arnulfo de l.a.

How much longer for the internal combustion engine?

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I may be a pessimist, but I think climate change is coming faster and going to be worse than we thought, so yes, I think some serious change is coming.  Don't know if that's three years down the road or twenty.  Have though about this a lot recently.  Should I sell my old cars now before they're worthless or just bite the bullet when it happens?  Its such a huge hobby and industry the impact will be huge but there's definitely change a comin'.  Who's going to cut down the last tree on Easter island?

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We can help limit pollution, and the US does more than many to do that.  But trying to prevent climate change isn't going to happen. (two very loosely connected things) of course anything can be strewed to look connected with enough interpretation.   As I said before for all the conservative efforts we take,  Mother nature shoves us back to where we were or much further back with one quick blow via a forest Fire , volcano or something else.  When we are careful of what we burn and restrict all emissions,  She comes in and smokes everything for sometimes hundreds of square miles,  from the entire car to the garage it's in and the garbage in the garbage can at the curb.  

Forest management is crucial and too many organizations can't see past the individual tree for the overall picture of forest health. 

I would worry more about overpopulation than climate change. 

Edited by auburnseeker (see edit history)

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I read somewhere that more methane gas is produced in California by cow farts than automobiles.  Whadda you do about that? 🤔

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Bio-fuels plantations could reduce the damage from so called "fossil fuels", as soon as the rain forests get burned off so plowing can start.

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It is a little tough on the locals.

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They don't understand we need to keep the lights on.

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6 hours ago, RivNut said:

I read somewhere that more methane gas is produced in California by cow farts than automobiles.  Whadda you do about that? 🤔

There is a serious concern about methane gas trapped below the frost line at the poles.  Now that they are melting, this gas will be released.  Methane contributes 10x what co2 does to greenhouse effect.  One study I read calculated that due to this methane release was that it could be critical mass by 2030.

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On 6/14/2019 at 7:08 AM, RivNut said:

I read somewhere that more methane gas is produced in California by cow farts than automobiles.  Whadda you do about that?

 

Actually, contrary to popular believe, over 90% of a cow's release of methane is caused by their burps, not their farts. Since humans can somewhat relate to our release of internal gases, as both actions in humans (at least for me) is highly dependent on what we eat, apparently there has been research... found this on line...

 

"Interestingly, if a cow chows down on easily digestible food such as corn, it produces about a third as much methane as a cow that grazes on prairie grasses. This means that cows in high-density livestock operations such as feedlots or dairies actually produce less methane than grass-fed beef."

 

But for some ranchers, corn fed is prohibitively expensive, so without resorting to a severe reduction in red meat consumption,  maybe things can be done to at least capture 10%, of a cow's methane similar to what happened to the car's emissions of the 70's...

 

 

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but I have a sneakin' suspicion that this discussion is drifting a little off forum topic...

 

Later,

 

Mike Swick

Edmonton, AB

---

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My brother-in-law & my two sons have cars that consistently get BETTER than 54 MPG.  One is a fairly new, 2015, & my sons drive older cars that can achieve that now.

 

 

Tom T.

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Ever wondered why Norway has such a high percentage of electric cars:

·         High stamp duty on internal combustion cars.

·         Electric cars are exempts from stamp duty and other taxes.

·         Exemption of roads tolls,  Free ferry travel,  Free recharging sites, Free public parking & access to bus lanes.

 H

eavy government policy driving out internal combustion powered cars.

Cheers

Tom K

 

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Norway is also in a very lucky situation: huge budget surplus (about 4.5% of their GDP) thus they can afford to direct tax cuts towards whatever objective they have.

In their case, their electricity coming over 99% from hydropower, the switch to electric powered cars makes a lot of sense. In fact the Nissan Leaf is a best seller.

If electricity is made burning fossil fuels, the balance is not so clear, to the point that according to some research that I've seen, made at the KTH University in Stockholm, considering all the energy involved in building a car, and given an average life of 150.000 km, if ALL cars in the world switched to electrical power, the CO2 global output would be reduced by a meager 2%. In Italy only about 40% comes fron renewables.

As far as pollution goes instead, this would be a very different story. In Italy  we have a preponderance of diesel cars (about 55%) that have proved time and again to be a major source of toxic pollutants (in particular, the nanoparticles). I live in a highly polluted area (northern Italian flatland, graph here), and the switch to less polluting means of transportation would impact our lives significantly.

I think that the ICE still has decades of life ahead in conjunction with electric motors in hybrid cars. I drive daily a 2004 Prius (I was an early adopter) and a diesel Subaru Legacy. I'd buy an hybrid over and over again whereas I would never buy a diesel again.

 

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On June 16, 2019 at 4:43 PM, TKRIV said:

Ever wondered why Norway has such a high percentage of electric cars:

·         High stamp duty on internal combustion cars.

·         Electric cars are exempts from stamp duty and other taxes.

 

·         Exemption of roads tolls,  Free ferry travel,  Free recharging sites, Free public parking & access to bus lanes.

 

 

 H

eavy government policy driving out internal combustion powered cars.

 

Cheers

Tom K

That car would take all the joy out of driving, not because its electric but because there absolutely no attempt to give a bit of style!

 

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Edited by arnulfo de l.a.
Forgot a word (see edit history)

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