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I just purchased a rambler to restore I think 66 but not 100% sure. Haven’t been able to search for date but my father in law says it has classic 777 on fender what does the 777 mean please?

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Posted (edited)

That would be the 1966 Rambler "Classic 770". It was a model designation, that's all.

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)
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Is it a two door, four door, convertible or wagon?

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What does the title say as far as the year? Got photos of the car?

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Is this your car?

 

image.png.cf89598684dab45f60eb8428eeaf188f.png

 

Rambler Classic 770 was a medium size, medium price family sedan made by American Motors. They are a well made, durable car popular among drivers who wanted a practical, comfortable and economical car.

 

Suggest you start by cleaning the car out and washing it. Do not throw away any parts or anything of metal or rubber or plastic you can't identify, they always turn out to be some irreplaceable part. If you find parts in the trunk like brake shoes, spark plugs etc that may be a clue why they took the car off the road. Those parts may come in handy. You can throw out the dried up ballpoint pens, old cigarette packs and McDonald's wrappers lol.

 

Don't go nuts tearing things apart. If you go to get it running start by looking things over under the hood, check oil and coolant, see if there are any missing parts, broken wires etc. Then you can put a battery in and see if it turns over. If it has been off the road for several years there is a good chance the gas has gone bad so before you begin, check the gas. You can do this by blowing compressed air into the tank and smelling what comes out. If it smells like gas ok. If it smells like old stinky varnish STOP do not use that gas, it will ruin your motor. To be on the safe side you can disconnect the fuel line at the fuel pump and hook up a motorboat gas tank or gas can with fresh gas.

If the motor turns over you can check for spark.  If you have spark a shot of gas down the carb should make it fire up.

If you have any questions come back and ask. Don't go tearing anything apart until you diagnose it and know what needs fixing. Do one thing at a time. If you tear everything up you make it impossible to diagnose and fix it without going back to first principles and redoing everything.

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Posted (edited)

The 770 was the top of the line of Classic models. It had the nicest trim and upholstery, nicer than the cheaper 550 model.

 

The Classic was their mid range model, larger than the Rambler American but smaller than the luxury Ambassador. It had the same basic body shell as the Ambassador on a shorter wheelbase, meaning it had just as much room inside. When new they were selling against cars like Chevrolet's Chevelle, Olds Cutlass, Ford Fairlane, and Dodge Coronet.

 

You are in luck as far as engines go, by having a 1966 model. That was the first year of AMC's new V8, and the second year of their new 6 cylinder. They were an excellent, durable long lived engine. The V8s continued in production up to 1992, and they kept making an updated version of the six cylinder for Jeeps until 2003.

Edited by Rusty_OToole (see edit history)
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5 hours ago, keiser31 said:

Is it a two door, four door, convertible or wagon?

It is two door and the is a 66 on tail light. I haven’t been to see it yet just bought it drove past it for about 2 months some guy had it in a pile of scrap metal. My father in law was telling me the things he saw when he stopped to give guy money. Bought it for 25$ lol figured it’s worth that

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5 hours ago, keiser31 said:

What does the title say as far as the year? Got photos of the car?

I don’t have photos yet but will post when I go get it here and no title

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4 hours ago, Rusty_OToole said:

The 770 was the top of the line of Classic models. It had the nicest trim and upholstery, nicer than the cheaper 550 model.

 

The Classic was their mid range model, larger than the Rambler American but smaller than the luxury Ambassador. It had the same basic body shell as the Ambassador on a shorter wheelbase, meaning it had just as much room inside. When new they were selling against cars like Chevrolet's Chevelle, Olds Cutlass, Ford Fairlane, and Dodge Coronet.

 

You are in luck as far as engines go, by having a 1966 model. That was the first year of AMC's new V8, and the second year of their new 6 cylinder. They were an excellent, durable long lived engine. The V8s continued in production up to 1992, and they kept making an updated version of the six cylinder for Jeeps until 2003.

