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1938 Buick Limited brake master cylinder hose


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I have a question about what the rubber master cylinder hose connects to for a 1938 Buick Limited.  The hose has a male end and a female end.  The male end obviously connects to the master cylinder but I am not sure what the female end connects to.  The non-stock cylinder I pulled off the car connected to a metal line. which connected to a junction box with the brake switch.   The metal line has two male ends, unlike the rubber hose.  So the junction box I need to connect to has a female input so the hose wont connect to it.  I am sure I can probably find some type of male/male adaptor to make it work, but I am wondering how this connection was made originally and if anyone sells the parts.  The rubber hose was used from 1936 to 1938 on the Series 60 and up models, so I am hoping somebody might have some idea what I am talking about.  Bob's Automobilia seemed confused when I asked them, so I might be asking the question in the wrong way.  I am also kind of curious as to why a rubber hose was needed in the first place.  Whoever restored my car obviously didn't think it was necessary.  Unfortunately, the metal line wont work with the new stock cylinder that I have on hand.

 

Thanks for any help anyone can provide.

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17 minutes ago, oldbuicks55 said:

I have a question about what the rubber master cylinder hose connects to for a 1938 Buick Limited.  The hose has a male end and a female end.  The male end obviously connects to the master cylinder but I am not sure what the female end connects to.  The non-stock cylinder I pulled off the car connected to a metal line. which connected to a junction box with the brake switch.   The metal line has two male ends, unlike the rubber hose.  So the junction box I need to connect to has a female input so the hose wont connect to it.  I am sure I can probably find some type of male/male adaptor to make it work, but I am wondering how this connection was made originally and if anyone sells the parts.  The rubber hose was used from 1936 to 1938 on the Series 60 and up models, so I am hoping somebody might have some idea what I am talking about.  Bob's Automobilia seemed confused when I asked them, so I might be asking the question in the wrong way.  I am also kind of curious as to why a rubber hose was needed in the first place.  Whoever restored my car obviously didn't think it was necessary.  Unfortunately, the metal line wont work with the new stock cylinder that I have on hand.

 

Thanks for any help anyone can provide.

It seems a bit odd. I have never seen a rubber hose connected to a master cylinder. They usually have a metal line that goose to a fitting block with the brake light switch and a metal one to the rear of the car and that flex hose and the two rubber hoses that go to each wheel cylinder on the front. You might PM Brian Depouli, he has a 1938 series eighty car.

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Thanks for the reply.  The rubber hose is definitely correct as that is what the shop manual refers to (and also what Bob's sells as being correct).  Unfortunately, the shop manual doesn't show enough detail to indicate how the rubber hose connects to the metal brake lines.  That is currently the missing piece of the puzzle for me.  The car was restored back in the early 80's, so they probably went with whatever master cylinder they could find that was close in size, but used a metal line instead of the stock rubber hose (and whatever part I am missing).  The non-stock master cylinder failed recently and is pretty scored on the inside so it needs to be replaced.  I ordered the replacement from Bob's as well as the hose.  I might need to change the title of this thread to 1936-1938 Buick Series 60-80-90 to get more of a response as I know there aren't too many 38 Limiteds out there.  My 1941 Buick has the metal line coming from the master cylinder, so that is no help.

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Are there other fittings that could be used? We recently had to adapt the gas tank fittings on an ancient car to something for which we could fabricate new lines--whatever they'd used wasn't something commonly available to us today. We were ultimately able to modify a flared brake fitting that would work and join everything safely.

 

Alternatively, is this a show car? If not, perhaps using a later master cylinder and a metal line would be better/safer? Even though it was correct, a rubber hose seems like a failure waiting to happen and I'm sure that's why they changed it shortly thereafter. It would certainly save you some headaches in finding the right fittings/hoses.


Just a thought. Good luck with the solution, I'm interested to see what you find.

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My 1938 66s has that. I replaced with the SS braided hose. As I recall (I did it last summer) the hose went from the master to a tee junction. One line went from the tee to the front and one to the back. Lying on my back it was an execrable job to remove/replace the master. I have to get it relined and I am paying someone to do the R/R on a lift!

 

Cheers, Dave

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I don't know about 80 or 90 series but here is what the 1938 Model 61 master cylinder hose looked on my project car. The hose connects to a junction block that is mounted on the frame which supplies the front and rear brake circuits. 

DSC_0603.JPG

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Matt Harwood--Your 1941 Century blog was a great help to me when I was getting my own 1941 Super back on the road about 12 years ago. So a belated thanks for that. My 1938 Limited was a show car back in the early 80's when it was restored.  I think it won best of show at the 1983 BCA meet long before my ownership.  It still looks nice but  the restoration shows its age as it has put on some miles since then and the lacquer has failed in spots .  I have had it for ten years now and while I prefer to keep it stock when possible, my main goal here is to make sure it stops when I want it to.  The brake system is clearly not stock, so I am going to try and find the best solution I can.  I think you are on to something about not going back to the stock route.

 

Dave--looks like we live close by each other, I am sure I have seen your 1940 Buick at the All GM show at Montgomery College.  Been a while since I have shown a car there.

 

MCHinson--Thanks so much for the pictures.  That helps solves a lot of the mystery.  I think the Limited must be a little different given where the floor access hole is from the top but the stock cylinder must still connect to the transmission somehow, which explains the need for the rubber hose.  The non-stock brake system on my car is routed completely different as my master cylinder was attached to the frame with a bracket, so they also went with a metal line instead of a hose.  I must be missing more pieces as I don't see anyway to make the stock master cylinder would work without some kind of bracket that attaches to the transmission.  Even with a bracket I don't see how it would reach my brake pedal and be under the floor access hole.  My brake line junction box is also quite different.

 

So it looks like my best option right now is to either sleeve the cylinder I have on hand since I know that works with my configuration or to find another cylinder that is compatible per Matt's suggestion.  I will start another thread to see if anybody knows the original application for a Wagner Lockheed FD-4862 cylinder.  It is the same size as the stock Delco cylinder, but the mirror opposite.  I googled it but found no info about it.

 

Thank you again to everybody for your input!

Lars

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I wish I could say that the master cylinder lined up closely with the hole in the floor, but that would be a lie. This was not some of Buick's best design work. I suspect that the Limited would be at least slightly different from the Century. While the engine an transmission are the same, the frame is not. If you would prefer to put it back exactly like it was originally, I suspect that Dave Tacheny would probably have all of the parts that you need to restore it to the original configuration. He even had a NOS master cylinder for the 1938 Century when I was looking for parts. If I recall correctly, I have that here somewhere since I had my original one resleeved before I got the NOS one from him. I have no idea if yours would take the same master cylinder, and to be honest I don't even recall if I still have that one, or if I sold it to someone else. It is amazing how much stuff you forget when your project gets put on the back burner for several months.  

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