Pugdog1

Rebuilding a wheel cylinder-1936 Buick

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Good afternoon Everyone

 

I am dealing with a leaking wheel cylinder on a 1936 Buick, and am looking to have it rebuilt. 

 

Can anyone recommend a good rebuilder?

 

Thank you

Dan

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Hello I have always been able to find new wheel or master cylinder for replacement so I have never had any relined .You could check Hemmings or the Buick Bugle,White Post Restoration advertised for years that they did this type of work, sorry I can’t recommend anyone directly for relining .Gary

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Kaarps will resleeve the cylinder with stainless steel  it for about $80 and it will be better than new

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Hagen's Auto Parts

 

https://hagensautoparts.com/buick/9-brake/349

 

They sleeve them with stainless. I had them do my Graham wheel cylinders.

 

I never see them recommended on this forum, but my dealings with them have been fine.👍 They are only completely across the USA from me!

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Resleeving is always nice if you have pitting.  Some resleeve in stainless, others in brass.  You won't put enough miles on it to matter which one you use.  With smooth walls and new seals, the cylinders will be in good shape.  Consider using DOT 5 silicone brake fluid.  It does not adsorb water.  I have had DOT 5 in my Jaguar for 25 years.  With DOT 5 you will not have any rust issues.     Hugh

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I have had trouble with DOT 5 in brake systems with British rubber. The seals became swollen and jammed things up. That was a few years ago. Haave things improved?

Lately, I was warned against using DOT 5 in Dunlop brakes by the supplier.

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"Rubber" is a very generic term.  "Elastomers" gets closer to being correct, and then the myriad of EPDM, EPR, Viton, Nitril, Buna, etc.  I personally would not buy NOS rubber components.  There is a shelf life and the materials and formulations are controlled so much better in manufacturing these days.  Years ago the European cars were on Dot 4 because US Dot 3 would cause seal swelling.  

I like to minimize my maintenance.  New seals and DOT 5 and that should be the end of brake fluid changes.  

Used to be you could put the seals or O rings in the fluid, and If it did not swell in a day or 2 it was good.    

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I agree with Hubert ,rubber items deteriorated just with age ,new fresh rubber items ,if available ,are the way to go. The brake hoses can be made , Some of the NAPA stores can do this using old ones for patterns. I once replaced a flexible fuel line on my 52 Plymouth that was a new old stock, leaked worst that the one I took off!!Changed to silicon dot 5 on my 49 Buick when rebuild the brakes with no problems that was about 3 years ago.

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When I rebuilt the brakes of both my 1938 Special and my 1965 Mustang I used DOT5 silicone fluid and never had any problems. I did the Buick 15 years ago and have not had to change the fluid even once, and the fluid remains clear.  I have only topped it up perhaps an ounce or so over that period. The Mustang fluid is just as good after 10 years. The key is to change all the rubber parts and rebuild or replace the wheel cylinders and master cylinder. I also replaced the steel lines on the Buick and flushed the steel lines on the Mustang with denatured alcohol. I do notice that the fluid gradually looses its purple color over time and turns clear but with no apparent change in properties.

 

DOT5 will work fine on drum or disc brakes but not with ABS as it is more compressible than standard DOT3/4.  It should also not be used for cars that are raced or tracked and cannot ever be mixed with standard fluid.

 

Steve D 

   

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I nthink we all know what we mean when we say "rubber". Go into a parts store and ask for EPDM compojnents and they bwouldnt have a clue.

 

Just like facuial tissue is called "Kleenex".

 

It is foolish to buy any NOS "elastomeri"  products. The "O" is to dicy.

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On ‎5‎/‎12‎/‎2019 at 3:04 PM, DonMicheletti said:

Kaarps will resleeve the cylinder with stainless steel  it for about $80 and it will be better than new

X2 on Ron Kaarps in California !!!

Had my "40 LTD done about 4 years ago in 304 stainless @ about 70 for the wheels and 80 for the master.

Use regular brake fluid and she stops on a dime.

 

I even drove out to visit w/ Ron (just west of Ontario, Ca.) and at that time his son was next door doing power brake rebuilding.

 

Mike in Colorado

 

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