TVtommy

F150XL 5.0 towing....thoughts?

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Hello, and thanks reading....

 

Is anyone towing open carriers with an F150 5.0L?

 

If so, how is it working for you?

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A few questions.  Does the truck have trailer towing package and what is the weight of the car that you are towing.  Also does the trailer have brakes on both axles and you have a good  brake controller in the truck. Are you going to be using an equalizer hitch and how much trailer towing experience do you have towing the load that you plan on towing.  Where are you towing, in the flat lands or in the mountains?

 

If you have all of the brake/safety equipment and a trailer towing package on the truck and do not drive it like a sports car and not towing a 4,500 pound vehicle, you should be fine.  Any one of the above missing, could be a problem and not safe.  IMO

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Larry is exactly ON TARGET-

 

Great advice, 

your open trailer, if good solid construction, could easily be 2,000 lbs by itself. hen add the weight of the towed vehicle, additional equipment, tools, etc.

 

BE CERTAIN that your trailer tires are not aged - FIVE (5) years shold be considered TOO OLD !! IN MY OPINION

 

Carry more than one spare trailer tire - 2 should be minimum because often when one loses a belt it will take out tho other one on that side, and you don't want to be searching for trailer tires on a Sunday afternoon in the middle of nowhere. ( i carry four spare tires in each of my trailers and can usually help "the other guy")

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Oh, forgot about the two trailer tires. Smart advice.  I too also carry two because if you have had one go bad,  then you are like a Pavlov's dog looking for another tire. (the bell rang)

 

I also carry a DeWalt battery powered impact wrench with sockets along with some wood blocks and planks so if I have a flat, I can roll the trailer up on the good tire and the bad tire will be off the ground.  With an impact you should be able to change the tire in less than five minutes, and quickness on the side of the road especially a freeway, quickness is a BIG SAFETY issue.

 

PS: If you have aluminum wheels on the trailer be sure the socket that you have will fit inside the recess for the lug nuts.  Some of the impact sockets will not fit. Check before you go.  For the aluminum wheels that I have on one of my trailers I carry a regular socket to get the tire on & off. Impact sockets will not work.

Edited by Larry Schramm (see edit history)
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I'm looking for someone who has actually towed with a 5.0 litre Ford....is that enough engine for 10k lbs?

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I tow with a 5.3 Silverado with a towing package.  Works fine, but does struggle some in the mountains. There you can see that it is not a diesel.  I live in Michigan, mostly relatively flat so not an issue.   If you drive with the truck rationally, it is fine.  I probably tow only 5-10% of the time and I did not want a truck that was l lot more than I would use most of it's driving time.  If I was towing 25% +, and towing a load closer to the maximum capacity of my current truck, I would have gotten a bigger truck. 

Edited by Larry Schramm (see edit history)
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I would not tow 10k with a F150 with any engine and trans combo, at 10k even a F350 dually is going to be getting pushed around. A half ton truck is ok to haul a lawnmower or other light load. You won’t realize how under powered and light the brakes are till you get in a sticky situation, by then it’s often too late. 2500 Heavy Duty truck is the absolute minimum you should be using to haul a car, and then, I would only use it on the flats for short distances.

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We towed my dad's 35 Auburn last summer using my brother's 1/2 ton Ram with the Hemi.    The Auburn is not a big car,   trailer was 20 footer enclosed.  We only went 100 miles,  but I can't imagine going a distance, or pulling a heavier car with a 1/2 ton.

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On 5/12/2019 at 9:42 AM, TVtommy said:

I'm looking for someone who has actually towed with a 5.0 litre Ford....is that enough engine for 10k lbs?

 

I actually accompanied a friend who towed his 1940s vintage Ford in a 10,000 lb rated enclosed trailer with a then-late model 1500 Series Ford and 5.0 Litre engine.

NEVER AGAIN, UNLESS IT WAS TO GET US BACK FROM AN EMERGENCY SITUATION !

 

The first overpass you come to, you will feel it downshift, initially out of overdrive, and then probably down to 2nd gear, revving substantially over 3,000-3,500 rpm.

But it will upshift as you come down the other side.

That is nothing, compared to when you come to any kind of a modest hill - 

and absolutely nothing compared to getting into any kind of mountains - and I don't mean the Rockies either - just mediocre stuff.

 

My 2500 Series trucks (Suburban, Avalanche, have 8.1 Litre engines, and they do have to downshift,

So does the 2500 version of the Excursion with the 7.4 Litre  Diesel at times,

but a little Half-ton 1500 Series Ford pickup with a 5.0 Litre will be working hard all of the time-

AND - the 1500 will not have the stronger chassis, steering, and especially the Brakes of the heavier series.

 

For the difference in safety, and modest difference in price, I'd never try towing a 10K closed trailer with anything less than a 2500, and go for the biggest engine possible.

