Isaiah

What are you using for Gasioline these days

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Ron

How about  convert the steamer to LP.?

I had a friend that modified the regulator for the LP and used it to run a old Hit And miss  Gas engine.

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Much as I thoroughly detest ethanol-containing gasoline on both political and scientific grounds, ethanol-free gasoline is not available in my area so I've been using regular E10 pump gas regularly in both my '34 and '56 Packards.  Many tens of thousands of miles accumulated on them including parades in broiling hot weather, and much as I hate the stuff, never a gasoline-related problem.

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Posted (edited)

If the gaskets and diaphragms are ethanol complaint you will be ok til the valve stems gets  loose .

If the gaskets and diaphragms are  not  one day they will go bad.

My 39 Chevy pickup  was doing ok and on the way home from a show the fuel pump gave out.

I do use stable in most every thing .

 

I have a 1942 Packard Clipper, it runs and drives but needs a lot of work. has the 282  8 in it.

It sat in a barn for 40 years and the kids broke most of the glass.

Edited by Isaiah
forgot (see edit history)

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55 minutes ago, Isaiah said:

Ron

How about  convert the steamer to LP.?

I had a friend that modified the regulator for the LP and used it to run a old Hit And miss  Gas engine.

 

 

Yes that can work for a steam burner also. A few issues with it, first a proper DOT certified propane tank for a transportation vehicle is expensive and of course it would not be correct for a historic vehicle, secondly, propane is a very cold fuel. On orders of heat i.e. carbon atoms per molecule- BTU/gallon as the chart shows. Of the commonly available fuels, in order of heat it is, Propane, Gasoline, Kerosene and Diesel being the hottest. There are hotter fuels like Bunker C that large ships use, but they are too impractical to use for a small vehicle. Thirdly, a steam car uses a lot of fuel, like 3000-5000 BTU per hour on average sized burner, 4000 BTU is near four gallons of fuel per hour, some of the large Dobles have burners over a Million BTU, of course the burner is not on all the time, but they are never going to out-efficient a Prius with those numbers. Back to the thirdly, Propane tanks have a limitation which is a set vaporization rate at ambient temperature or they start making ice on their exterior, a 20 pound cylinder is about 100kBTU per hour at 72 degrees F, not enough without multiple tanks or a very large tank. Some folks get the idea to heat the propane tank..... and that's what keeps YouTube in business. :)

 

-Ron

 

image.jpeg.d5a43246f55187cdd4460a4757b1e036.jpeg

 

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14 hours ago, Locomobile said:

I heard of another way to remove it is with water, pour water in the fuel and let it sit, the alcohol will mix with the water the gasoline won't. Then pour off the water with alcohol mixed in, it leaves pure gasoline.

 

-Ron

That's fine that you have removed the ethanol, but remember that the ethanol was used to boost the octane in the fuel. What are you going to use to boost the octane? All the octane boost additives in the parts store use alcohol as the primary source.

   

 In my town of 40,000 people there is one gas station that sells ethanol free fuel, however it cost way more than 92 premium.

Ethanol free fuel, paint thinner, kerosene and diesel fuel are examples of fuels that are cheaper to make than ethanol fuels that cost MORE. 

 

VP racing fuel is great, and they make a variety of different blends including ethanol, however it is ILLEGAL to use leaded fuel in a motor vehicle on a  public road or highway!

 

The only entity or persons that can use leaded fuel is in the aviation industry for airplanes with  piston engines. And for them the lead content has been cut way down from the past. You can only get 100LL gone is the fuel I used to use when I was a flight engineer 145/115!  

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Posted (edited)
14 hours ago, c49er said:

Global warming is a huge issue you know.

 

That has been changed to Climate Change. No one will admit they ever said Global Warming.

 

The corn is planted, tended, and harvested with diesel equipment. I have seen it delivered to a half operational ethanol plant by diesel trains.

It is kind of like the solar panels brought in from China and South Korean with bunker C fuel oil and transported by diesel trucks.

 

There is one politically correct planetary set of conditions that must be achieved and stabilized for all the future. Once those conditions are met nothing can change again.

 

This planet has undergone constant change for billions of years (or maybe 4,000) but that has to stop now. And remain constant.

 

Latest energy figures: https://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/pdf/flow/total_energy.pdf

Edited by 60FlatTop (see edit history)
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One thing you can do is take a container . I like the clear glass bottles that the organic drinks come in .

put in  a inch or so of water then 2-3 inches of

your gas.then put the cap on and shake it up and let it settle 

Then you will see 3 rings water on the bottom the ethanol and last the gas on the top!!