I’ve not been in the motor yet but my father in law says the original motor is still in it

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5 hours ago, Rusty_OToole said:

Is this your car?

 

image.png.cf89598684dab45f60eb8428eeaf188f.png

 

Rambler Classic 770 was a medium size, medium price family sedan made by American Motors. They are a well made, durable car popular among drivers who wanted a practical, comfortable and economical car.

 

Suggest you start by cleaning the car out and washing it. Do not throw away any parts or anything of metal or rubber or plastic you can't identify, they always turn out to be some irreplaceable part. If you find parts in the trunk like brake shoes, spark plugs etc that may be a clue why they took the car off the road. Those parts may come in handy. You can throw out the dried up ballpoint pens, old cigarette packs and McDonald's wrappers lol.

 

Don't go nuts tearing things apart. If you go to get it running start by looking things over under the hood, check oil and coolant, see if there are any missing parts, broken wires etc. Then you can put a battery in and see if it turns over. If it has been off the road for several years there is a good chance the gas has gone bad so before you begin, check the gas. You can do this by blowing compressed air into the tank and smelling what comes out. If it smells like gas ok. If it smells like old stinky varnish STOP do not use that gas, it will ruin your motor. To be on the safe side you can disconnect the fuel line at the fuel pump and hook up a motorboat gas tank or gas can with fresh gas.

If the motor turns over you can check for spark.  If you have spark a shot of gas down the carb should make it fire up.

If you have any questions come back and ask. Don't go tearing anything apart until you diagnose it and know what needs fixing. Do one thing at a time. If you tear everything up you make it impossible to diagnose and fix it without going back to first principles and redoing everything.

Thank you for all the info not just you but everyone here I will post pics soon as I can

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You can't go wrong for $25. It's worth more than that for scrap. You need to go over it carefully and figure out what it needs, then make a plan to put it back in commission, or if it is too far gone, get rid of it before it turns into a money pit. Body rust out is a big thing. If it needs a lot of body work it's not worth fixing, if the body is sound and it is complete and you can get it running decent you can fix almost anything else.

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It would help to know where you are, at least what state you live in. Someone may be able to advise on how to get a title. At least get a bill of sale from the seller. Ask about the previous owner, this info may come in handy later.

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14 hours ago, Rusty_OToole said:

It would help to know where you are, at least what state you live in. Someone may be able to advise on how to get a title. At least get a bill of sale from the seller. Ask about the previous owner, this info may come in handy later.

I live in upstate ny and body pretty sound. Floors are gone found a lot of info when I went to see it today. It is a 66 has the straight 6 my plan is to get it to my house then just strip it apart starting with body and motor work on frame and go from there back yard project but like I said 25$ 

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Posted (edited)

Oh....the floors are gone? That will make it way out of proportion money-wise. Do not ever expect to recoup any money put into it if you do a full restoration.

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, keiser31 said:

Oh....the floors are gone? That will make it way out of proportion money-wise. Do not ever expect to recoup any money put into it if you do a full restoration.

I can do a lot of the metal work myself welding etc

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I find it inspiring that you are taking on such a project. The enjoyment you will get out of learning and doing things to it is invaluable. I was lucky to have started out with a fairly rust-free car when I was 15 years old.

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1 minute ago, keiser31 said:

I find it inspiring that you are taking on such a project. The enjoyment you will get out of learning and doing things to it is invaluable. I was lucky to have started out with a fairly rust-free car when I was 15 years old.

That is awesome I want to do this with my baby girl she’s a tinkerer also

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Just now, James1983 said:

I appreciate all of your advice and talk it makes it that much more fun for the drive to do this. Been a long time dream coming I guess 

I’d also love to see your restoration 

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It will be a nice car once it's all done.  Has a nice look to it. Sort of like the 65 Chevrolet Malibu's.  Heck at a purchase price of $25 that's a good start cost wise.  Wish you luck and hope to see progress updates as you go.

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42 minutes ago, James1983 said:

I’d also love to see your restoration 

I sent you a couple of private messages about my first car....

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