Dynaflash8

Is hobby interest in pre-WWII cars Dying?

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Backlash. Your comment on color of yellow reminded me of one of our salesmen he never sold a maroon car but sure sold a lot of ruby red one  he was good at selling the sizzle and not the steak. 

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1 hour ago, ted sweet said:

interest is dying in cars made before 1970

I had a 1964 Impala SS convert GONE a 1968 GTO GONE and a 1966 Biscayne factory BB 2 door and GONE also. I now have a 1912 1915 and my newer car is a 1930 and I do not have time for coffee and cars as I am out driving them. No they are not dying out you are in the wrong circle of people.

So if you want to join in on an AACA vintage tour come to Kingston On. in August   

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Posted (edited)
54 minutes ago, TerryB said:

The last great car was made in _____.  Feel free to fill in the blanks!🙂

 

 

That's easy, 1969. Chevron B 16. What more would anyone need ? {apart from a nickel era stablemate}

 

45_1.jpg

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)

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1 hour ago, TerryB said:

The last great car was made in _____.  Feel free to fill in the blanks!🙂

I see you are asking for a year only and that would be 1934.

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Dynaflash8 said:

For Terry B:  I don't know why this didn't post.  I said, every time you start feeling sorry for yourself, you find somebody who is making do with a whole lot worse health problem.  I thought you wee Terry Bond, another former AACA National President like myself.  Finally since you've posted since then about your Lionel trains.  I have a whole raft of early post-War Lionel trains and one pre-War set, plus all sorts of rare, semi-rare or just old accessories, transformers and switches.  I've thought of selling that stuff to a collector, but have been too lazy to dig it all out.  From what you say, maybe I ought not to bother and just let the family yard sale it someday when I'm gone.  Thanks for your comments Terry....thanks very much.  Let's just keep keeping on.  My main set is a 1946 2020 Pennsy Turbine.  It got it that year for Christmas.

 

Edited by Dynaflash8 (see edit history)
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9 hours ago, 1937hd45 said:

THANK YOU! The hobby will be fine without the iPhone people. Bob 

 

I know this comment does not help Earl, but the above attitude is WHY young people are not buying the older cars.

 

Why would they, when people already in the hobby just want them to go away and take their phones with them! Such welcoming of younger people, just feel the love.......

 

Since 99% of people under 60 have phones, who is left to continue the hobby if we are fine without iPhone people? Or are Android phones OK? If so I need to leave... 

 

Personally I like yellow cars with skirts (avatar picture doesn't show it, the Graham has rear skirts), spotlight and Trippe Lights!

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2 minutes ago, Frank DuVal said:

 

I know this comment does not help Earl, but the above attitude is WHY young people are not buying the older cars.

 

Why would they, when people already in the hobby just want them to go away and take their phones with them! Such welcoming of younger people, just feel the love.......

 

Since 99% of people under 60 have phones, who is left to continue the hobby if we are fine without iPhone people? Or are Android phones OK? If so I need to leave... 

 

Personally I like yellow cars with skirts (avatar picture doesn't show it, the Graham has rear skirts), spotlight and Trippe Lights!

I remember not long ago when Trippe Lights were the most desirable accessory one could find for their old car.  You live in Fredericksburg?  The happiest years of my life were living in Montross, 35 miles east of Fredericksburg.  Sebring, FL is 360 degrees out of sinc with Montross.  If we can get well soon enough, I still want to sell out of here and go back to Montross.  Sadly, my wife and I don't see that happening.

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2 hours ago, ted sweet said:

interest is dying in cars made before 1970

 

The guy who dumped 22 million on the Duesenberg last August didn’t get the above memo......

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Just now, edinmass said:

 

The guy who dumped 22 million on the Duesenberg last August didn’t get the above memo......

Maybe his iPhone wasn't working. 

 

Bob 

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12 minutes ago, Frank DuVal said:

 

I know this comment does not help Earl, but the above attitude is WHY young people are not buying the older cars.

 

Why would they, when people already in the hobby just want them to go away and take their phones with them! Such welcoming of younger people, just feel the love.......

 

Since 99% of people under 60 have phones, who is left to continue the hobby if we are fine without iPhone people? Or are Android phones OK? If so I need to leave... 

 

Personally I like yellow cars with skirts (avatar picture doesn't show it, the Graham has rear skirts), spotlight and Trippe Lights!

