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Local car show turn-off


J.H.Boland
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Consider this: To disc jockeys or whatever you call yourselves these days and event planners.

We all like old cars and that's why we collect and sometimes show them. So for the people that come to a event and play the music why not play the appropriate music for the years of the cars presented on the show field. It's funny that the people who owned a 40 Chevy or Ford never played Glenn Miller to the volume of the 10's because really good music doesn't need to be played that loud to be appreciated.

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I go to a car show every Tue. night. 50's music, not too loud. 50 to 60 cars just show up, mixed years, some newer some older. But driving in with a 32 Packard and everyone looks. They past right by those pony cars etc. and take a photo of mine. If we don't get our cars out no one will realize they exist and the sport will die. Young people need to see them before they can appreciate them, so go show yours and turn your hearing aid down, it could provide a great memory for some little kid, that may want to buy your car one day.  

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22 hours ago, TerryB said:

My car show this week featured a lot of HPOF and driver quality cars.  Not a big showing in the prewar class.  Music was provided by Simon and Garfunkel on CD playing their greatest hits.  Indoor show so weather was a non issue and my manually pushed wheel chair did not have to deal with divots in the grass on lack of decent handicap parking spaces.  Like I said, enjoy them while you can!

 

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Awesome tow truck!

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I generally love 50's rock music, but whenever I'm at a car show I'm reminded that there is a lot of 50's music that I don't like, too. I don't like sappy songs like Teen Angel or a lot of the doo-wop stuff. Those car shows will play '60's pop music too (and thankfully stay mostly away from the weird psychedelic stuff) but wouldn't it be great if they could play '40's big band era swing or maybe popular music from the 1930's for all the people who have unmodified or non-hot rod Fords from that era? Or Packards? A little '50's and 60's music goes a loooong way.

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I don't know where you live, James, but you might try the La Jolla Concours d'Elegance. I went in 2014, and they had a live band playing 40s/50s/60s jazz. My friend David Baird was showing his Auburn and I got to attend with a participant lanyard and everything. A very first class affair which I would highly recommend. I'll see if I can find an image from back then.

 

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  Like they say for Carling Black Label: "People Like It!"              

  Carling ads:

 

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Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)
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The first time I went to the local High School show was several years ago. My son was still in Middle School and I had heard it was a reasonably decent show for a smaller High School. 

 We went not knowing what to expect. There were 30 or 40 cars with about 6 having the most incredibly loud car sound systems imaginable.  We did not stay long.

 

Eventually that became my sons High School and I thought I should gather up some ear plugs and show support for my sons school. What a pleasant surprise; no extremely loud car systems playing " teenager" oriented rap, just a pleasant volume 60's sound  over the P.A.  And at least a couple of hundred local cars. Each year since it has been better than the last.

 I guess somehow someone mentioned to the Auto Shop teacher that is the main organizer that jet engine volume level car systems are a problem, along with "music" that should never ever be heard by anyone over the age of 18.  Or really anyone . 

If you have not heard "modern " rap don't bother. It's beyond describing and I am someone who has listened to everything from 1930's Jazz and Blues to 9 inch Nails, Soundgarden and Tool.

 

Photo's from a couple of Saturday's ago edition, not bad for a local show.

 

Greg in Canada

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Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)
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A few years ago, I was told that a famous NASCAR team owner was having an Open House at one of his office complexes.  His personal car collection was on display and numbered in the dozens.  When I arrived, I was greeted by two humongous speakers and a mobile broadcasting van from one of the local rock stations.  I couldn't wait to get out of there.  We've had the same loud music at Open Houses at work.  No music would be better than loud music of any type.  It has become a way of life at most public events.

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At the McPherson College car show, the only music we have is the college jazz band, and the high school jazz band. Each plays a set lasting about 45 minutes. Otherwise the PA system is used for the occasional announcement. Without any other music throughout the day, the jazz bands really stand out, and everyone loves it. They are young talent, playing jazz, it is not all day, and the sound system is adequate enough that it doesn't have to be blasted. 

 

It's just one of the things that make our show different.

I've had some people tell me they come back each year because we don't blast music all day. 

Edited by Chris Paulsen (see edit history)
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Before I complain about the music, I must learn to tolerate the guy who fires up his straight pipe exhausted car

every 2O minutes just to announce he's still there.  This in exchange for the right to hear a Model A or T idle when

 the music is off.   Being considerate of others is not on everybody's short list of things to do at shows.

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When I take my '21 Chevy to shows,I'll occasionally fire it up and let it idle. You can almost count the strokes and watching the open rockers and push rods in motion is mesmerizing . That's music to my ears ! I once had a guy with a long ponytail and the smell of "grass" on his clothes remark " Whoa dude ! The original Chevy small block "!.

