70sWagoneers

Mount tires on Split Lock Ring Wheels - near Mooresville, NC

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On 5/20/2019 at 10:19 AM, 1937hd45 said:

Nice truck wheel, what brand truck is it? Bob

1929 Dodge Bros 3/4 ton.

 

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Not sure when the lock rings where no longer used and when the split rim was used. Did model A Ford use the lock ring into the 40’s on their lite weight trucks?

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I did the three on the back of my Pierce right after getting back with new tires from Charlotte. I took my time, and didn’t have to worry about the paint on my car. One thing I loved is the rim locking tab my car has, I could use three more of these clamp strips, but I was able to play musical chairs with them and once inflated that rim becomes a non-issue. I did still wrap a pair of tie-down straps around the rim just in case and I would not want to work on anything that has good paint, I’m sure it would have been chipped badly along the way.

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Those clamp strips look fairly easy to make.

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Not to hijack the thread, but that is my plan once I get done going through the engine. It has a hole, a slightly slotted hole and is just slightly cupped to fit the rim, will take an hour at best...

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Posted (edited)

Remember the largest danger is cracked rings from the chroming process. They get hydrogen embrittlement and crack and fail under the chrome........as an example....here is a NEW rim, ring, spokes, and hub........and a failure. The tow truck driver kept sticking his face near the tire to tie the car down......I had to cuss him out three times to get it through his head that the wheel was a lit bomb ready to explode. You can't fix stupid. 

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Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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James - I am in the Charlotte area and believe I was a previous owner of your Auburn. I can help you and have sent a PM. David

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On 5/22/2019 at 3:23 PM, edinmass said:

Remember the largest danger is cracked rings from the chroming process. They get hydrogen embrittlement and crack and fail under the chrome........as an example....here is a NEW rim, ring, spokes, and hub........and a failure. The tow truck driver kept sticking his face near the tire to tie the car down......I had to cuss him out three times to get it through his head that the wheel was a lit bomb ready to explode. You can't fix stupid. 

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This is pretty horrific by the way (aka how people get hurt and killed) !

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On ‎5‎/‎22‎/‎2019 at 3:23 PM, edinmass said:

Remember the largest danger is cracked rings from the chroming process. They get hydrogen embrittlement and crack and fail under the chrome........as an example....here is a NEW rim, ring, spokes, and hub........and a failure. The tow truck driver kept sticking his face near the tire to tie the car down......I had to cuss him out three times to get it through his head that the wheel was a lit bomb ready to explode. You can't fix stupid. 

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Ed, Did this ring just decide to fail in the middle of the day, or did someone hit it or catch a pot hole or curb? Bob 

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To all "newbies" reading this PLEASE CONSIDER THIS WARNING! do not take it lightly . Listen to what John and Ed say! there are some of us that have been in the "hobby" for decades that have dealt with this for many years and still are here because were didn't lose a limb or get killed trying to deal with a lock ring that flew off while working on it. A close friend was a service writer at a Cadillac agency 35+ years ago and was a good mechanic as well, but when he went to dismantle, then mount new tires on his 31 Franklin I was the one that did it for the most part for him. Just working with tire irons if you aren't used to doing so , can see one flip up and catch you in the face , break a tooth, take out an eye etc. Have someone teach you the proper way how to do it , there is no "fast" way . Respect what you are working on , proceed with caution , and save yourself a trip to the hospital.

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On 5/22/2019 at 3:23 PM, edinmass said:

Remember the largest danger is cracked rings from the chroming process. They get hydrogen embrittlement and crack and fail under the chrome........as an example....here is a NEW rim, ring, spokes, and hub........and a failure. The tow truck driver kept sticking his face near the tire to tie the car down......I had to cuss him out three times to get it through his head that the wheel was a lit bomb ready to explode. You can't fix stupid. 

 

I may be missing something but is seems like it have been safer to deflate the tire before securing the car to the tow truck.

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44 minutes ago, Roger Frazee said:

I may be missing something but is seems like it have been safer to deflate the tire before securing the car to the tow truck.

 

We were in the hills of the White Mountains in Nh. No adiquate tools, and also....it was a one off Model J, so taking any unnecessary risk wasn't going to be an option. 

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Posted (edited)

If the tire wasn't deflated all the way it could make the situation more dangers, because it's the bulge of the tire sidewall that is a big part of forcing the snap ring down into it's retaining groove in the wheel rim. Especially one that is broken and no longer has the spring tension of a complete 360 degree ring shape to hold it in place. Many an unbroken snap ring that didn't have enough of that spring tension, has come off while driving as a tire went flat and the sidewalls deflected inward.

