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Locomobile 4 Cylinder Gathering Place


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Here is an original type E from Henry Austin Clark's Collection. Chassis #1322, Motor #1583, was sold at Bonham's auction house in 2008 for $128,000.

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Good thought on the early service car that may or could be a Model F Locomobile.  My comments on that picture is that as a service car the original rear hubs/wheels may not have been husky enough to hold up to the work they were expected to do.  It is very likely that the rear hubs/wheels could have been changed out for something more robust, as in the Model L or Model H  or Model I parts.

Al

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  • 3 weeks later...

Has anyone had your Locomobile out for a drive lately.  Share a video or post a picture.  I am anxious to see what is up and running and where.

Al

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I just ran across this picture of a Blue 1909 Locomobile Model I Toy Tonneau on the internet.  What a nice car.  Does anyone know this car?  I have not seen this car before unless it has changed colors?

Al

image.thumb.png.a70eb4111564885267310af6bef583b3.png

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To be the "best built American car" these cars sure don't seem to get out much. I would think the chance of breaking a Locomobile would be slim, which is why so many were converted to trucks. The values I have seen aren't that high when compared to many other marques. So why are they squirreled away and rarely used? Our fearless leader says he knows of quite a few that have never been restored and languish in barns and buildings and garages waiting to be put back on the road. It is such a proud and wonderful car; seems a shame they are used more for eye candy than actual use. To have the "best built American car" set seems the worst thing ever. If any car deserves to be driven, it would be the Locomobile. It seems the worst thing that could happen to a Locomobile is a restoration, because then it is too valuable to enjoy in the usual way of driving. Seems such a shame to me. It seems the only time you see a Locomobile is when it passes over the auction block. So Sad.

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  • 2 weeks later...
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Posted (edited)

What stress, is put on your life-style, brought on by the current Pandemic?  Are you both (and others) able to keep a low profile and simply stay out in the garage working on your early Locomobile projects?  Do you have any projects underway, that could be of mutual interest here and to other antique automobile  guys?  It may help us all "keep it together" if we have a daily goal to let others know what is going on while we survive Coronavirus.....

Al

Edited by alsfarms
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  • 1 month later...

hmmm, looks like a three has been painted into the radiator.  That should be a help for locating an ID.   The front axle looks like it has the dip but is a bit different that the Locomobile axles that I have seen and am familiar with .  I would have to study more pictures in order to make a good guess.  That is a very nice action picture.

Al

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hmmm... I just had a thought.  If you can research Stearns, take a look at the front of a 1909 or earlier Stearns chain drive.  That is a long shot guess as to the make.

Al

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  • 2 weeks later...

Nice picture, and most certainly the Locomobile front axle that sets them apart!  I like the 1906-7 Model H Locomobile, too bad there is not more of them so more of us could have a chance to own one!  Thanks for posting.

Al

PS: notice the security. I wonder if they are military or police?  I wonder as the guy on the left appears to be holding a , then new, 03 Springfield rifle.  I have one of those rifles in my small gun collection and it is one of my favorite guns!  What are your observations on the security, I can make out likely four security guys in this picture.  I wonder if some big dignitary is present to require the weapon toting security?

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  • 3 weeks later...

I thought I would share with four cylinder Locomobile owners several pictures of a late engine that was probably the last design.  This engine is likely a 1916 - 1917 RIker truck engine built by Locomobile.  The engine spec's. are 4-1/4" bore , 6" stroke , five main bearings, manganese bronze crankcase and full pressure oiling.  I am anxious to study this engine and determine how much of this engine  was pulled directly from Locomobile stock or how much was designed just for this Riker engine.  I have to get it freed up as it is currently stuck.

Al

Picture one 

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Picture four, Share your knowledge and thoughts on this Riker marketed and Locomobile built engine.  If you happen to have a Riker fan assembly in your spare parts bin, I am missing the fan as you will note above.

Al

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Posted (edited)

J. Leslie C. Brand's Tioga Wolf 1913 model 48 Locomobile, converted to a truck by Moreland Truck Co., now Peterbilt.

 

 

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The history of this car is known except for a short span of time in the middle and it exists today in much the same condition as in this picture. See below

 

 

Leslie C. Brand's Tioga Wolf, Southern California Locomobile ...

 

Picture taken on a 2012 HCCA tour of the Redwood Forest.

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Edited by AHa (see edit history)
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  • 1 month later...

I am looking for ideas and parts to mount a Warner Autometer and Warner clock on the dash of the Locomobile Toy Tonneau.  I would like to see similar instruments mounted on your dash to get ideas for my own installation.

Al

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Here is a picture of a shortened and not fully original , but very nice Locomobile Model L speedster.  I bet it runs as good as it looks!  This car has been recently sold.  Does anyone have information on this automobile and where is now lives?

Al,

1911 Locomobile Model 30 (CC-996199) for sale in Saint Louis, Missouri

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I just received, from a gracious friend, a copy of the 1908 Locomobile Book.  If anyone needs information that would be in this book,  drop me a note.

Al

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Posted (edited)

I will post a few pictures from the 1908 Locomobile book just to share with other enthusiasts here.  Here is the "E" Model touring car.  Stately for sure....

Al

 

 

 

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Edited by alsfarms
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Posted (edited)

Here is another picture of a 1908 or 1907 Locomobile Model E Limousine.  I am not sure I would enjoy the side lights placed in the position these are, if I were the chauffeur.  Other than that...what a great automobile.

Al

 

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Edited by alsfarms (see edit history)
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Posted (edited)

Here is a picture of the big offering from Locomobile in 1908.  This image is of the Locomobile Model I touring car.  This automobile is certainly the stuff that dreams are made of!

Al

 

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Edited by alsfarms
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I, for one, am amazed that the type E Loco was only rated at 20 Horsepower. The Ford model T, produced in late 1908, was rated at 22.5. If the ALAM method was employed for both motors, the Loco would be higher in h.p. than the Ford. Why would the Loco company under rate the horsepower so substantially? The point was to sell cars. If I could buy a model T for substantially less money and get more horsepower, with a similar wheelbase, why would I buy a Locomobile? Looks like Locomobile was very good at shooting themselves in the foot!

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I would like to speak with a current owner of a Model E Locomobile and see what the performance is on this model.  HP is certainly a subjective matter, actually even in the modern world!

Al

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Posted (edited)

Here is a picture of a Model E Locomobile Landaulete,  I have seen a similar Locomobile body on a Model L Locomobile.  This is an impressive and formal design.

Al

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Edited by alsfarms
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Posted (edited)

From the 1908 Locomobile Book, here is a picture of the front and rear view of a Model I Locomobile.  We can only dream!  I do see many similarities between the Model L (first shaft drive) and the Model I (last chain drive).  The Model I and Model L were built as sister cars in 1909 and 1910.   I will venture a guess that a significant amount of the basic pieces are in fact interchangeable.  Does anyone here have better knowledge than I have on that subject?

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Edited by alsfarms
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Dick Shappy has this 1909 Locomobile "30" Model L touring car for sale.  It is in very original condition and would be an excellent starting place.  Does anyone have previous history on this automobile?  Look this one up and get in touch with Dick if you are interested.

Al

1909 Locomobile Model 30 Touring

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