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ANTIQUE CAR ADS $3 and $5


PCMH
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Mr. PCMH, I'm sure you appreciate old cars

and their histories as we all do.  Old advertisements

can be very interesting!

 

However, whenever anyone cuts out a few pages

of ads from an 80- or 100-year-old magazine, the

magazine itself is ruined in the process.  That issue

managed to survive for almost a century until some

modern owner decided to destroy it.  Consider

keeping some of your old magazines together, uncut,

because there are a lot of interesting articles and 

other content that should be preserved for history's sake.

 

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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2 hours ago, JV Puleo said:

In the book trade it's called "savaging."

If nobody will buy a magazine for $10.00 PLUS the postage cost, I think the selling of adds for $7.00 plus $3.00 for postage is the better business deal. Bob 

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I don't see it as a matter of money - it's a matter of right and wrong. If cutting up old cars because the bodies are more valuable as hotrods is wrong, cutting anything up to make a bit more money is wrong. We have the same problem with antique machinery and the (likely short lived) fad of making tables out of the legs. Many historically significant machines have been scrapped to make dining room tables for fashionable "upscale" yuppies. Magazines and books are no different. I personally know of several very desirable 16th and 17th and 18th century books that have suffered this fate because the illustrations (engravings and woodcuts) are more valuable to "decorators" that the books are to scholars. But, no matter how you slice it, it's anti-historical.

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4 hours ago, 1937hd45 said:

So, you wouldn't buy a 1908 issue of County Life in America for the landscaping feature because the Maxwell ad was missing? 

 

Actually, I would not buy a damaged magazine;

I'd buy one that was in excellent condition and intact.

A car with missing parts is harder to sell, and a

magazine with missing pages is worth less or worthless,

and I suspect is scrapped.

 

And I've bought many old magazines.  I have reprinted

historical articles in our regional AACA newsletter for 

the insights they provide--such as Thomas Edison's views

in 1895 of the coming electric cars.  Some mainstream

magazines, such as the 1908 you mention, can be very

interesting:  Occasionally they have articles on the new

automobile experience, and they give great insights that

most people today never knew.

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Just now, John_S_in_Penna said:

 

Actually, I would not buy a damaged magazine;

I'd buy one that was in excellent condition and intact.

A car with missing parts is harder to sell, and a

magazine with missing pages is worth less or worthless,

and I suspect is scrapped.

 

And I've bought many old magazines.  I have reprinted

historical articles in our regional AACA newsletter for 

the insights they provide--such as Thomas Edison's views

in 1895 of the coming electric cars.  Some mainstream

magazines, such as the 1908 you mention, can be very

interesting:  Occasionally they have articles on the new

automobile experience, and they give great insights that

most people today never knew.

That is why I cut them out and save them for my personal reference collection and sell off the DeLava cream separator ads, and other collectable ads. Win win 

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I have what I feel to be a great of collection of Hupmobile ads from when I was a 1935 518D owner and editor of the club magazine. Sure they were removed from a magazine by someone at one time, but the time spent enjoying the artwork and reading the copy creates a wonderful snapshot of another era or eras. The magazines themselves? Well, having ads removed and saved for collections like mine (of ANY ad, auto or not) saves the ad, creates a bit of income,  and displays them to folks who would otherwise never see them. They came from what was most likely something headed to the trash. Old magazines really aren't that rare and saving portions of them is fine with me. A lot fewer cars (or equipment, or furniture, or...) were built than were magazines printed!

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I'm suppose to be getting a couple hundred 30's car ads in soon in a lot of brochures i acquired.  I haven't seen them yet.  I might save a few for my self but will most likely have quite a surplus.  Maybe I shoudl just wallpaper a wall on the garage with them.  I don't think they sell well enough to mess with when nice whole brochures struggle to bring $10. 

I'll post here when they come in.  I most likely will gift off a bunch. 

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  • 1 month later...

Well, I hope your sales are hot;  but please,

for the future, think seriously about our point that

destroying antique magazines hurts history.

 

I've been glad to have entire magazines to 

get a glimpse of history.  Sometimes, I have

simply put a marker in the whole magazine to

indicate where an interesting ad is located.

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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Tough call to make regarding magazines. Certain magazines that were popular with the general public saw the car manufacturers advertise heavily in them because they knew they had a potential audience for their product. Many magazines saw thousands  of issues printed : National Geographic, Saturday Evening Post, Literary Digest  and some magazines with coated paper stock (pages -  ie it was glossy rather then a matte dull finish) like Fortune magazine have magnificent graphics and can survive better then those magazines that have lesser quality paper.

My own feeling is I like to see original material stay in tact , BUT , can well understand to try to store a complete magazine for one page that has an advertisement of a favorite car you own or would like to own does have its space limitations. Some collectors want to possess every scrap of paper, catalog, advertisement ever made for a particular car or series/model of cars . I have found this especially true of owners of Model A Fords. They ( we)  want the original material but don't have the room to store it all so just seek the single page or piece.

Some collectors even cut up car magazines just to get a particular ad but have no interest in the rest of the content - I am thinking pre WWII era automotive magazines here.  If I see a magazine ad I find interesting, I try to look at the page number if it has one and the name and date of that particular issue so I can then ask people who deal in that for that particular page rather then try to find the whole magazine and remove the page. This will take patience and perhaps a lot of time. There are some people/collectors who don't have the patience and "want it now" all for their own reasons - just to have that particular page for its image and information , but more often then not because it gives them a "one upmanship" over their fellow collector who seeks the same and it also gives them bragging rights that "they have it and you don't".

My own call over the decades has been to seek an ad from a dealer who has the single sheet, if I find and intact magazine that is in fragile condition due to age ( exposure to light and heat takes its toll) and is falling apart or about to I have no qualms about taking the single page as it most likely is falling out already anyway. Cutting up an annual show issue of a motor car magazine just to get the ad because it is introducing the new model for that year I won't do, but know that there are collectors that will.

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I have bought old car magazines online, but only if it features a particular model I have interest in.

 

I also still have just a few of the Car and Driver I had since new, of the late 1970's and very early 1980's vintage. I got rid of the Car Craft and Motorcycle magazines I had back in my late teens, but wished I'd kept them now.

 

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