broker-len

Painting wire wheels

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We went through this before-------------32 plymouth     wheels good shape no rust and does not need to be trued       I sand blasted them  do not want to powder coat    overkill for me         I bought Epoxy primer    but also think overkill     I have painted several cars but am wondering if I can get inside spokes at the hub and all around the spokes      what has your experience been and what kind of paint did you use          friend with Ford A    had them dipped   what do you think

plymouth show.jpg

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Get a hub and spindle and make a fixture that you can spin the wheel on. Paint the back first, then the front. You have later wheels with the lug nuts under the hub cap, that are a lot easier to do. Plan to have a place to set the finished wheel before starting the others. You'll figure out how the spray pattern works best in the primer stage. Glad you are painting and not powdering them. Bob 

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Seems like it would take quite a large volume of paint to dip.  Okay for a factory, but if you are only doing 5 or 6 wheels?

 

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You want a wheel spinner for wire wheels, wire wheels eat a lot of paint, you could use spray bomb, but you will need a lot.  I sprayed 80% of mine from the back of the wheels.  

 

Did you get a quote for powder coat?  You say it is overkill, I don't look at powder coat that way, it is easy and cheap, great coating, somewhat limited colors.  If I was not fastidious about color I would have powder coated mine.  Mine are "Fawn and Green" I color matched mine, after spending hours and hours hand sanding a spot of remaining original color inside the wheel under the hub cap.

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14 hours ago, Akstraw said:

Seems like it would take quite a large volume of paint to dip.  Okay for a factory, but if you are only doing 5 or 6 wheels?

 

If you're using an oil based paint, you can fill a large enough container with mostly water, and float just  a layer of paint on top.  As you dip the piece through the paint layer, by the time it hits the water it is covered in a waterproof coating and it will not wash off or harm the paint.  I've experimented with this technique on smaller pieces and it does work.

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I agree,

Those that poo-poo powder coating are missing out.

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agree    the powder coat is far superior in looks and probably wares the best     but     I look at the value of the car and the money invested also not crazy about handing some thing over to some one else that I have owned for 40 years and I can not replace      and there ARE some negatives with this option     I did get one quote        locally           $ 80.00   per wheel      

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Have you priced paint ?  Perhaps cream is a different story, but if I were buying a gallon of red-maroon $80.00 each for Powder Coating is a deal and the finish is really great and durable too.   Perhaps do not look for a Powder Coater but look to someone who restores bent rims. 

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John, your so right--I just spent $22.00 for a factory mix rattle can--& was black---Tom

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11 minutes ago, 13CADDY said:

John, your so right--I just spent $22.00 for a factory mix rattle can--& was black---Tom

I just bought a half sized factory rattle can of 1972 Mercedes Dark Red 542-G and it was a bargain at $37.50 (I think a gallon will be like $800.00 +).

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just get an E mail from some in California        look at the wheels     they are rustoleum primer and top coat Krylon !!!!!        any comments ?

plymouth rust wheels.jpg

Edited by broker-len (see edit history)
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I think you've gotten all the advice there is to be had on this topic. If powder is a no-go, then I think Bob's idea about hanging it on a spindle, giving it a gentle spin, and painting it, starting from the back, is your best suggestion. To maybe make the most of your paint, maybe stack the wheels together so anything that passes through the spokes of the first wheel at least lands on the second, but that might be more trouble than it's worth.

 

There's no good trick to painting wire wheels and if dipping isn't possible, you should expect quite a bit of waste with the paint. Use an enclosure of some kind so it at least doesn't go all over your shop or into the environment.


Just out of curiosity, did the $80/wheel the powdercoater quoted include sandblasting them? My powder guy doesn't want me sandblasting anything because he'll just do it again with his sterile air supply and blast media so that there are no contaminants. $80/wheel is actually pretty reasonable and I bet you'll burn through $500 worth of paint and time doing it yourself anyway. Just a thought...

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20 hours ago, broker-len said:

just get an E mail from some in California        look at the wheels     they are rustoleum primer and top coat Krylon !!!!!        any comments ?

plymouth rust wheels.jpg

I actually did the same on a friends Model A - it sat for eons with the wheels off of it and he wanted to send it over to his daughters house and had no way to move it -  the wheels were in primer and never painted so I put on the "new" 40 year old tires that had never been mounted, taped them up, and shot them with a rattle can  - doubt they would win an AACA event, but they looked pretty nice all things considered and my guess is 20 years from now and the next owner(s) later will be unchanged.   I would have powder coated them though if the fellow had a dime to his name - the Model A was about all he accumulated in his life and between his rent, his garage space rent, food, and ... and I doubt he has an extra $5.00 a month to spare (I bought the rattle cans and donated my time). 

 

By the way, a couple years ago a friend brush painted his wheels on his 1928 Lagonda high chassis touring - they looked good then and they 15 years later still look good now (he joked at the time that they were probably nicer done than when new and all joking aside he was probably correct in that statement). 

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)
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I'd like to see a photo of that 1930 Lagonda, I had a rolling chassis less body from 1933, sold it without really thinking of things in the far off future. Bob 

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31 minutes ago, 1937hd45 said:

I'd like to see a photo of that 1930 Lagonda, I had a rolling chassis less body from 1933, sold it without really thinking of things in the far off future. Bob 

1928 - Sorry about getting year initially wrong. 28_Lagonda_2Ltr_HighChassis_DV-07-CC_01.thumb.jpg.11064e9681ea28da63334418d3b531d3.jpg

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Thanks John, That is how I'd pictured mine, but it had unique cycle type front fenders and a Wilson preselector gear box. Bob 

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