Using  the water method is messy and I dont know what you do with the water and ethanol when you have it separated out,

If you have a politician living nearby you could water his lawn and garden with it.

LOOK FOR MARINE GAS.

I have a station that has it and about 30 cents a gal more that the low grade  gas.

 

 

 

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I've been using non-ethanol gas in my antiques, Harley's and lawn mowers for years.   I live about 7 miles north of Dade City, Florida and there are 3 (use to be 4) stations selling the good go juice within 10 miles.🤩  One of the stations also sells 110 octane (leaded🤫) racing gas!😍  I mix a little of the high octane gas with the regular non-ethanol for the Harley's.  They surely appreciate it too.........:wub:

 

Capt. Harley😉

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Two ears ago I took a hit and miss gas engine to a show it was hot outside and the engine ran about a half hr and quit, the intake  valve was stuck , so I freed it up and put some oil on the valve stem and away it went again then about a 1/2 the intake was stuck again I went and talked to one of the other guys that had engines there and told him my problem and he said it is the gas!!

I  took it home and drained the gas out and the next year  I put the Marine gas in and went to the show  and the engine never quit on me.!

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On 5/27/2019 at 12:41 PM, Isaiah said:

 

I put stable and some Marvel Mystery oil in also.

Gives upper cylinder lubrication . you can do that to the new cars.

You cannot do that on any 1975 and newer car. Cars with catalytic converters get clogged up when you add lubricants to the fuel. The newer cars cannot even take the zink and phosphates that older motor oil contained as pressure lubricant additives. That's why these days you need to add zink and phosphates to motor oil when doing oil changes on antique vehicles  

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Posted (edited)

According to Marvel Mystery Oil's website (and calls I've made to their company), yes, you can safely use Marvel Mystery Oil in modern cars with catalytic converters.  

 

I have used MMO in the gas in my last two cat- equipped cars (Fords) with no ill effects. And, both vehicles always passed the NYS inspection emissions test every year.  And, it cleared up the fuel injectors making my 88 Econoline and 98 Windstar run noticeably better, after I bought them used with 40k+ miles on each. 

 

There's not enough oil in Marvel Mystery Oil to clog anything. It's mostly mineral spirits, with some light-weight oil,  which all burns very cleanly. 

 

BTW, there's no "Mystery" to MMO. You can download the MSDS and see exactly what is in it.

 

Paul

Edited by PFitz (see edit history)

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Here is a couple pictures of my carb off my 1930 Chrysler.

I stopped running it in  the 1990's and drained the gas tank and card bowl  and ran the electric pump dry.

I started it This Saturday and yesterday it wouldn’t start!!

The carb is cast iron and brass.

DSCN5693.JPG

DSCN5694.JPG

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Posted (edited)

That reminds me of  the older Bill Hirsch yellow gas tank sealer - before the days of the alcohol resistant type. Using it with ethanol gas partially dissolves it into lumpy goo that coats and gums up fuel system parts. I've had to clean out the fuel system in my Austin because it looked like that from using early version of gas tank sealer that I put in back in the late 1970's. It became coated with yellow goo after I left it sitting with E-10 gasoline. .  

 

Switched to using the white alcohol resistant sealer and  I've never had a problem. 

 

Paul 

Edited by PFitz (see edit history)

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When I got the truck  I got it running and used a boat tank for several years til I got the gook out of the tank,

Then  I seen the ends of the tank were soldered in and i un soldered it and took it to the sand blaster , he blasted it all over and I brought it home and brazed

the holes up and took it back to the blast and paint  shop and had him coat the inside and it was good .

I have been wondering  how the inside of the tank is?

I have a friend that has one of those little cameras that you can put in small places ,

Ill see if I can get  hem come and look inside. 

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Yep, we are fortunate that in Florida a number of stations have non-ethanol gas for us to use. WAWA, SPEADWAY and others all have non-ethanol and some have octane choices too.

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I got gas in my every day truck yesterday and was $2.87 a gal and 3.38 for the no ethanol .

I think it is worth the extra .50 cents a gal .

Each grade of gas at the pump  has different ingredients in them .

There is a uitube on that if I can find it again.

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Posted (edited)

Is there a way that a back yard mechanic  could age today’s gas to see what it would be in 5 yrs 10 yrs etc

Something that you would  to expect if a vehicle was put in storage with   today’s gas in it.

I may put some in a glass bottle and see, a glass bottle s one for regular 87  and one  for no ethanol gas.

Edited by Isaiah (see edit history)

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