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Is this your car?

 

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Rambler Classic 770 was a medium size, medium price family sedan made by American Motors. They are a well made, durable car popular among drivers who wanted a practical, comfortable and economical car.

 

Suggest you start by cleaning the car out and washing it. Do not throw away any parts or anything of metal or rubber or plastic you can't identify, they always turn out to be some irreplaceable part. If you find parts in the trunk like brake shoes, spark plugs etc that may be a clue why they took the car off the road. Those parts may come in handy. You can throw out the dried up ballpoint pens, old cigarette packs and McDonald's wrappers lol.

 

Don't go nuts tearing things apart. If you go to get it running start by looking things over under the hood, check oil and coolant, see if there are any missing parts, broken wires etc. Then you can put a battery in and see if it turns over. If it has been off the road for several years there is a good chance the gas has gone bad so before you begin, check the gas. You can do this by blowing compressed air into the tank and smelling what comes out. If it smells like gas ok. If it smells like old stinky varnish STOP do not use that gas, it will ruin your motor. To be on the safe side you can disconnect the fuel line at the fuel pump and hook up a motorboat gas tank or gas can with fresh gas.

If the motor turns over you can check for spark.  If you have spark a shot of gas down the carb should make it fire up.

If you have any questions come back and ask. Don't go tearing anything apart until you diagnose it and know what needs fixing. Do one thing at a time. If you tear everything up you make it impossible to diagnose and fix it without going back to first principles and redoing everything.

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The 770 was the top of the line of Classic models. It had the nicest trim and upholstery, nicer than the cheaper 550 model.

 

The Classic was their mid range model, larger than the Rambler American but smaller than the luxury Ambassador. It had the same basic body shell as the Ambassador on a shorter wheelbase, meaning it had just as much room inside. When new they were selling against cars like Chevrolet's Chevelle, Olds Cutlass, Ford Fairlane, and Dodge Coronet.

 

You are in luck as far as engines go, by having a 1966 model. That was the first year of AMC's new V8, and the second year of their new 6 cylinder. They were an excellent, durable long lived engine. The V8s continued in production up to 1992, and they kept making an updated version of the six cylinder for Jeeps until 2003.

Edited by Rusty_OToole (see edit history)
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5 hours ago, keiser31 said:

Is it a two door, four door, convertible or wagon?

It is two door and the is a 66 on tail light. I haven’t been to see it yet just bought it drove past it for about 2 months some guy had it in a pile of scrap metal. My father in law was telling me the things he saw when he stopped to give guy money. Bought it for 25$ lol figured it’s worth that

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4 hours ago, Rusty_OToole said:

The 770 was the top of the line of Classic models. It had the nicest trim and upholstery, nicer than the cheaper 550 model.

 

The Classic was their mid range model, larger than the Rambler American but smaller than the luxury Ambassador. It had the same basic body shell as the Ambassador on a shorter wheelbase, meaning it had just as much room inside. When new they were selling against cars like Chevrolet's Chevelle, Olds Cutlass, Ford Fairlane, and Dodge Coronet.

 

You are in luck as far as engines go, by having a 1966 model. That was the first year of AMC's new V8, and the second year of their new 6 cylinder. They were an excellent, durable long lived engine. The V8s continued in production up to 1992, and they kept making an updated version of the six cylinder for Jeeps until 2003.

I’ve not been in the motor yet but my father in law says the original motor is still in it

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5 hours ago, Rusty_OToole said:

Is this your car?

 

image.png.cf89598684dab45f60eb8428eeaf188f.png

 

Rambler Classic 770 was a medium size, medium price family sedan made by American Motors. They are a well made, durable car popular among drivers who wanted a practical, comfortable and economical car.

 

Suggest you start by cleaning the car out and washing it. Do not throw away any parts or anything of metal or rubber or plastic you can't identify, they always turn out to be some irreplaceable part. If you find parts in the trunk like brake shoes, spark plugs etc that may be a clue why they took the car off the road. Those parts may come in handy. You can throw out the dried up ballpoint pens, old cigarette packs and McDonald's wrappers lol.

 

Don't go nuts tearing things apart. If you go to get it running start by looking things over under the hood, check oil and coolant, see if there are any missing parts, broken wires etc. Then you can put a battery in and see if it turns over. If it has been off the road for several years there is a good chance the gas has gone bad so before you begin, check the gas. You can do this by blowing compressed air into the tank and smelling what comes out. If it smells like gas ok. If it smells like old stinky varnish STOP do not use that gas, it will ruin your motor. To be on the safe side you can disconnect the fuel line at the fuel pump and hook up a motorboat gas tank or gas can with fresh gas.

If the motor turns over you can check for spark.  If you have spark a shot of gas down the carb should make it fire up.

If you have any questions come back and ask. Don't go tearing anything apart until you diagnose it and know what needs fixing. Do one thing at a time. If you tear everything up you make it impossible to diagnose and fix it without going back to first principles and redoing everything.

Thank you for all the info not just you but everyone here I will post pics soon as I can

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You can't go wrong for $25. It's worth more than that for scrap. You need to go over it carefully and figure out what it needs, then make a plan to put it back in commission, or if it is too far gone, get rid of it before it turns into a money pit. Body rust out is a big thing. If it needs a lot of body work it's not worth fixing, if the body is sound and it is complete and you can get it running decent you can fix almost anything else.

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It would help to know where you are, at least what state you live in. Someone may be able to advise on how to get a title. At least get a bill of sale from the seller. Ask about the previous owner, this info may come in handy later.