 

Do you really think young people are concerned if people old enough to be their parents approve of their hand held devices ? Either you get the social media thing or you don't , either you get the old car thing or you don't.

 There is absolutely no correlation between social media attitudes amongst the existing old car hobbyist's  and the number of younger; social media savvy or otherwise, people becoming interested in the old car hobby.

 Most people who chose not to be social media involved really don't care if others are involved. Each can indulge in whatever turns their crank.  I think that there are many ways to waste time, some don't even involve social media. It's a personal choice , nothing else.

 I don't think social media people are necessarily bad people. We all had things in our youth we later grew out of and even regretted as we gained wisdom and maturity.

 

 

Greg in Canada

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Speaking for myself i have never really had any interest in anything before 1939 or so.  At least to own. I do admire some individual cars and styles and a lot of the early engineering but really only am excited by cars from about 1939 to 1985 or so.

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When you're selling a car, it isn't about what you like anymore.

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4 hours ago, KongaMan said:

When you're selling a car, it isn't about what you like anymore.

Well it is if nobody else likes what you like, bought and paid good money for. 😀

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One more short comment on ANY pre war car.......the younger generation of old car buyers almost exclusively want two doors.........touring cars and sport phaetons were once the top of the heap, now it's roadsters, coupe, conv coupe, phaeton, touring, club sedan, town car, conv sedan, and sedan.......basicly in the exact order I listed the cars. Many collectors will not buy a convertible sedan for a bunch of reasons, and having owned more than 50 pre war cars, I have never purchased one even to flip.......they have always been a hard sell. 

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23 hours ago, Dynaflash8 said:

 Do you agree that Millenium's simply aren't interested in the wonderful old straight 8 Buick's anymore.  There was a time when 1936-1941 Buicks were steaming hot.  I have maybe loved mine too long.  Think so? 

Millenials were not around in Buicks 'Glory Days' when buying one brand new really meant something.   A good many Buicks were 'steaming hot' up until 1972 and then became less with one or two of interest to collectors in the 1980's and early 1990's.  From 1973, the marque became a badge-engineered generic GM product with few exceptions.  And GM's malaise of the later 1970's and the Roger Smith years only downgraded Buick's status and build quality.  Even the late '80s & early '90s Rivieras and Reattas aren't appreciated like a pre-war, early Riviera, A-body Gran Sport, or a Grand National.  The marque lost its direction so bad that today, Buick is totally indistinguishable among all the lower-to-mid priced offerings from the Japanese, German, and other domestic manufactures that it doesn't mean a thing or make a statement to a Millenial.   Buy a brand new Buick today, you might get asked why you didn't buy a Kia Stinger by a co-worker.

 

Craig

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3 hours ago, edinmass said:

One more short comment on ANY pre war car.......the younger generation of old car buyers almost exclusively want two doors.........touring cars and sport phaetons were once the top of the heap, now it's roadsters, coupe, conv coupe, phaeton, touring, club sedan, town car, conv sedan, and sedan.......basicly in the exact order I listed the cars. Many collectors will not buy a convertible sedan for a bunch of reasons, and having owned more than 50 pre war cars, I have never purchased one even to flip.......they have always been a hard sell. 

Us younger generation of the 50's and 60's also wanted two doors.

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, 8E45E said:

Millenials were not around in Buicks 'Glory Days' when buying one brand new really meant something.   A good many Buicks were 'steaming hot' up until 1972 and then became less with one or two of interest to collectors in the 1980's and early 1990's.  From 1973, the marque became a badge-engineered generic GM product with few exceptions.  And GM's malaise of the later 1970's and the Roger Smith years only downgraded Buick's status and build quality.  Even the late '80s & early '90s Rivieras and Reattas aren't appreciated like a pre-war, early Riviera, A-body Gran Sport, or a Grand National.  The marque lost its direction so bad that today, Buick is totally indistinguishable among all the lower-to-mid priced offerings from the Japanese, German, and other domestic manufactures that it doesn't mean a thing or make a statement to a Millenial.   Buy a brand new Buick today, you might get asked why you didn't buy a Kia Stinger by a co-worker.

 

Craig

Badge engineered. That's what happened to Oldsmobile and Pontiac. When you remove the heart out of the product the product ceases to exist. In Pontiac's case the last REAL Pontiac made was in the very early 80's, and only on some models. By the time the corporation got around to axing Pontiac and Oldsmobile it really didn't matter because Pontiac and Olds people/fans knew those brands had died years before. If Buick goes tomorrow there will be no loss,  the middle class who bought Buick Olds and Pontiac are going too,  which might have something to do with the welfare of the hobby in general in the future. 

