Salvo

Packard 12 limo

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Does anyone know if there is any history on a Packard 12 limo, with engine number 1235-2107, delivered from Packard Chicago,.....(Chicago 8439 stamped on the ID plate)?

 

Further, where is the best site to find info on the Packard 12 limo?

 

Salvo

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Posted (edited)

First, you need to post some photos....they made Packard V-12 Limos from 1932 to 1939.......and they built a bunch of them, YES a BUNCH of them. Year, series, upholstery photos front and rear, accessories and modifications are all clues to the cars past. There are experts who will do an extensive history on the car.........post in the CCCA, Packard Club, ect. Shouldn't be too difficult to get history back to the 50's or 60's, earlier than that can be difficult. 

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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Posted (edited)

1235-2107 is not an engine number, engine numbers for the 1939 Twelve would run from 905501 to 906841.  1235-2107 is a vehicle number and should correspond to the number stamped in the space titled "vehicle number" on the patent plate on the cowl.  That vehicle number would identify the 107th 1939 Twelve limousine.  There are no known surviving factory records of the number of 1939 Twelve limousines built but based on vehicle numbers of survivors, we know that at least 113 were built and the survivor rate is relatively high.

Edited by Owen_Dyneto (see edit history)

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contact the roster keeper for this model at the Packard Club ( and join!)    head over to packardinfo.com, pretty active site, and you'll be asked for vehicle info too.  In both places you can see who else has registered a similar vehicle.  As stated, for a low production car the survival rate is pretty high and the club support is good

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Thank you all for your prompt replies. I am looking at possibly buying this car; it looks stunning, and has been well looked after, and almost fully restored. I thought being from Chicago in 1939, it might have a colourful history …….. either with good guys or the bad guys.

Yes, it is a 1939 model. I have attached photographs below. If I am lucky enough to get it, I will post details. Thanks again.

Regards,

Salvo

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There's a thread on PackardInfo regarding this Twelve when it went to auction recently,  this one.

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My error in previous post of motor numbers for 1939 Twelves.  The range is from B602001 thru B602497.

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If you look at the thread on this car in Packard.info you will learn a lot more about it. It was offered for sale (and apparently sold) at the Gosford Classic Car Museum closure auction recently. The car has basically no early history. It was imported to Australia about 25 years ago by a well-known Packard Club member who knows about its condition and subsequent history. It was not restored since arriving in Australia but had some mechanical work done by a subsequent owner, mainly on the engine. The current condition of the engine is unknown. It now is in need of a repaint and perhaps other mechanical work. It has a reproduction data plate with what are quite possibly correct numbers. One of the stickers on the windshield is from a Packard workshop in Santa Ana, California although the shop's owner (Robert Escalante) has no recollection of it. It was apparently located somewhere like Texas when it was purchased and brought to Australia. Most recently, It sat for at least ten years in a warehouse full of cars belonging to a guy called Andrew Lidden. He died a few years ago and the Museum purchased the car from his estate. So it was sitting in the Museum for several more years. There is at least one more of this 1708 model in Australia currently. Another one was sold at auction by Mecum in the US late last year. The survival rate for this model (as others say) is quite high.

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Posted (edited)

Don't let old gangster movies kid you. 99 chances out of 100 the original owner was a business man or a dowager of independent means. With luck, it may be a name you recognize like Pillsbury  or  Gillette. The chance of it belonging to some movie star, gangster, or celebrity is almost nil.

Edited by Rusty_OToole (see edit history)
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