed I have been known to carry a spare optima along in my '20s cars. They are clean, drip proof, and can be plugged-in to substitute for the optimas already on-line. Or, use my high quality jumper cables. It is a good idea to charge optimas with a charger having an AGM setting. 

 

AACA, and your fellow forum friends, have a  particular fondness for original ancient iron. Here is one of mine. Original down to the paint (fenders and aprons were repainted), and interior. The wheels are an extra set to preserve the strong originals. The ones I put in storage are in original paint and pinstriping, paint is becoming just a little bit delicate. To save them I had this spare set re-spoked. Here you see the relic carrying "off-shore" gear. This was taken in Santa Barbara about 1/2 way through a 2700 mile drive. There was a spare optima on board. Never needed it. Oh : I have been asked about the tow rope you see. Implications being that I might need rescue. "Naw, I am just a thoughtful period motorist. I want to be prepared to tow someone else in need !"  😋

 

O.K. Now that I have introduced you to this thing, could you please tell us more about your original  '49 Chevy ? Can you post pictures ?

 

                                                         Glad you joined us !   -   Carl 

 

 

E31DB919-981A-4722-A510-A4272925C02D.jpeg

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Since I have driven a few 6 volt cars as daily drivers, good weather drivers, and just for fun and have never had any problems or resorted to battery tenders and the like let me ask a couple of questions.

 

First -  are both battery cables (including ground here) at least 0 gauge and preferably 00? Any welding shop can make up a set - it is not that expensive. I had a 51 Plymouth that sat out in the barn all winter on a dirt floor. No battery tender and I often went out in January or February when the roads were clear and it started right up - even with the air temperature around 0 degrees. I never had a battery "failure" when out on the road. Something appears to be amiss either in your cables (connections must be clean - including both end of the ground connection and any auxiliary ground straps). Cars I drove year round with 6 volt batteries in upstate NY included a Model "A" Ford, 49 Dodge, 50 Chevrolet truck, the aforementioned Plymouth and probably a couple in high school I can't remember (the 60's were like that)...

 

My guess would be cables and/or connections

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You will not find one on any shelf. I would recommend investing in making the car as reliable as they were when they were new. People did not ride around with extra batteries back in the day. You can keep it original 6v and be just as reliable as any 12v system. You can keep the generator system and have it be just as reliable as any alternator. I don't care what any of todays mechanics say.

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2 hours ago, Tinindian said:

That is why cranks were supplied, in case of a low battery.

You cannot crank the larger stuff - cranks were more for timing ignition and turning engine over during periods of storage

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There is no substitute for a good battery. Get one and replace it every 3 years as part of regular service. Running a car on an old used battery is hard on the entire electrical system including the generator and starter. 

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Posted (edited)

Hmmm... Maybe it does still exist. I thought I heard it was discontinued, but I just found a company in France(?) still listing it. Ceteor SOS 6V-850CA, 857 Euros (about $960 USD, and then you would have astronomical shipping costs, unless you happen to live in Europe).

 

http://www.batteriediscount.com/booster/1307-batterie-6v-850a-pour-booster.html

 

 

Edited by Bloo (see edit history)

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and even though many dont recommend it- you can buy an 8 volt battery for quicker starts.............

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3 hours ago, John_Mereness said:

You cannot crank the larger stuff - cranks were more for timing ignition and turning engine over during periods of storage

You can, well I can hand crank a PA derivative engine in a Fire apparatue. V12.  At any rate the OP was about a '49 Chevrolet and their cranks were designed to start the engine, even in the winter on the prairies.

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Posted (edited)
17 hours ago, Tinindian said:

You can, well I can hand crank a PA derivative engine in a Fire apparatue. V12.  At any rate the OP was about a '49 Chevrolet and their cranks were designed to start the engine, even in the winter on the prairies.

And you have personally hand cranked that Pierce Arrow V-12 to  successfully start it ? 

 

And I have hand cranked the RR PI at 600 Cubic Inches / 8 litres (or whatever it is) and turns just fine, but I would never dream of ever starting it with the handcrank.

 

Sidenote: I doubt a 49 Chevrolet would have a hand crank (sort of a pre-war thing excepting European cars).

 

Addl.  Sidenote:  I am not trying to be rude, though my point is if someone takes advice and then gets themselves hurt it is not really a good thing. 

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)

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10 minutes ago, John_Mereness said:

And, I have hand cranked the RR PI at 600 Cubic Inches / 8 litres (or whatever it is) and turns just fine, but I would never dream of starting it with the handcrank.

 

 

Three of use used to take turns hand cranking Phantom II 201RY to bring the oil pressure up on Spring startup. That's work! John Utz would supervise, Roy Bertch would tap the oil pressure gauge with his fingertip, and three of us would sweat. That was all an effort to minimize use of the starter.

 

If I should run into a situation where I am away from home and the car battery fails, the only battery I am going to worry about is my cell phone battery for AAA to flatbed it home.

Bernie

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3 minutes ago, 60FlatTop said:

 

Three of use used to take turns hand cranking Phantom II 201RY to bring the oil pressure up on Spring startup. That's work! John Utz would supervise, Roy Bertch would tap the oil pressure gauge with his fingertip, and three of us would sweat. That was all an effort to minimize use of the starter.

 

If I should run into a situation where I am away from home and the car battery fails, the only battery I am going to worry about is my cell phone battery for AAA to flatbed it home.

Bernie

I have popped the clutch a few times - by the way, I saw a fellow run to help push start a 29 Packard and he went for the side-mount tire and then lost his footing fell under car for a second and literally I do not know how he avoided injury but rolled just enough to have the rear wheel brush him - it was a pretty horrific thing to see for a few seconds. 

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That's a pretty good story. Sometimes I get an image of the person in stories like that and it is amazingly close to the real person.

 

My biggest fear in a no start situation would be the volunteer help. They mean well. My Daughter started driving her 1965 Electra in High School. I had no fear of her car failing to start, but others.... not so sure. So I told her that her car was different from all others and it could not be hooked up to jumper cables. I bought a booster pack and put it in the trunk, told her never to use her car to jump with and let her friends use the booster if they had trouble. I think it was used on two friends cars. Best $90 I ever spent and she got to be a hero.

Bernie

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Quote

 

Best 6 volt battery I have found for daily reliable going to work through the years is the 6 volt battery used in the older trucks they carried 4 of them to make 12 volts  some trucks used this setup in to the 90.s .

I had to make  the battery tray larger to hold the battery it still go's through the original  opening and is 9 1/2 tall 12 1/2 long and 7 inches wide with 960 cca to 1000 cca and they last  about 10 years

DSCN1454.JPG

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Posted (edited)

I also use the same battery as above in most of my six volt cars and trucks... a group #4 six volt...long lasting and very powerful.

I have to make up new hold downs.

My 4 tonner group4 battery (4).JPG

Edited by c49er (see edit history)

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