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Stewart Warner Vacuum Fuel System Mod

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Just curious here, since Bob’s carries a modern spin on oil filter inside an original style oil filter housing of the 1920-30’s era has anyone modified a Stewart Warner Vacuum Fuel System housing to contain a 6/12volt Fuel Pump and regulator so the look of authenticity however the “convenience”, I guess as I know there are pros and cons to everything, of a modern fuel pump/regulator system??

 

Obviously it would entail gutting and heavy modifications to the SW Vacuum housing to hide a electric fuel pump and fuel pressure regulator inside however I’m just curious if anyone has attempted it ?

 

Again, I know there are pros and cons and as many of you know I just got my ‘27 Standard running after sitting since AT LEAST December 2004, maybe earlier, when the prev owner passed away and the car sat in the garage untouched till Summer 2018, and I elected to rebuild the S&W Vacuum Fuel Pump/System and just got the car running last week and first real drive on the road will be this Saturday!

 

I am anxious to hear from everyone on this and curious if anyone has tried this modification!

 

Please join the fun and let’s hear from everyone on it.....

 

”Pictures is not my car, just a pic on topic, if it is your car.... wow she is Purdy!”

04B9AD52-57CA-4ACF-B0F5-55D9559CDAEE.jpeg

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Posted (edited)

William, 

    The vacuum tank is "too high" in elevation from the fuel tank to hide a fuel pump in.  The pump could be installed in the fuel line along the frame.  Then you have to make the vacuum tank a pass thru, which you could do with some hose or tubing inside the canister, if you wanted to make it look authentic.  The last big hurdle is the needle and seat in the carburetor.  It can only handle about 1 psi, so you would need to modify the carburetor to accept a modern needle and seat.    To stay with low pressure, you would also need to add a fuel regulator after the fuel pump.

 

To their credit, If the original systems are set up well, they work well.  The more often you  drive the car, the better they work.     Hugh

Edited by Hubert_25-25 (see edit history)
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Great info Hugh, no worries I’m staying with the stock configuration but just curious if anything has tried this modification.

 

I was thinking the day, it would have to be a pass through within the Vacuum tank housing.

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the electric fuel pump needs to be mounted near the fuel tank to push the fuel, but no reason why the fuel pressure regulator couldn't be mounted in the vacuum tank.

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When I purchased my 1917 D45, It had the 6 volt fuel pump and regulator mounted back close to the tank.  They soldered and redrilled the inlet fitting to vacuum tank to restrict flow.  Then they replaced the tank vent with a return line to the gas tank.  fuel recirculates but the tank is always at atmospheric pressure.  My experience with the regulators on the fuel systems  is that they do not hold a consistent pressure in the 1 to 2 psi settings.

 

Bob Engle

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When I got my car, an electric pump fed the carb directly - leaked like heck.

I had a vacuum tank that had no guts.

I left the electric pump at the tank, and built a float mechanise that fitted in the original vacuum tank.

The pump fills the tank which then gravity feeds the the fuel to the carb just like it originally did. Plus, it looks entirely stock

Engine 3.JPG

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Don, 

   I like that set up because it would be much easier to install a modern needle and seat into the vacuum tank than on the carburetor.     Hugh

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I used a modern needle and seat in the vacuum tank.

Even with the original carb needle and cork float, I dont have leakage problems. The carb doesnt know that I cheated in that vacuum tank.

 

One nice thing about this setup, that after the car has been parked a long time, I dont have an issue with getting gas into the vacuum tank. The electric pump fills it and the engine starts quickly.

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2 minutes ago, DonMicheletti said:

I used a modern needle and seat in the vacuum tank.

Even with the original carb needle and cork float, I dont have leakage problems. The carb doesnt know that I cheated in that vacuum tank.

 

One nice thing about this setup, that after the car has been parked a long time, I dont have an issue with getting gas into the vacuum tank. The electric pump fills it and the engine starts quickly.

 

I'd love to see the actual set up.....

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