Edited by J.H.Boland (see edit history)
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I attend mostly cruise nights now here on long island , or will start to again if the rain ever ceases. I do support the marque car club chapter annual show or try to if I can, but the trend over the past number of years is for local car clubs, be they regions of national clubs or not , as well as service groups that support worthy causes , chambers of commerce etc. all now want to charge $15 , usually $20 per car to attend the car show they host to add $ to their treasury. Perhaps some of that fee goes to pay for a small aluminum plaque printed to note the event ( remember when these used to be all brass?) but if it weren't for the people who own the cars attending they would not have a show. If one attends say at least 3 car meets/shows a month for several months you can spend several hundred dollars to get that printed alloy plaque. Add to that the cost of gasoline, is it all worth it to have to pay $ for people to see your car?  I am not trying to be cheap, but for several years have not bothered to go to car shows, would rather just get in my car and drive it around, and have a good time. I have no interest in awards of any kind so always put a "do not judge" sign on my windshield. Is there anyone else reading this that is done paying people to look at their car? Or am I just getting to be a old fogey ? ( those of you that know me may think you were always an old fogey , so what else is new)

Edited by Walt G
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I can see (to some degree) charging visitors to attend a car show.  I can't see charging participants.  I can look at my cars all day for free.  Why would I want to pay so you can see them?  What's the value proposition? 

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In my area there is a guy with an old ice cream / food vendor truck. It is painted up with flames and chrome wheels. He shows up to a lot of "cruise ins" invited or not and opens his side doors to reveal huge speakers. Then he starts blasting what ever type of music he is in the mood for. At one venue I watched him get in an argument with the band that was being paid to perform.

 

One thing that was skipped is the car show announcer that loves to hear himself talk. He has a microphone and a captive audience. Look out.

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On 5/21/2019 at 7:31 PM, KongaMan said:

This thread serves as a reminder of why I don't go to car shows: the annoyance exceeds the pleasure.

 

Konga, this thread is, yes, about the undesirable

aspects of some shows.  But there are many GOOD

aspects of shows, too, so please keep those in mind as well.

 

Here are some positive aspects that I can think of:

 

(1)  Many interesting cars, original or correctly restored.

     On tours and other events, you don't get to see the cars as closely.

(2)  People that you know and talk to, and the leisure time to do so.

     You'll learn more about cars and sources, or get to know others better.

(3)  A chance to relax outdoors.  We all need some "down time" occasionally.

(4)  A way to raise money for a good cause.  Some shows are set up

     by non-profit organizations--car clubs and other groups. 

(5)  A chance to show your cars to an appreciative public.  What is

     routine to you, such as a bench seat or huge trunk, may be an

     astonishing wonder to a teen-ager just learning about cars.

     Give a "guided tour" of your car to those newcomers and watch their reactions!

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

 

Konga, this thread is, yes, about the undesirable

aspects of some shows.  But there are many GOOD

aspects of shows, too, so please keep those in mind as well.

 

Here are some positive aspects that I can think of:

 

(1)  Many interesting cars, original or correctly restored.

     On tours and other events, you don't get to see the cars as closely.

(2)  People that you know and talk to, and the leisure time to do so.

     You'll learn more about cars and sources, or get to know others better.

(3)  A chance to relax outdoors.  We all need some "down time" occasionally.

(4)  A way to raise money for a good cause.  Some shows are set up

     by non-profit organizations--car clubs and other groups. 

(5)  A chance to show your cars to an appreciative public.  What is

     routine to you, such as a bench seat or huge trunk, may be an

     astonishing wonder to a teen-ager just learning about cars.

     Give a "guided tour" of your car to those newcomers and watch their reactions!

Excellent advice!  Be an ambassador for your hobby interests.  

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4 hours ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

 

Konga, this thread is, yes, about the undesirable

aspects of some shows.  But there are many GOOD

aspects of shows, too, so please keep those in mind as well.

 

Here are some positive aspects that I can think of:

 

(1)  Many interesting cars, original or correctly restored.

     On tours and other events, you don't get to see the cars as closely.

(2)  People that you know and talk to, and the leisure time to do so.

     You'll learn more about cars and sources, or get to know others better.

(3)  A chance to relax outdoors.  We all need some "down time" occasionally.

(4)  A way to raise money for a good cause.  Some shows are set up

     by non-profit organizations--car clubs and other groups. 

(5)  A chance to show your cars to an appreciative public.  What is

     routine to you, such as a bench seat or huge trunk, may be an

     astonishing wonder to a teen-ager just learning about cars.

     Give a "guided tour" of your car to those newcomers and watch their reactions!

One might argue that #5 makes it quite a bit harder to engage in #s 1-3. ;)   That is, how do I look at your car or talk to you if I'm anchored to my car?

