Sign in to follow this  
Rusty_OToole

Why driving a Model A is insanely difficult

Recommended Posts

Confuse-us say : Old man go to wake up. Find out not his world anymore.   -   Confused Carl 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Model As are pretty rugged.  Anyone who practices a bit can get the hang of one in fairly short order.  It behooves any new driver of an A or any prewar car to learn a bit about mechanical and technology limitations of the vehicle.  Stopping ability, cornering, no signals are bigger factors to me than learning how to use the non synchro box.  Understanding 90% of the other drivers on the road dont understand those limits is really critical.

 

Exposing anyone to these cars is really the best way to spread interest.

Edited by Steve_Mack_CT (see edit history)
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My father taught me to drive when I was 14 on our 1930 Model A roadster. I'd been starting the cars for years anyway, so I was already good at that, and I had a rudimentary understanding of the shifting process. But nothing beats practice. The kid in the video got the hang of it pretty quickly and I bet another 20 minutes of driving without also trying to film a video and he would have been motoring it as well as anyone. I'm irritated that his friend told him to retard the spark at idle so he felt he had to keep moving the spark lever while he drove and he'd be more successful at the double-clutch if he did it faster. That would come with a little practice--I remember the first time I nailed a clash-free downshift from 3-2 in that Model A and I was so proud of myself, although all my father said to me was, "That's how you're supposed to do it." Bah.

 

I think the really important thing to see in this video is how much fun that kid is having. He's grinning and laughing and having a great time. He tried something new and found it enjoyable and now he can tell his friends that old cars aren't so scary, they're not hard to drive, and that they pretty much work like other cars. THAT is exactly the kind of introductions we need to do to young people so they understand that these aren't horseless buggies or steam engines, they're just cars like any other and if used properly, they work like cars. Put a kid in the driver's seat and let him drive your car to see what happens. The hardware is heavy-duty, he won't hurt it even if it's totally ham-fisted. I do it with my young staff members and when my son is 14 next year, I'll probably take him out in the parking lot and teach him to drive, both automatic and standard, synchromesh and non-synchro. By the time he's 16, he'll be driving one of the cars to shows with me. That's the plan, anyway...

 

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When our oldest daughter was six she was sitting in my 1912 T and said she could touch the pedals. I fired it up and she drove up the street on my lap to show Grandma. Easy car if you keep in in Low. Bob . 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

 

Sounds like you're demanding a safe space more than any of the kids. The kids aren't telling you to keep out of their clubs, they're not telling you that your car is uninteresting, they're not telling you that you're foolish for not embracing technology. In fact, I bet if you showed up with your Model T at one of their events, you'd be treated like a celebrity and there would be a great deal of curiosity about the machinery. Would a kid with, say, a 1988 Honda Prelude (which is AACA eligible) feel the same at Hershey? We all know the answer to that one.

 

There's a group very loudly demanding that the world conform to their wants, but it doesn't appear to be the kids...

A lot of people forget how they became interested in cars - it generally came from seeing them, someone giving them a ride, someone letting them drive, someone showing the features of their car, and ...  My mom's cousing had a car collection that was pretty stellar,  my parents had sports cars, Dad's first employee daily drove a 1929 Stearns Knight that was some time or another over a week parked in our drive, we had an extra garage spot and someone's something or another was always parked in it, there was awesome stuff running around our neighborhood, and ...

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

My dad owned cars that were well used and required lots of shade tree fixes as we did not have a garage to work in.  I helped him as best I could.  Dad was a bit grumpy when a car refused to work after some of his fixes so I knew when to step aside when it got to that point.  Still he taught me a lot.

 

One of my real inspirations was a local guy who raced dirt track cars, the old flathead Ford type and then the later overhead valve stuff. He would let me “help” with the work which was mostly gathering tools and handling him parts.  He always had time for me and my questions.  Look at the Rapid Roy Stock Car Boy video on YouTube, that really brings back memories of him when I watch it.

Edited by TerryB (see edit history)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought the kid really enjoyed himself, and what wrong with that?

My old farmer neighbor died and left his Miata to his daughter who does not drive stick shift.

But her 13 year old son comes home from school everyday and drives the Miata around in the 

pasture and up and down the driveway, getting better every day.  Reminds me of myself at 13!

Iv'e even had him drive over to ask me questions and learn.  Might have a gar guy in the making,

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, John_Mereness said:

A lot of people forget how they became interested in cars - it generally came from seeing them, someone giving them a ride, someone letting them drive, someone showing the features of their car, and ...  My mom's cousing had a car collection that was pretty stellar,  my parents had sports cars, Dad's first employee daily drove a 1929 Stearns Knight that was some time or another over a week parked in our drive, we had an extra garage spot and someone's something or another was always parked in it, there was awesome stuff running around our neighborhood, and ...

Indeed John.  My interest came from family friends, and a ride in a freshly restored 31 A Deluxe roadster.  Rumbleseat, inculding a short stint on the highway, it was a 55 mph limit in those days so right lane in an A was not really ridicules.  Easy to draw the connection why, 10 or so hobby cars later, I am back in an A, oh and it is a 30 roadster!  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this