Dynaflash8

Is hobby interest in pre-WWII cars Dying?

Recommended Posts

4 hours ago, mercer09 said:

Well your car is fantastic. I love 39s and yours is as rare as you say.

I have seen it listed on ebay with an opening bid of 30k, but not meeting reserve. Not how I list cars..............

makes it very hard for a person to make a bid.

 

I understand you dont want to go through all of the small things Matt mentioned, but I have to totally agree with him. Matt is a good bit younger and has a feel for the mkt. While I think the skirts are interesting, I agree they are a turnoff.

I also agree with his statement to remove the fog lights. Some small things need to be done and then relisted. Perhaps list it on ebay for 1.00. yes have a reserve, but then you can see what the mkt is really trying to tell you.

Auctions dont work well when they are started with too high of a ceiling price.

 

Regarding millennial, they are not your target market. They are interested in far newer cars and very few have strong disposable income. Your mkt should be a guy between 40-60 yrs of age.

I know this is MY opinion. FYI I am 59 years old and the exception- I love brass cars!!!!!!!

It is on the MJC Classic Cars website. Call they guy and start to negotiate.  I am not in concrete but I'm not going to give it away.  I've already answered the Trippe Light, skirt and wheel color questions.  Repaint the wheels and sell the lights and skirts for big money; or, I'll knock off $1,000 of my bottom price to keep the lights.  Heck, I'll knock off another $600 and keep the skirts, but you'd have to paint the rear fenders.  That said, paint comes with the car.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, 1912Staver said:

From what I have seen there are plenty of old car video's on YouTube and has been for some time. The drifting and Australian style burnout videos seem to be a lot more popular.

 

Greg

 

So is searching Youtube part of your avoidance of social media? Candidly, you don't seem to know what social is and how it works. You just know that you shouldn't like it for some reason.

 

10 minutes ago, 1937hd45 said:

THANK YOU! The hobby will be fine without the iPhone people. Bob 

 

Really? Did you see the first post in this thread?

 

 

 

I'm not in this thread to pick arguments, honest. This topic of how to get people in the hobby is a constant on this forum. And for the most part, it's old guys proposing old-guy ways of attracting young people. It's not going to work folks. It's only going to alienate people on the cusp of getting involved. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

so bottom line Dynaflash is,

 

you really dont want to hear peoples advice. Your mind is made up. so you should keep on doing what you are doing..........

 

not trying to be rude here, just stating the truth.

 

you asked and the "people" have spoken.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Gunsmoke said:

Very nice car. Personally I would not change anything on the car, any interested buyer knows the fog lights, skirts and spot light are accessories which can be deleted if so desired, and repainting a set of wheerls is cheap. While a Phaeton is normally a very desireable model, this year was not Buick's best style, the rather odd nose and visually under-sized grill being it's main detraction. Indeed cars of most makes 1938-1948 suffered from styling challenges as the industry transitioned between full fendered cars of the early 30's to the bathtubs of the late 40's. I agree with others that your market audience for this car is smaller than for some other cars (2 doors, convertibles, other years/makes, drivers versus show cars, etc) so that needs to be reflected in price. Matt Harwood seems to have a sound reputation at moving quality cars, perhaps contact him privately for an opinion. 

Gunsmoke:  It is what it is.  I can probably get the dealer to remove the lights and give them back to me.  Matt suggested that.  The dealer wanted it this way.  I've been sick, and still am, so I can't go up there and them right now.  The spotlight is factory Unity light.  GM used Uniity until about 1941 when they went to the house brand.  Wheels aren't cheap if you stripe them.  I found that out when I recently restored my '41 Roadmaster.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Dynaflash8 said:

It is on the MJC Classic Cars website. Call they guy and start to negotiate.  I am not in concrete but I'm not going to give it away.  I've already answered the Trippe Light, skirt and wheel color questions.  Repaint the wheels and sell the lights and skirts for big money; or, I'll knock off $1,000 of my bottom price to keep the lights.  Heck, I'll knock off another $600 and keep the skirts, but you'd have to paint the rear fenders.  That said, paint comes with the car.

 

Take pictures with the skirts off so potential buyers car see it that way. Then paint the wheels with Plasti Dip. It's cheap and totally, easily reversible if someone wants to return to original. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, alsancle said:

The market is shrinking but that car should find a buyer.  I'm gonna guess price,  followed by colors are making it harder to sell a car.   I sold two cars last year.  One was more desirable but an older restoration,  that took 4 months.   One was less desirable but pristine,  that took 3 weeks.

Alsankle: You are certainly correct.  I sold what I felt was a lousy sixties car last year in about 4 weeks.  For those who want a driver, this car is a driver, and a good driver that still looks good.  Remember its an old restoration, not some trailer queen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Dynaflash8 said:

It is on the MJC Classic Cars website. Call they guy and start to negotiate.  