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Last Tuesday I provided my own music at a car show.  Sort of.  I was on the HCCA tour in Lancaster County, PA.  Tuesday was a short driving day, only 50 miles, and we visited a lot of Amish establishments, so I drove my newly-acquired 1904 Curved-Dash Oldsmobile.  A father and his three pre-teen kids, two boys and a girl,  took a special interest in my car, so I gave each kid a short ride.  When the girl got aboard, her father said:  "You look like you're in a courting buggy!"  I said this had been a courting buggy back in the day, and that a song had been written about it.   Then I sang "In My Merry Oldsmobile".  They seemed to like it.  But if I still had a day job, it would be a good idea not to quit it.

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3 hours ago, KongaMan said:

That is, how do I look at your car or talk to you if I'm anchored to my car?

 

Why in the world would you be anchored to your car? Get around, enjoy the show!👍

 

And if talking about cars is not relaxing, you're in the wrong hobby!😲

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2 hours ago, Frank DuVal said:

Why in the world would you be anchored to your car?

Because I'm supposed to be giving "guided tours".

 

2 hours ago, Frank DuVal said:

And if talking about cars is not relaxing, you're in the wrong hobby!

If you can find a car worth talking about.  Unless you like to talk about rice burners and new Mustangs.

 

As a matter of fact, one could argue that the better the show, the less reason to put your car in it.  Park in the lot, walk in, see what you want, then leave when you want.  All in all, a much more accommodating experience.

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I usually divide my time between walking around to

see the cars, and then relaxing near my car to explain it

to others.

 

At one small show, some 13-year-old girls were looking

at the rows of cars.  I gave a "guided tour" of a couple of them,

and it truly made it more interesting to these newcomers.

I pointed out that with old cars, you could enter on either side

and simply slide across the seat--that amazed them!

I had a Corvair owner open his front hood, and there was

no engine in that empty compartment--that surprised them too.

 

As ambassadors to the hobby and life-long car fans,

shows aren't merely what we ourselves can get out of them.

Life is more truly enjoyable when you can GIVE something to others.

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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The South Florida Region’s annual show on Biltmore Way in Coral Gables, FL used to have a DJ.  Then the city decided that the volume had to be below as certain decibel level 100 feet from the speakers.  That was fine until we learned we had to pay two city employees to come out and measure the volume and pay a fine if it was too loud. Needless to say we haven’t had music at that show for the last three years and no one seems miss it.  It makes for a much more pleasant day for talking with friends and spectators without the background noise.

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I like to talk to the knowledgeable car people about my car. I often get as much as I give. However when someone looks at one of my red  Buicks and says "My father had one just like this except it was a Ford and it was green. Boy these old cars rode like a dream" I just smile and be nice. Oy Vey..................Bob

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About 40 years ago I placed my first restored 1934 Ford Tudor in a Mall Show.   Inside the shopping mall with roped stantions mounted to the bumper ends to keep onlookers at least 3 feet from the car.  When I returned to the car there was a family sitting in the car bouncing up and down in all seats.   The father said "he had a Model T Roadster just like it".

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46 minutes ago, Paul Dobbin said:

  When I returned to the car there was a family sitting in the car bouncing up and down in all seats.  

 

GRRRR ! Some years ago a friend was displaying his Model A at a fall fair. He observed from a distance a fellow park his nearly new car and proceed to sit in the Model A,looking all around. My friend then went and sat in the newer car, looking all around,in the glove box,etc. The guy came running over, yelling and screaming. My friend calmly looked up him and asked "Oh, isn't it open house ? You were in my car".

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The  loud music is one thing, what I don't like is  finding somebody  sitting in my car either getting their picture taken, or having lunch.  I don't care about having my car judged. I keep the doors locked. If somebody wants to sit in my car, please ask me. I will be more than happy to oblige. John 

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Is that really a thing that happens people just getting into cars? I have been doing car shows for more than 40 years and have never ever seen that happen let alone have it happen to me. I cant imagine that the public going to a car show thinks its ok to just get into any car they want without asking. MOst people at shows are respectful even if they dont have cars they know that they are special and not toys. I see stories like that here all the time but I just cant rap my head around the idea that people would just open a door and get in with their family or let their kids climb on the cars like their playgrounds. A person that dumb wouldnt live long enough to make children.

 

I also dont like the loud music and Im totally sick of 50's doowop crap. How about some Floyd?

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Go to Auburn Indiana for the ACD reunion parade.   You have to put your car lighter in your pocket.  It will get stolen sooner or later.  I once came back to my 36 s/c phaeton to find a kid jumping up and down on the seat  moving the steering wheel back and forth, while dad was holding the door open with his foot on the running board , so mom  could take the video.   

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I was asked to take one of my old vehicles to a vintage agricultural show, run by a local church, I rode my 1927 Humber motorcycle there. When I left to go home, I found that somebody had unbolted and stolen the bulb horn!

 

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I haven't taken a vehicle to a show since.

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The fellow that owns the '32 Pontiac pictured at the beginning of this post had the rare Indian head rad cap stolen at a show. He was driving it a year later and decided to look around at a pawn shop.As he was leaving , the pawn shop owner came running out saying he might have something for the car. It was the missing rad cap !

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