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Jerry Jenkins

1928 Chrylser Imperial

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Hello,

I'm trying to get some help, any advice would be greatly appreciated!

My client has a 1926 Chrysler Imperial and he thinks it's a 7 passenger limo, I'm looking for help identifying
the model, potential value, and where to find a buyer? 
 

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Looks to be a 1926 Chrysler Imperial E-80. Total production of 1926 E-80s was 9,114 units built. It is NOT the limo. The limo has a glass partition between the driver's compartment and the rear passenger compartment. The one you show is just the 7 passenger sedan.

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)

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Those don't look like factory gauges to me. VDO? I also suspect it has been converted to 12 volts if it's using those gauges.

 

Sadly, cars like that have very little value in today's market. Very tough to sell. If it's fully operational and driveable, it might bring $8-10,000 if you can find the right guy. 7-passenger sedans are just about the lowest on the pecking order of desirability and '20s cars that aren't Packards are limited in their appeal. Chrysler was building high-quality cars but their conservative design and performance (45 MPH) really limit their appeal to today's buyers. Add in the incorrect and dated color combination and it will be an uphill battle to pull a big figure. I'd put it on eBay with a $5000 starting bid and no reserve and cut it loose.

 

I wish it were otherwise with these cars, but that's reality and it won't get better in the future. Off-brand pre-war sedans are in a death spiral where they're worth less and less each year. It hurts to hear, but it's reality. Sorry.

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An Imperial 80 is a very nice car. I am quite fond of then myself. However a 7 pas. sedan is not a high demand body style. Your client's car looks to be in very nice condition. Unless priced reasonably they can be a somewhat hard sell , as Matt suggests. And he has a ton of experience in the hobby car market.

 As to where to find a buyer I would suggest you advertise the car in as many different old car spots as you car. This forum as well as prewarcar are probably good places to start.

There is a good chance the person interested in buying will be in Europe so don't limit your advertising to the U.S.A.

 

Greg

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)

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The FEDCO plate on the dashboard says EW402D which says it is a 1926 E-80 built in August of 1926.

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5 minutes ago, GregLaR said:

The Ontario car certainly looks like the same one.

What was the date of that sale?

Same car.

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13 minutes ago, GregLaR said:

The Ontario car certainly looks like the same one.

What was the date of that sale?

 

Good observation and detective work, Greg!

That Canadian car has the same incorrect gages

as the Imperial currently in question.  And note that

that sale would have been in CANADIAN dollars, too--

perhaps the equivalent of $13,000 U. S., depending

on when the sale was.

 

The car in Australia shows what the gauges really

should look like.

 

I agree with Matt H. that a 1926 Imperial sedan,

regrettably, doesn't have a lot of followers or a big

potential market.  The colors look like the choice

of a 1970's restorer, as there were a lot of tan-painted

old cars in that decade.  At the right price, however,

someone will appreciate this old car.

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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Note the 7,000 RPM tach!  That engine probably has a 3,000 RPM redline.

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I hate to say it, but value is pretty limited - if they get anything 15K to 20K they should be happy and if more then that is great, but I would not be holding my breath waiting for the more.   Spend your time to market it properly (cleaned and well photographed too).

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5 hours ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

 

Good observation and detective work, Greg!

 

Thanks, but kudos go to Keiser for finding this one.

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Imperial 80 was Chrysler's top car at the time. Chrysler was one of the last holdouts of "big six" motors when other luxury cars were going to straight eights.  They were selling against cars like Cadillac and Packard six. In 1928 they advertised America's most powerful car, 112HP. They would do a lot better than 45 MPH, the 80 referred to 80MPH top speed. Although you would be a lot happier driving it 45 especially the top heavy 7 passenger sedan. Unfortunately as others have pointed out, no matter how good they were in 1926 the demand is not there today.

Edited by Rusty_OToole (see edit history)

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