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Licespray

Why are Tuckers so expensive??

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I believe the Tucker concept came from Harry Miller who was a friend of Preston Tucker's. The fluid coupling was already in use on various cars by 1940. The next step was the torque converter which debuted on the Buick Dynaflow in 1948. But, it had already been used on the Hellcat tanks in WW2. If Miller learned about the torque converter at that time, it gave him something to think about. He came up with the idea of eliminating the clutch, transmission, driveshaft, differential and rear axle by substituting torque converters. This would call for a very slow revving, large displacement opposed six cylinder engine with a torque converter at both ends of the crankshaft, connected to the rear wheels. This was the concept of the first Tucker prototype.

This power train required the engine and drive to be mounted in the rear, and the rest of the Tucker layout proceeded from that.

 

If the Tucker resembled a Tatra in appearance it also resembled any number of fastback sedans from Detroit, including the prewar Lincoln Zephyr which was originally designed as a rear engine car.

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2 hours ago, Rusty_OToole said:

I don't believe anyone in Detroit considered Tucker a threat. It just wasn't possible for a new, small manufacturer to compete with the giants in terms of cost, dealership service, etc. At best Tucker could have been a niche product, producing cars in small numbers even compared to the independents like Hudson and Packard. If there was a campaign to sink Tucker I don't think it came from Detroit. It appears to have been politically motivated.

 

Not that they considered Tucker a threat in ‘47 or ‘48, no. Morseso, I believe the Big 3 kept abreast of the car while the Corp was solvent- it had been garnering huge attention. The ‘48 Olds or DeSoto certainly weren’t pulling in that level of attention. The people running the Big 3 should be given huge benefit of doubt as to their awareness of the industry, and any potential newcomers with the potential to disrupt the ‘boat’. After all, all the OEMs had been idly dreaming big during the war, despite being locked into their pre-war ‘clothes ‘ immediately afterwards.

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The auto companies were riding high after the war. The depression was over, they had just had 5 years of running full blast on cost plus contracts and were faced with a horde of customers clamoring for their wares, AKA the postwar seller's market. At General Motors their big worry was being broken up by the government under the anti trust laws because they were too big, too rich, too powerful and had too dominant a position in the industry. In other words it was in their interest to encourage other car companies especially the small independent ones, and not be seen as trying to put them out of business. There were quite a few new car companies started after the war like Tucker, Kaiser, Playboy, Keller, Davis and Crosley (which started prewar). Insiders knew  they could not compete with well established companies once the seller's market ended. This turned out to be true, in later years even such well established companies as Packard and DeSoto succumbed, and none of the newcomers lasted more than a few years.

 

Tucker insiders like Alex Tremulis report that Detroit was supportive of their work. When he needed steering wheels a friend at Ford sent 20 Lincoln steering wheels and never charged for them. I believe the Tucker electrical system was supplied by Delco, a GM subsidiary. Tremulis also said that styling clay was very hard to get just then but friends in the styling studios supplied him with all he needed.

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Is the car insurance cost worth it?  is a better question..

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• The mainstream OEMs were riding high in sales vs. production; a seller's market- sure. Good thing pent-up demand was so strong- the leftovers from '40-41 weren't necessarily that stirring otherwise.
• GM didn't see any anti-trust talk until 1956; their market share in '55 was 55%, it was a relatively moderate 40% in '48.
• The independents really weren't competing with the Big 3; Kaiser/Frazer to a minor degree, but the others mentioned above (Playboy, Keller, Davis, Crosley, and a host of others) weren't offering anything against a GM or Ford product. Tucker was the only full-size family sedan with excellent power & performance... plus it had a very stirring design. It definitely caught the Big 3's ear, without a doubt. What other brand was doing this in 1948?

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During the war all anti trust talk was dropped. Big companies were encouraged to cooperate in ways that in peacetime would have been illegal. All under government supervision, in the interest of maximizing war production.

 

After the war they were warned that this must come to an end. GM was warned that the government was watching them and took a dim view of their dominant position in the industry. This is one reason government agencies went out of their way to support Kaiser and Tucker. They thought new car makers were in the public interest. One reason Tucker got the Willow Run bomber plant. Only later did the SEC turn against Tucker. Why there was such a wave of bad publicity and legal action against Tucker is a mystery.

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6 hours ago, mike6024 said:

Explain how reversing the vanes gives you reverse.

 

Place two fans facing each other. Turn one on. Which way does the motor turn on the other (not electrically powered) fan? Now, tilt the blades on that unpowered fan the other way. The motor shaft will now turn the opposite rotation.

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