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1913 Automatic Tire Pump Hose needed


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My 1913 Cole has a Taylor Noil Automatic Tire Pump that is powered off of the engine.  The pump does put out air when it is engaged and now I need a hose for it.  What would be the correct Tire pump hose from 1913?  Also the hose would need to be much longer than a standard tire pump as it was meant to run from the engine compartment to each tire.   Any ideas on where I would get a proper hose like this?

 

thanks in advance.

Edited by kfle (see edit history)
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Hoses of the era were probably covered with a cloth fabric, whereas today's hoses have a rubber or neoprene surface.   Some Model A Ford parts suppliers offer a tire pump hose with a simulated surface meant to look like cloth covering.  That is probably as close a substitute as could be found.  Try to locate the source of this type hose to obtain the length you need. 

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The pre 1925 hoses I have seen that were original were red rubber except a Cadillac hose that was black. The Caddy hose had a built in guage in the hose. I suspect that today you won’t have much choice as to color and size, the early hoses I have seen were very skinny.......IE small diameter. Google Kellog air pump in the images category. 

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The factory drawings for the Kellogg pump hoses used on Franklins specify they must be able to withstand 80 lbs pressure. But it doesn't say what the hose is made of since it was purchased as a complete part from Kellogg, with the gauge attached near the locking-lever type air chuck,  like Ed mentioned.

 

I'm not sure plain rubber hose of the day would stand up to that much pressure for long.   I would think it is the same reinforced hose seen on some high pressure hand tire pumps of that era.  I used old compressor air hose that has a woven fabric covering. Not sure what the original was like, but since no one seems to have an original it has the look of what one might suspect of that era and it is certainly strong enough.

 

One possibility is to use modern fuel line, which is reinforced to take that much pressure. Then send it to Rhode Island Wire Service to have them cover it with black fabric loom like their wring harnesses. Then you only have to duplicate the crimp ferrules on the ends.  

 

Paul   

Edited by PFitz (see edit history)
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You can also buy a heat shrink tubing with a textured exterior. We used it to cover some large non removable wires on a 1918 electric we are restoring and it looks pretty convincing. From McMaster-Carr if I remember correctly.

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I know I have seen a couple. One in a Packard was cloth covered with a pattern in the cloth, black with a red and white pattern. Another with a Cadillac it was a simple black cloth covered hose. Both were coiled up under the front seats.

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25 minutes ago, Brass is Best said:

I know I have seen a couple. One in a Packard was cloth covered with a pattern in the cloth, black with a red and white pattern. Another with a Cadillac it was a simple black cloth covered hose. Both were coiled up under the front seats.

Like this one?  It may be for sale for the right price....

IMG_20190509_074104972.jpg

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9 minutes ago, Mark Shaw said:

Like this one?  It may be for sale for the right price....

IMG_20190509_074104972.jpg

Except for that gauge, that is exactly like the hose I have. I think mine was made to fill the tires by attaching one end to a spark plug hole.

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Thanks for the information and the updates on the type of hose.  I don't have an actual picture handy, but here is a drawing of the tire pump.  As you can see at the top the tire pump, is where you hook up the hose and it doesn't use any type of connector like the one shown on the hose in a previous post.  The hose really just slides over the ribbed connection point so finding the right diameter hose will be important.  The hose was then stored under the front seat in a nice wooden pull out drawer that is there for the tire pump hose and tools.  

 

image.thumb.png.a2d034ba4f841f2ae1384a1de7af1e2e.png

Edited by kfle (see edit history)
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A similar fabric wrapped hose is used in the world of airbrushes, but might be too small a diameter.  Worth looking on eBay to see what's out there even if undersized.  Maybe the same sources can provide larger hose.

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2 hours ago, Mark Shaw said:

Like this one?  It may be for sale for the right price....

IMG_20190509_074104972.jpg

 

These kits were marketed by Schrader , possibly as late as the 1960's. Not 100 % correct for a teens car, however a very practical solution. I bought my kit, N.O.S. at a swap meet {Portland ?} for a reasonable price.

 

Greg in Canada

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Aeroquip 303 hose is probably your best bet for something of modern quality with the cloth outer appearance.  Available at aircraft supply shops like aircraft spruce.  Not sure if it has ink stamping along the hose, might want to ask the vendor, it would be nice to have an unmarked hose for your project.

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strictly speaking, "hose" is reinforced, "tubing" is not.  Black vs red is the type of filler used, as most rubber types are off-white.  I think the advice above to use 80 psi-rated air hose, with a cosmetic cover if necessary, is good.  i don't think air brush hoses handle that high a pressure.

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55 minutes ago, Mark Shaw said:

The one in the photo above was not made by Schrader.  The wrench is also marked ENGINAIR.

 

IMG_20190509_141835623.jpg

 

 

Yes, not surprising.  I am sure there were several similar offerings by various makers. Most I have seen are Schrader , and I jumped to the conclusion yours was as well.

 

Greg

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23 hours ago, Mark Shaw said:

The one in the photo above was not made by Schrader.  The wrench is also marked ENGINAIR.

 

IMG_20190509_141835623.jpg

This Enginair Service Set came with adapters to fit various size spark plugs.  It is a clever device which incorporates an air exchanger so that fresh air rather than cylinder air which could have oil or other contamination is dispensed.
A second one also by by G. H. Meisner & Co. has Ford script on the dial, but says Enginair Tire Pump on the wrench.

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Edited by Dave Henderson (see edit history)
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  • 1 year later...
On 5/8/2019 at 10:21 PM, kfle said:

My 1913 Cole has a Taylor Noil Automatic Tire Pump that is powered off of the engine.  The pump does put out air when it is engaged and now I need a hose for it.  What would be the correct Tire pump hose from 1913?  Also the hose would need to be much longer than a standard tire pump as it was meant to run from the engine compartment to each tire.   Any ideas on where I would get a proper hose like this?

 

thanks in advance.

Hi Keven, do you have a clear picture of the actual Taylor pump install in your 1913 Cole? I have a similar pump and hose, but I think I have different hose's connector on mine; Cheers...!!

IMG_2168.JPG

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  When I was growing up, we used those “ chuffers” all over the farm. Believe it or not, people actually compounded those devices ( simple plumbing) and spray painted with them. I had a friend that painted his ‘47 Chevy while running the engine with two spark plugs out and two chuffers screwed in supplying about a 10 gallon tank. 

   Nice paint job for the day. (about 1955).

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