Edited by Pfeil (see edit history)

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Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, Dynaflash8 said:

Well it is if nobody else likes what you like, bought and paid good money for. 😀

 

I think there are many of us who think your car is very nice. But few of us are able to afford a car in your price range.  I am more or less forever stuck in the $10,000 - $12, 000 price range, and I had a decent middle class job up to my retirement.  In aggregate I have of course spent at least double the value of your car within the hobby. However that was spread out over the 40 + years I have been involved. At no single  point did I have anywhere near that much money at my disposal, and I would never borrow that heavily on a want.  And I suspect my situation is more common than many think.

 I have always looked at my car hobby spending as old car university tuition. Unfortunately just as I received my degree I had to retire.

 Yes, there are many people more affluent within the hobby.  But I get the feeling they are after bigger fish than your Buick.

I think you are probably in the unenviable situation of where most people attracted to your car simply can't afford it.

 

Greg in Canada

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)
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Whatever else old collector cars are, they're a luxury, one doesn't have to have one to live.  Sure, they can provide many enjoyable, worthwhile experiences, but so too can other avenues and activities which are less costly and less logistically challenging, especially for urban dwellers.  Current demographic trends are increasingly toward discretionary spending for experiential enjoyment.   Travel to participate in recreational, athletic activities consumes far more interests now than does the ownership of things to achieve that end. 

Car collecting isn't being helped by a generation raised on non-involvement with cars in general.  We're all familiar with the constant attention functional systems of old cars require to keep them in operating condition.  Since the advent of computerized engine electronic and fuel control, maintenance free chassis components and even less frequent oil changes have changed the attitude toward cars to that of an appliance. 

 

Those auction examples where significantly high prices are paid for rare, highly desirable cars are anomalies in the overall scheme of things.  Its done by people insulated from the realities of life of the majority of the population by their wealth.   For those with ordinary, run-of-the-mill, production cars, even in fine condition, the next owner has to perceive its ownership will be a genuine benefit in enough ways to even consider the price being ask.   For younger people already strapped with demands on their disposable income, such an expenditure is viewed as unnecessary or simply beyond their capability.

 

Off the soapbox.

Steve

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Great points Steve, You don't need a registered vehicle to enjoy the hobby, I've never been turned away from an event for lack of a vehicle in 58 years. I'd rather spend the money on the  week of Pebble Beach than spend the money on my car projects. Looking at cars today gives me the same pleasure  it did at age ten, I just miss the people I met along the way that aren't here any more. Bob 

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9 hours ago, Dynaflash8 said:

Well it is if nobody else likes what you like, bought and paid good money for. 😀

It's not about like; it's about value.  People like the car fine; they just don't value it at the asking price.  Which is to say that the car is worth more to you than it is to them.  Which means that you need to decide whether your primary motivation is to preserve the car as is or cash out.  If you want to preserve it, you might well end up leaving it for your heirs and assigns to dispose of -- which will likely be done with great dispatch and for far less.  If you want to get what you can, you might take some of the earlier advice and at least take a couple of pictures with the Trippe lights and skirts removed.  That may not be your taste, but it isn't your taste that's going to drive the decision to buy.

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I like your car! Don't change anything. Doing so would be a fool's errand. IMO the person who buys the car will love it for what it is, not what they think that it can be. I don't think that you can love a car for "too long." Selling a car because you think that you should, is the wrong reason. You obviously still love the car and are frustrated that the market value is less then what you believe the car is worth. If it were my car I would hang on to it, but if you still think that you must sell it, be patient. On the rare occasion I sell a car, it is to the person whom I choose for the car. The bottom line is not why I got into the hobby, and I'm not going to change now. I trust that you will know the right person when he comes calling.

 

Bill

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21 minutes ago, KongaMan said:

It's not about like; it's about value.  People like the car fine; they just don't value it at the asking price.  Which is to say that the car is worth more to you than it is to them.  Which means that you need to decide whether your primary motivation is to preserve the car as is or cash out.  If you want to preserve it, you might well end up leaving it for your heirs and assigns to dispose of -- which will likely be done with great dispatch and for far less.  If you want to get what you can, you might take some of the earlier advice and at least take a couple of pictures with the Trippe lights and skirts removed.  That may not be your taste, but it isn't your taste that's going to drive the decision to buy.