 

And, completely deflating the tire could damage an expensive tire and tube, and/or, the rim, as the car is moved unto a transporter, or a to a safe place to work on it. Best to leave the tire pressurized until it's ready to be deflated and removed for repair.

 

If your worried about the snap ring popping off  while having to move the car, remember that tow rope I mentioned earlier ? Use it to lace the tire and snap ring pieces to the rim until you can get it to where you can safely let all the air pressure out of the tire.  

 

Paul.  

Edited by PFitz (see edit history)

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The ring failed while on tour.......no pot hole or impact. All six wheels, hubs, spokes, snap rings, tires and tubes were new with less than 200 miles on them. No one has mentioned how to safely deal with this situation. Very simple. Place a floor jack under the rear end, and from a safe angle, use an ice pick to deflate the tire. Fact is the cost of the tire, tube snap ring, and wheel are meaningless. It’s possible the ring or the rim could have had manufacturing issues. Thus, the only safe option is to remove the pressure and the hell with what it costs, even if it ruins a tire and tube. The rings are safe IF you know what you are doing, and have the correct equipment. 99 percent of the people don’t have enough experience with these things.........and that is a deadly mistake. I have a routine to work on snap ring wheels.......and NEVER vary it. I usually do them late at night....no phone calls, no visitors, no distraction......no radio......nothing. Now in my 50’s three of these an evening is my limit. Your always banged up, bruised, bleeding and a sweaty mess when finished. It’s a dirty and physical job.......not so much the ring as the tire and tube........after changing I leave the tire in the sun for a day to be sure it relaxes and is in its final position, and it also allows for small slow leaks. I NEVER reuse any tube ever, never. No patching either. My car, my time, and my life aren’t worth the aggravation. Chrome snap rings on chrome wheels are easy, the painted rims are always a royalpain in the axx.

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Maybe Bugatti was paranoid about loosing lock rings when he designed his GP wheels. 

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Posted (edited)
On 5/25/2019 at 11:40 AM, Roger Frazee said:

I may be missing something but is seems like it have been safer to deflate the tire before securing the car to the tow truck.

 

On 5/25/2019 at 3:57 PM, edinmass said:

The ring failed while on tour.......no pot hole or impact. All six wheels, hubs, spokes, snap rings, tires and tubes were new with less than 200 miles on them. No one has mentioned how to safely deal with this situation. Very simple. Place a floor jack under the rear end, and from a safe angle, use an ice pick to deflate the tire. Fact is the cost of the tire, tube snap ring, and wheel are meaningless. It’s possible the ring or the rim could have had manufacturing issues. Thus, the only safe option is to remove the pressure and the hell with what it costs, even if it ruins a tire and tube. The rings are safe IF you know what you are doing, and have the correct equipment. 99 percent of the people don’t have enough experience with these things.........and that is a deadly mistake. I have a routine to work on snap ring wheels.......and NEVER vary it. I usually do them late at night....no phone calls, no visitors, no distraction......no radio......nothing. Now in my 50’s three of these an evening is my limit. Your always banged up, bruised, bleeding and a sweaty mess when finished. It’s a dirty and physical job.......not so much the ring as the tire and tube........after changing I leave the tire in the sun for a day to be sure it relaxes and is in its final position, and it also allows for small slow leaks. I NEVER reuse any tube ever, never. No patching either. My car, my time, and my life aren’t worth the aggravation. Chrome snap rings on chrome wheels are easy, the painted rims are always a royalpain in the axx.

Ed's comments sums this up nicely.  

 

I have a set of 4 extra long tie downs and wrap them around rim/tire and padlocked the ends OR I put 5ish lbs in them and then take them to a truck shop to inflate in their cage.

 

Regarding a broken rim like on the Duesenberg, it was a smart move to just call it a day and deal with the problem on nice solid ground with the proper tools (ie Ed is correct in that this wheel you want to be nowhere around matched to you would not want to deflate the tire without the car properly jacked up first to relieve any weight off).  I might have even been more cautious than an ice pick (some time ago I bought a 10" or  so long value removal tool) and definitely would be working from the backside. 

 

Paul Fitzpatrick sums this up nicely too (Paul helped me with countless advice and projects when doing the 30 Franklin 147 Dietrich Speedster Convertible Sedan and was very use to him via Franklin Treks) !

 

 

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)

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