 

I have always bought cars from private owners.

Jay Leno has said he avoids dealers and auctions, too,

and he clearly has a huge amount of experience in the hobby.

Dealers I hope love cars and love this hobby, and the

dealer you selected is probably a fine person, but I

would MUCH rather buy from a knowledgeable long-time

owner such as Earl.  Dealers keep high asking prices, and

hold onto them like grim death.

 

In contrast, a devoted private owner can tell me all about the

car from his experiences over many years;  I can assess him

and judge his forthrightness.  (And Earl, as a past AACA President,

has a fine reputation!)  Why might I spend an extra $10,000 for a 

dealer's mark-up?

 

If you sell the car yourself, Earl, you can immediately reduce

the asking price without reducing the amount you receive.

I liked the green 1939 Buick Special convertible (?) which

I believe you sold, but I think you sold that through a dealer too.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Once again,  Youtube is probably technically social media. So I was wrong in stating I am social media free.  And even if I watched a lot of YouTube how would that translate into "social media presence" ?  One would have to be a frequent Youtube poster to benefit from your adoption program ? That sounds quite discriminatory, and even a bit elitist, not really the spirit of the AACA.

  If there is a AACA involved program such as you suggest should not all old car fans be possible participants ? Would younger social media stars be means tested ? Or would the program be limited only to young, social media savvy , disadvantaged potential old car hobbyist's. What about us middle age impecunious old car hobbyists ? is the AACA going to adopt an ageist policy ?

 

Greg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You would have to be pretty mechanically shallow to not know the skirts and lights are removable. I seriously doubt a thousand dollar reduction in price is going to bring forth a rush of bidders. I personally prefer a 37 or 38 but this car is beautiful just the way it sits. I would love to own this Buick but it is out of my price range.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just my observation from being in the used car market for most of my life.  Most byers wanted to make their cars over to what they thought looked good . So every used car we . Put on the lot had the fog lights removed along with the after market sound system rubber band tires rear deck mounted spoiler under car lighting musical horns . Then they would buy it and put a lot of the same things on the car   and then would say  my car the beauty is in the eyes of the beholder. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, John_Mereness said:

I always hear that convertible sedans are tough sells - until someone buys one and then they swear by them forever as they are pretty ideal convertibles - everyone gets to sit comfortably inside and top goes down. 

In my day, the convertible sedan was far more desirable than a convertible coupe because it was a step above the coupe when new and far more rare.  By the way, the car isn't' simply yellow.  It is factory Sequoia Cream, a color originally only available on convertible Buick models.  As to the styling, beauty is all in the beholder.  I, personally, think the car is beautiful.  I've thought that of all 1939 Special and Century cars since I was 3 or 4 years old.  I've owned over a dozen of them.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
41 minutes ago, mercer09 said:

so bottom line Dynaflash is,

 

you really dont want to hear peoples advice. Your mind is made up. so you should keep on doing what you are doing..........

 

not trying to be rude here, just stating the truth.

 

you asked and the "people" have spoken.

No, not at all.  The question is, is there no or a lot less interest in Pre-War cars now than there used to be?  I saw a poor example of a car like mine go for $50,000 at an auction in Fort Lauderdale a couple of  years ago.  Heck, I'll keep the skirts and the Tripp lights if the buyer doesn't want them.  That's not a big deal to me, but I'm not going to take the skirts off before I see some green for the car.  I'm letting go, but I'm letting go of what I have, as is, where is with me making physical changes to please somebody else.  Want to change something, change it.  By the way, I saw you had a '33 Plymouth I think.  Did you used to live in Baltimore but moved to California?

Edited by Dynaflash8 (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, 1912Staver said:

Once again,  Youtube is probably technically social media. So I was wrong in stating I am social media free.  And even if I watched a lot of YouTube how would that translate into "social media presence" ?  One would have to be a frequent Youtube poster to benefit from your adoption program ? That sounds quite discriminatory, and even a bit elitist, not really the spirit of the AACA.

  If there is a AACA involved program such as you suggest should not all old car fans be possible participants ? Would younger social media stars be means tested ? Or would the program be limited only to young, social media savvy , disadvantaged potential old car hobbyist's. What about us middle age impecunious old car hobbyists ? is the AACA going to adopt an ageist policy ?

 

Greg

 

I get it, you don't like social media even though you don't understand it. Please feel free to offer a better solution then mine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Dynaflash8 said:

In my day, the convertible sedan was far more desirable than a convertible coupe because it was a step above the coupe when new and far more rare.  By the way, the car isn't' simply yellow.  It is factory Sequoia Cream, a color originally only available on convertible Buick models.  As to the styling, beauty is all in the beholder.  I, personally, think the car is beautiful.  I've thought that of all 1939 Special and Century cars since I was 3 or 4 years old.  I've owned over a dozen of them.

