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Glove Box "Shock Absorber"


Copper81
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Well, I have tried and tried ... but failed to find a particular posting. I know I saw a post about the small "shock absorber" that helps the glove box open slowly. My glove box shock is worn out and I remember seeing a posting on how to fix them. I took the shock out and have a part number and even a manufacturer (that apparently is within 40 miles of me ... if they still exist that is). I can't seem to find any source for replacing the shock so I was considering trying to fix it but can't find the posting. Can anyone help me out here ... either point me to the post or let me know where I can get a new part. Thanks!

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I found this: <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> <span style="font-weight: bold">I hunted around and couldn't find any source for new parts so I decided to repair mine. I drilled a small hole where it wouldn't interfere with the valving action or the normal plunger travel. The hole was just large enough to insert a syringe filled with synthetic power steering fluid with seal swell. I then soldered over the hole using a 325 watt soldering gun. It works great. </span> </div></div> Let us know if it works.

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I clearly remember reading the post, can't find it frown.gif <span style="font-style: italic">BUMMER</span> frown.gif

Clearly recall something about drilling a hole, injecting shock or another type of light oil. Could have been Olive, excellent for cooking and Reattas cook!. confused.gif then sealing the hole.

I think that this is close but no <span style="font-style: italic">Zigar!</span>

EDIT: gosh! golly! u b fast "Vincent Vega"

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You did it Vincent! You found exactly the post that I was thinking of .... and EDBSO, at least you recall seeing it too! Now I know I wasn't nuts ... well, not too much that is. I tried the "search" and typed in all sorts of things but nothing would give me what I was looking for. Thanks for finding that for me. Now I just need to "give it a go" and hope for the best! I'll let ya'll know how it works out. Thanks again! This forum is GREAT!!

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Figured I'd give everyone my results of rebuilding this "glove box shock absorber". Using the instructions that Vincent found and given that there were no guildleines on where to drill the hole to use for refuilling the shock, I drilled a hole about 5/8" from the flat end of the shock (the end away from the plunger). Looking back on it now, I would recommend putting the hole about 1/4" from the flat end. I drilled the hole with the plunger pulled all the way out, didn't want to damage anything on the inside of the shock. I used a small syringe and power steering fluid to refill the shock through the hole. Here comes the slightly tricky part. You can't completely fill the shock. If you do, the plunger cannot move in and out freely. This is based on my experience from having checked this out during the rebuild. My shock was empty and I used maybe 4 to 5 ml (milliliters) of power steering fluid to get the plunger to operate correctly. You can place your finger over the hole and pull the plunger back and forth to check for proper operation. Add or delete fluid as necessary. Being concerned that anything would get into the hole when I went to seal it, I placed a small piece of tin foil over it and then epoxyed the foil in place covering it very well. If the epoxy doesn't seem to hold well, I am goig to go back and solder it as the instructions that Vincent found had suggested. This is an easy fix and doesn't take much time. The only thing remaining is to see how well the shock holds the new fluid. I hope that the inner seals aren't worn too bad and let it all leak out again. I'll be checking this before I reinstall the shock. Anyway, I hope this helps any of you with this same type problem. Let me know if you have any questions ... glad to try to help.

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Vincent, I noticed that there was the mention of using a seal sweller mixed with the power steering fluid. But I have no idea what the seal sweller is or where I could buy such a thing. So I went ahead and only used power steering fluid. I am hoping that the seals are not completely shot and that they will hold. So far I haven't seen any evidence of leaking but intend to keep an eye on it. If anyone knows about this seal sweller, I'd like to hear more.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Thought I would update everyone on my experiment to restore the glove box piston (as detailed here). Well, sorry to say that even though it worked for a while, it has gone back to it's "warp speed" drop down action!! Oddly enough, it has not leaked out any fluid I put into it though. Nevertheless, it is not working as it should be ... {sigh}. I sure wish I knew where we all could get new pistons to replace these. I have run across a place in Canada (I think it was Canada) that rebuilds these type pistons. I don't know how much that would cost but that may be the only solution left that I know of to fix this. Any other thoughts from you extremely knowledgeable folks out there???

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Using an R/C shock never occured to me. Maybe I will check with a local R/C shop (just happens that they are moving and everything is 25% off!!) and see what they might have. But I would expect that the size of this piston is probably far too large to think an R/C could use this size piston. But what the heck, got nothing to loose!!!

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When I was in the stereo repair business, we had trouble with record player tone arms dropping too fast on to the record. Manufacturers used a piston inside a small cylinder or two pieces of metal that rotated against each other. It had a light coating of very heavy viscous silicon oil. It was especially designed to slow down the movement of the piston, but not migrate out of the cylinder. Eventually over years a little dab was needed to replace the slight amount that leaked out. I think this might be worth a try. Find an old reliable stereo repair shop and get a small amount of the oil (grease) and put a little inside the cylinder where the piston moves. Trial and error will determine how much is necessary.

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Karlton, as a matter of fact I stopped off at the r/c dealer today that I mentioned above in this post (the one that is moving and has everything on sale). Unfortunately they had nothing that would work. I am considering removing my refurbished piston from the glove box and try something thicker such as 30W oil rather than the power steering fluid that I used during the refurb. I'll probably tinker with that tomorrow in between turkey and football games!! If so, I'll post an update for everyone so they can learn from my experience on this. Hopefully we will get this "little bugger" working like it should rather than decapitating people's knee caps!!! Stay tuned .....

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Another update on the glove box piston refurb caper .... the piston again was letting the glove box open at full speed after my first attempt to fix and refurbish the piston (as decribed above). Based on the input within this post, I bought a bottle of sealer (power steering sealer). I opened up the pistion where I had drilled the original hole to fill the piston, emptied out any remaining power steering fluid and injected about 5 milliliters of the power steering sealer. Then I expoxied over the hole. So far the fluid appears to be holding but time will tell. I am letting it sit for a while to see what all happens. By the way, has anyone checked out for any places to rebuild these glove box drawer openers or a place to get a brand new one?? If this latest fix causes any problems, I think I'll be looking for a replacement for the piston.

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Well, final update on the process to restore the piston for the glove box. Seems that the seals for my glove box piston are just too far gone. Even with the seal sweller (power steering fluid sealant installed) it still seeps out along the piston rod. The power steering sealant fluid is thicker also than just regular power steering fluid. But with the seepage still going on, it won't be long before the glove box just slams open like it did before. It was worth a shot in trying to restore it, I learned a few things and tried to share that with everyone, and maybe it will work for some of you depending on how worn the piston seals are. Good luck ....

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Gomer, there is definitely a "shock absorber" for lack of a better term. I also have an 88 so you will have a piston on your glove box too. It is one of those pistons like you see that hold open hoods or hatchbacks but much smaller. When it fails, it will allow the glove box door to slam open (just like what you are seeing). With the box opened, look on the right side of the glove box door and you will see the piston arm attached to the door. The body of the piston is located behind the glove box liner. To get to it, you will need to remove the liner (about 10 screws if I remember correctly). It is easy to get to. If you are going to try to refurbish the piston, follow the steps that I have outlined above and if you have any questions, please don't hesitate to contact me. I'll be glad to help as much as I can. I just hope the piston you have is in better shape than mine was. It was very frustrating to go through all this and still not have it work only because the piston was too worn out. But heck, it's worth a shot!!! Go for it, you have nothing to lose ... and you might save some knee surgery .... smirk.gif ....

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