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6 hours ago, Marty Roth said:

 

I actually accompanied a friend who towed his 1940s vintage Ford in a 10,000 lb rated enclosed trailer with a then-late model 1500 Series Ford and 5.0 Litre engine.

NEVER AGAIN, UNLESS IT WAS TO GET US BACK FROM AN EMERGENCY SITUATION !

 

The first overpass you come to, you will feel it downshift, initially out of overdrive, and then probably down to 2nd gear, revving substantially over 3,000-3,500 rpm.

But it will upshift as you come down the other side.

That is nothing, compared to when you come to any kind of a modest hill - 

and absolutely nothing compared to getting into any kind of mountains - and I don't mean the Rockies either - just mediocre stuff.

 

My 2500 Series trucks (Suburban, Avalanche, have 8.1 Litre engines, and they do have to downshift,

So does the 2500 version of the Excursion with the 7.4 Litre  Diesel at times,

but a little Half-ton 1500 Series Ford pickup with a 5.0 Litre will be working hard all of the time-

AND - the 1500 will not have the stronger chassis, steering, and especially the Brakes of the heavier series.

 

For the difference in safety, and modest difference in price, I'd never try towing a 10K closed trailer with anything less than a 2500, and go for the biggest engine possible.

Well put Mr Roth!  I might add an extra line that from coming from old school half ton gas engine trucks to one ton diesels and pretty much everything in between adding to your line diesel for a 10,000 GVW trailer tow vehicle.

Robert

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On 5/7/2019 at 10:49 AM, TVtommy said:

Hello, and thanks reading....

 

Is anyone towing open carriers with an F150 5.0L?

 

If so, how is it working for you?

 

 

On 5/12/2019 at 9:42 AM, TVtommy said:

I'm looking for someone who has actually towed with a 5.0 litre Ford....is that enough engine for 10k lbs?

 

You are stuck on the engine.

 

The engine is one component.

 

The towing platform the engine goes into - the transmission it is mated to - the gear ratio of the rear differential - the suspension - the cooling system are

equally important.

 

That truck is not suitable for the application you intend.

 

Jim

Edited by Trulyvintage (see edit history)
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 I just bought a 2015 Silverado 1500.

 I ck'd the towing specs with the oem manual.

 I then went on line and found out that towing specs have been recalculated different in 2019 so that it will tow more than the book and the door sticker said.

 Please check with the latest towing specs to get the legal towing limits.

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Remember that factory towing specifications are based on level ground and ideal conditions.

 

Living in Louisiana in the 70's and 80's, I had a 350 Ford van that did just fine, on Louisiana and Texas flat land.

 

Brought it to Virginia, the first major hill and I was at 10 mph and floored to make it to top.

 

Get the biggest engine you can, with towing package.  When the salesman tells you a small engine is fine for towing, because of all the improvements, he's saying tha you'll be in the torque curve at high rpm....you need torque, not horsepower, to pull a trailer efficiently...

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On 11/9/2019 at 6:32 PM, Roger Walling said:

 I just bought a 2015 Silverado 1500.

 I ck'd the towing specs with the oem manual.

 I then went on line and found out that towing specs have been recalculated different in 2019 so that it will tow more than the book and the door sticker said.

 Please check with the latest towing specs to get the legal towing limits.


Please understand....a 1500 Series vehicle is a passenger car, NOT a truck. Hauling a Mustang on an open featherlight trailer on the flat.........It’s still not adequate. Towing is DANGEROUS! Much more than you can imagine. And going by the sticker on the door tag isn’t the gospel........a half ton pick up IS A CAR. There is a reason the heavy duty 2500 & 3500 trucks are much more money........why don’t you better explain what your trying to haul.........trailer and load.

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I agree with the  statement that 10,000 LBS is too much for anyone's 1/2 ton regardless of engine or towing configuration.  I think I would limit a 1/2 ton to no more than 5000 LBS, car and trailer, and then only with an equalizing hitch.  The proper tongue weight is critical to safety and you won't be able to get there in a 1/2 ton without an equalizing hitch.  If your towing 10,000 car and trailer than you definitely need a 3/4 ton and if you don't want it shifting all the time a diesel.  That isn't to say you can't tow something a short distance with a light truck but you better know what you are doing or it can go bad very quickly and when it goes bad it is expensive. 

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RV salespeople love these silly tow ratings on newer trucks.  They send people down the road carelessly while they count their cash.

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We recently bought a 30 foot tow behind camping trailer.  Salesman asked what was our tow vehicle, I told him don't worry about it.  Finally fessed up to the 2001 3/4 ton Suburban with 8.1 engine (496 cubic inches).  Told him period reviews stated it was suitable for towing small planets, the trailer would be no issue....

 

I agree 1/2 tons aren't suitable, nor are small engines the salesman tells you have plenty of horsepower due to new technology.

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