There is little debate that your car is a beauty, the difficulty is now finding a buyer with sufficient funds and interest in this model to become its next owner.  In the marketplace it will take every available tool to find that person.  Yes, even that evil social media has to be considered as just another way to find the buyer who wants this particular car.  At some point you as the seller will have to decide at what price point you want to make the change of ownership.  I doubt you will have to be afraid that if you sell it for X dollars the new owner will flip it for significantly more money.  Instead, what you want to find is the next caretaker of your pride and joy who will appreciate it as much as you did.  The knowledge it has a good home can be worth more personally than having $2k more in your pocket.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

 

I have always bought cars from private owners.

Jay Leno has said he avoids dealers and auctions, too,

and he clearly has a huge amount of experience in the hobby.

Dealers I hope love cars and love this hobby, and the

dealer you selected is probably a fine person, but I

would MUCH rather buy from a knowledgeable long-time

owner such as Earl.  Dealers keep high asking prices, and

hold onto them like grim death.

 

In contrast, a devoted private owner can tell me all about the

car from his experiences over many years;  I can assess him

and judge his forthrightness.  (And Earl, as a past AACA President,

has a fine reputation!)  Why might I spend an extra $10,000 for a 

dealer's mark-up?

 

If you sell the car yourself, Earl, you can immediately reduce

the asking price without reducing the amount you receive.

I liked the green 1939 Buick Special convertible (?) which

I believe you sold, but I think you sold that through a dealer too.

The dealer is flexible.  He is representing me.  He lowered the price $10,000 a couple of weeks ago and I lowered by bottom price accordingly.  When you get 80, and not maybe too well, you'll see why you don't want to be dealing with buyers yourself.  Of course if somebody really comes to you and wants the car that is different.  I sold our 1971 Rivera to a man who came to me, sent a friend to look at and drive it, and sent me the money.  It was no hassle.  That car wasn't' really for sale at the time, but one doesn't look a gift horse in the mouth.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There was a fellow on here with a late 20's or early 30"s Studebaker President and I highly suggested he make some changes to his car to get the money he wanted (and it was a very recent AACA winning car too).  It needed some attention spent to jazz up its "indelibly base model Plain Jane looks"  and not really having its final details done - ex it needed pinstripping on body and wheels).  He made the changes, but really did not "remarket' the car and I think that hurt him as once the changes were done the car was so much better looking yet new photos were tagged on the back of the old ones, plus the "topic" had everyone's discussion points.  

 

Most of us know how to take off skirts, change lights, and repaint wheels all be it if that is the look you must have it is far from "pocket change" to do (when you take the trippe lights off you have to repaint the bumper bars for a solid couple 100 dollars, if you take the skirts off and have to repaint the back fenders it is a solid couple of thousand, and it change wheel color and re-pinstripe wheels it is a couple thousand more).   I think when you see these kind of reply it is often in a response to how you get the car up to the asking price. 

 

That being said, I do not think there is any issue here other than possibly price and the initial price possibly being at a level that discourages the early responding crowd from asking about a lower price.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, Mike36 said:

You would have to be pretty mechanically shallow to not know the skirts and lights are removable. I seriously doubt a thousand dollar reduction in price is going to bring forth a rush of bidders. I personally prefer a 37 or 38 but this car is beautiful just the way it sits. I would love to own this Buick but it is out of my price range.

Try and you might be surprised unless it is way out of your price range.  My Daddy always said, "nothing beats a try but a failure."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think young people would be interested in pre WWII cars but they cant afford them. I think theres going to be a correction coming sometime and the cars will be worth alot less. All of them. Most of the people here me included grew up in a time when your father working was enough to have a house and a nice life. Today alot of familys need two workers just to make ends meet. That doesnt leave room for expensive toys. For many familys like my daugher even a $20,000 hobby car would be unthinkable today. They both have good jobs and two kids but they just barely make ends meet. They drive inexpensive cars and pay mortgage payments on a regular house. Their in they're 30s but they are happy if they can put a few dollars into they're retirement each month. My son in law Kurt would love to have that Buick but he knows he will never be able to afford it. They arent stupid with they're money they just have less of it to spread around than most of us did.

 

It is easy for us who grew up and lived in a different time to think that young people are different today. Their not. The world has changed and even two good jobs dont feed a family as good as one good job did a generation or two ago. So many older people just look down on them like their lazy and if they would just work harder they could have nice things. I use to think that too. Now I know its just not true. Everything else is different for them and owning even one hobby car is a dream that probably stays a dream. 

 

Dont look down on young people. They want what you want and what you have. They just cant afford it and probly never will. That will cause a big shift in the hobby because cars that older rich people dont want will loose all they're value in the coming years beacuse there will be no buyers at the high prices. At low prices people like Kurt will buy them and love them but they cant do that until they can afford them. Their's a change coming and it will be financial.