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14 hours ago, Rusty_OToole said:

It would help to know where you are, at least what state you live in. Someone may be able to advise on how to get a title. At least get a bill of sale from the seller. Ask about the previous owner, this info may come in handy later.

I live in upstate ny and body pretty sound. Floors are gone found a lot of info when I went to see it today. It is a 66 has the straight 6 my plan is to get it to my house then just strip it apart starting with body and motor work on frame and go from there back yard project but like I said 25$ 

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1 hour ago, keiser31 said:

Oh....the floors are gone? That will make it way out of proportion money-wise. Do not ever expect to recoup any money put into it if you do a full restoration.

I can do a lot of the metal work myself welding etc

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I find it inspiring that you are taking on such a project. The enjoyment you will get out of learning and doing things to it is invaluable. I was lucky to have started out with a fairly rust-free car when I was 15 years old.

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1 minute ago, keiser31 said:

I find it inspiring that you are taking on such a project. The enjoyment you will get out of learning and doing things to it is invaluable. I was lucky to have started out with a fairly rust-free car when I was 15 years old.

That is awesome I want to do this with my baby girl she’s a tinkerer also

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It will be a nice car once it's all done.  Has a nice look to it. Sort of like the 65 Chevrolet Malibu's.  Heck at a purchase price of $25 that's a good start cost wise.  Wish you luck and hope to see progress updates as you go.

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New York DMV used to be very easy to deal with when it comes to getting a registration without prior paperwork.  I did several many years ago.  Your best bet would be to go to DMV in person and explain your situation.

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I had a '61 Classic several years ago. I grew up just south of Kenosha, Wisconsin where they were built and always wanted a "Kenosha Cadillac" so I bought this one. When I decided to sell it it took me over a year to get $3500 for it so I would recommend not spending a large amount of money fixing it up because there's not much of a demand for '60s Ramblers. Also, some states are easier than others to get a new title for an old car so hopefully NY is one of the easier states. Good luck with your project.... :)

 

 

PICT0052.JPG

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6 hours ago, James1983 said:

I live in upstate ny and body pretty sound. Floors are gone found a lot of info when I went to see it today. It is a 66 has the straight 6 my plan is to get it to my house then just strip it apart starting with body and motor work on frame and go from there back yard project but like I said 25$ 

James did you read any of my posts? Start by cleaning up and assessing what you have. Then work on one thing at a time. Do not go tearing everything apart.  That is a unibody car, if it is badly rusted underneath it is impossible to fix unless you spend more than the car is worth. You may want to tackle it for the hell of it but you should know what you are up against.

 

I would start by getting it running and go from there. On the good side, it is a 2 door hardtop which is nicer and more desirable than a sedan, also rarer. If you get it home I can tell you in more detail how to get it running.

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Yes I have read all of your post.. I am going to do what you say and I probably will tackle the job just cause of the rare find and the 25$ I spent I don’t mind spending a few years on it and taking my time to do so. It does have the straight 6 in it and also the transmission is there body is pretty solid few patches of rust but for being in New York And not being a complete loss I am definitely gonna take the time on it. I know most everyone is probably thinking I am crazy to do it but it breaks my heart to see such a beautiful car fading away to nothing and I don’t have the money to go buy a “decent” fixer upper because when you do find one around here it’s the frame and seats and they ask 20k for it. So all we have in life is time and memory’s so if I get 10 years keeping my daughter into working on it with me it will be worth every dime and time I put into it. 

   On a second note I will definitely take your advice and not just strip it cause that was my original thought was to strip the interior then the motor then the body and work ground up putting it back together. It did seem like everything was there on it with the exception of a few body parts like driver side head light. But motor seemed whole. Just trying to find someone here with a roll back that will get the car to my house so I can really begin to play with it.again thank you for everyone’s advice

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If you belong to the Auto Club they will bring it home for you. You have to tell them on the phone it is for your driver or whatever car is in their records. Usually the tow truck driver is a good sport, occasionally you have to slip him a gratuity.

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First thing you should do before spending a dime more is to get the title issue resolved.  Some states are easy and others are impossible.  If you can't get it titled/registered it is a parts car.  The good news is that you can probably get your $25 back.

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I really appreciate your focus on saving this car. I hope that you are young enough to pull it off. I second the idea of taking it slowly, and trying to stick to one component at a time. 

 

As you continue with the process, you will be looking for other cars, like, or similar to the one you just bought. Trust me I know what I'm talking about, when I say that they can breed like rabbits. Some will be better, some worse, but none will be as cheap as your first.  You may be faced with the dilemma  of which worthy candidate has the best chance at respectability. Keeping your car together is the best insurance for being able to pass it on to someone else, when your idea for the process changes.

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3 hours ago, ol' yeller said:

First thing you should do before spending a dime more is to get the title issue resolved.  Some states are easy and others are impossible.  If you can't get it titled/registered it is a parts car.  The good news is that you can probably get your $25 back.

I’m close enough to Vermont where they will register anything with a bill of sale and create a title done that 100 times with other vehicle 

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To tackle that rust you will need to remove the seats and carpeting, and the drivetrain, to expose all the floor, and the bottom edges of the fenders and such. Get a fair assessment of how much metal work is needed. Whether you want to get it running first, and tackle "one component at a time" is up to you. But the real work will be on the body.

 

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If the floor is real bad you may need to remove seats and carpet but not drivetrain. Most of the time the worst rust out is under the driver's feet then the passenger's. Rear floor probably ok unless the windows were left open or water ran into the car somehow.

 

Unibody cars don't have a heavy frame, the whole body is the frame and it's all made of thin sheet metal. Which is not good for rust resistance but makes repairs easier.

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