 

13 minutes ago, Buffalowed Bill said:

I like your car! Don't change anything. Doing so would be a fool's errand. IMO the person who buys the car will love it for what it is, not what they think that it can be. I don't think that you can love a car for "too long." Selling a car because you think that you should, is the wrong reason. You obviously still love the car and are frustrated that the market value is less then what you believe the car is worth. If it were my car I would hang on to it, but if you still think that you must sell it, be patient. On the rare occasion I sell a car, it is to the person whom I choose for the car. The bottom line is not why I got into the hobby, and I'm not going to change now. I trust that you will know the right person when he comes calling.

 

Bill

I don't know what the car is worth on today's market.  It was 40, then 42 then 45K.  But apparently now its worth about $15 from what you all say.  So far not a single soul has ever made me an offer.  Yes, it is with a dealer and that adds money.  I'm hoping to find somebody like the dealers apparently always find who pay way more than anybody will pay to the owner themselves.  If it doesn't sell, and I get past my various illnesses (maybe not too far in the future) I'll bring it home and put in back in my garage.  Then I'll advertise it again, for what?  Best offer?  Before passing a dealer friend of mine sold a junk 1939 Buick Special sedan with a new paint job for $15,000.  Apparently most people here don't think a older prize winning convertible sedan is worth anymore than that.  Right?

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3 hours ago, 1912Staver said:

 

I think there are many of us who think your car is very nice. But few of us are able to afford a car in your price range.  I am more or less forever stuck in the $10,000 - $12, 000 price range, and I had a decent middle class job up to my retirement.  In aggregate I have of course spent at least double the value of your car within the hobby. However that was spread out over the 40 + years I have been involved. At no single  point did I have anywhere near that much money at my disposal, and I would never borrow that heavily on a want.  And I suspect my situation is more common than many think.

 I have always looked at my car hobby spending as old car university tuition. Unfortunately just as I received my degree I had to retire.

 Yes, there are many people more affluent within the hobby.  But I get the feeling they are after bigger fish than your Buick.

I think you are probably in the unenviable situation of where most people attracted to your car simply can't afford it.

 

Greg in Canada

You started too late I guess.  In 1970 I bought this car the first time for $1700.  The second time I bought back I spent over 15 times that much for it, but my Dad had passed away and left me that money.  Since that time I always felt I'd keep it until I thought the Grim Reaper might soon be knocking at the door.  It's not that I want to sell it.  I currently live in the old car end of the world in Florida, nothing to do with it except when I go to church.  It isn't a Classic car like my '41 Roadmaster, so it really isn't welcome at their events.  BCA events are mostly Sunday lunches and they are 90 miles away.  The only viable AACA club is in Miami and that is 155 miles away.  My other '39, which was my high school car and my '41 fill the usefulness bill here.  We have a 90 Park Avenue with only 3,600 miles on it, and it fills the bill for long distance from here AACA tours.  I took this car to AACA Sentimental Tours in NC and Texas, but in a closed trailer.  I want to either get out of  trailer hauling or buy an open trailer to haul my two closed sedans.  So, there you are.  My long awaited retirement extra security is suddenly no longer desirable and valuable like it used to me.  That's my story, always a day late and a dollar short.

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13 minutes ago, Dynaflash8 said:

 

I don't know what the car is worth on today's market.  It was 40, then 42 then 45K.  But apparently now its worth about $15 from what you all say.  So far not a single soul has ever made me an offer.  Yes, it is with a dealer and that adds money.  I'm hoping to find somebody like the dealers apparently always find who pay way more than anybody will pay to the owner themselves.  If it doesn't sell, and I get past my various illnesses (maybe not too far in the future) I'll bring it home and put in back in my garage.  Then I'll advertise it again, for what?  Best offer?  Before passing a dealer friend of mine sold a junk 1939 Buick Special sedan with a new paint job for $15,000.  Apparently most people here don't think a older prize winning convertible sedan is worth anymore than that.  Right?

     If anyone thinks your amazing convertible sedan is only worth 15k, they know nothing about old cars and should not be posting nonsense. Even if someone says it's worth only 15k, ask if he will produce the money right now, chances are he will not. This is one of the reasons I dislike selling cars although I must. People talk the talk but when it comes time to deal, they just keep on talking until they walk. You already know that my friend. Come on. 

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