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 1
  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another thing that I think is holding the car back is where it's located. Getting a car from central Florida is a long tow for most people.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am kind of in the middle of the age group of those that interested in pre-war cars.

Not quite in my 60's I have been around pre-war cars my entire life and my interests lie in the very late teens through mid 30's.

 

The late 30's early 40's cars always seemed to have a much smaller following unless the car was a prestige marque.

 

Your Buick is a great looking car and it is no doubt fairly rare but as been discussed many times, rarity does not always translate into being valuable or desirable.

 

Good luck with the sale, I hope your car finds a buyer that will cherish and enjoy it and that you get what you feel is a fair price.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, TerryB said:

There is little debate that your car is a beauty, the difficulty is now finding a buyer with sufficient funds and interest in this model to become its next owner.  In the marketplace it will take every available tool to find that person.  Yes, even that evil social media has to be considered as just another way to find the buyer who wants this particular car.  At some point you as the seller will have to decide at what price point you want to make the change of ownership.  I doubt you will have to be afraid that if you sell it for X dollars the new owner will flip it for significantly more money.  Instead, what you want to find is the next caretaker of your pride and joy who will appreciate it as much as you did.  The knowledge it has a good home can be worth more personally than having $2k more in your pocket.

Terry, we've been friends for 50+ years I think.  I don't care if the buyer makes money, changes the car any, or even if it goes overseas.  I used to have all those kinds of preferences.  The only think I care about now is 1) not being skinned as my daughters would be if we own the car when my wife or I am gone, 2) and selling it in time to invest a reasonable amount of money toward the possible eventual cost of care, nursing or otherwise. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There will be a buyer for every car, given the price is right. That price is probably not in sync with what you think is right. The cars will not simply disappear.

Another problem with selling cars these days is that while the number of buyers may not be shrinking -- in fact the number of buyers may be increasing -- but the buyers out there today may be less interested in having a collection. So, for every Earl out there, there is an enthusiast to replace him. However, Earl collects five or more cars, while his replacemet(s) only collects one or two. Therefore, prices drop, and may drop considerably, until that replacement decides that he can afford to collect five or more cars given the lower prices.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, billorn said:

I think young people would be interested in pre WWII cars but they cant afford them. I think theres going to be a correction coming sometime and the cars will be worth alot less. All of them. Most of the people here me included grew up in a time when your father working was enough to have a house and a nice life. Today alot of familys need two workers just to make ends meet. That doesnt leave room for expensive toys. For many familys like my daugher even a $20,000 hobby car would be unthinkable today. They both have good jobs and two kids but they just barely make ends meet. They drive inexpensive cars and pay mortgage payments on a regular house. Their in they're 30s but they are happy if they can put a few dollars into they're retirement each month. My son in law Kurt would love to have that Buick but he knows he will never be able to afford it. They arent stupid with they're money they just have less of it to spread around than most of us did.

 

It is easy for us who grew up and lived in a different time to think that young people are different today. Their not. The world has changed and even two good jobs dont feed a family as good as one good job did a generation or two ago. So many older people just look down on them like their lazy and if they would just work harder they could have nice things. I use to think that too. Now I know its just not true. Everything else is different for them and owning even one hobby car is a dream that probably stays a dream. 

 

Dont look down on young people. They want what you want and what you have. They just cant afford it and probly never will. That will cause a big shift in the hobby because cars that older rich people dont want will loose all they're value in the coming years beacuse there will be no buyers at the high prices. At low prices people like Kurt will buy them and love them but they cant do that until they can afford them. Their's a change coming and it will be financial.

 

I have to disagree with your point. There are more auctions then ever and when you go to them, there is no shortage of buyers. The dip in interest in Prewar cars is a matter of taste. I was at the Auburn auction two years ago and saw a great illustration of this. At Auburn, they have two blocks running simultaneously. At one point in time, there was a pristine 41 Buick Special Phaeton and a 1998 Toyota Supra up for bid. The Buick stalled in the high $30Ks while the Supra was in the $80k range. There was no shortage of money in the room, only a lack of Prewar interest.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
55 minutes ago, Buick64C said:

 

Take pictures with the skirts off so potential buyers car see it that way. Then paint the wheels with Plasti Dip. It's cheap and totally, easily reversible if someone wants to return to original. 

Look at the picture of my blue sedan that comes with my post and you can see what you are asking to see.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, Dynaflash8 said:

 By the way, he advertises on eBay to get people to call. He doesn't expect to sell his cars on eBay.

ebay is a great marketing tool - it has a great reach (all be much less than it use to as far fewer really quality pre-war cars appear than in past years).

 

Sidenote: a dealer will often leave on through close too many bidders use  programs/platforms (ex. Bidknapper) and come in at the last second - that just may be your buyer but then again it may not.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...