DB26

1926 Dodge Brothers Axel Nut Torque?

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Hey everyone,

 

I just need a little clarification. I’m going to be doing my brakes soon, so I had my rear drums off to analyze them before I buy the material. I’ve been told to torque the axel nut to about 150 foot pounds torque when reassembling. I’ve also read that ( sorry cannot find the post reference) it’s not good to torque that high, torque wasn’t practice in the 20s, and something lower like 60-90 will do. Any thoughts?

 

Also I assume, since there is a cotter pin, to apply the torque, and then back off the nut (as opposed to tightening it) in order for the cotter pin to slide in. Would that be correct?

 

Thanks

 

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Im not sure of the torque for that particular year but 150 sounds reasonable. Make sure the tapers are clean and dry and tighten to the next hole if necessary never back off. It is critical that the taper fits tight and does the driving, if not your chances  of cracking or breaking the axle in use go up greatly.

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Kenendcindyc said:

tighten to the next hole if necessary never back off.

Never back off.

 

There is only one application where you back off.  The steering sockets where you tighten until the spring is totally compressed and then back off until the cotter pin lines up.

 

150# sounds right.

Edited by Tinindian (see edit history)
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Noted! Thanks, I will take the drums back off, clean and debur the axels and retorque to 150 foot pounds. 

 

Now, I assume since I am never to back off, If after I reach 150 foot pounds and the cotter pin will not slide in, a further tightening beyond 150 won’t harm it much?

 

I only ask because I know someone on this forum believes the metallurgy used at this time period wasn’t designed for that much torque and can break. 

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You should be fine. If it’s way off you can try swapping nuts side to side to get closer. But I believe that nut is 7/8 16 tread and even if it’s weak steel (and it’s not) 150 ft lbs is not even getting close to its limit. 

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I do my 1930 Dodge 8 up to that sort of torque (me standing on a bar) and when I come back they are not that tight. You have to ensure the hub will not "walk" on the taper with the large forces imposed in cornering. Also, make sure the nut does not bottom against the shoulder on the axle, but acts on the hub.

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It's a German spec, I believe; guttentite....

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You'd be amazed what the effect of a love tap to the hub will do.

Anything to shock the hub will help it seat better.

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