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I thought the first photo was the actual car, and when I saw the price, I thought wow! Sure was disappointed when I clicked on the next photo.......ūüėü

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The photos show that it also comes with a folder with the make and model of the car on it. Nice!

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How many enthusiasts would tackle a basket case like this in the hobby today. I would be tending a much lower offer on a package like this being a closed car.  

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I saw this ad a month ago.  Yup,  if i was a crow and real close maybe I would swoop in to try to rip it free, but I think the engine is some crusty thing that needs everything and the owner would want a premium for even if he had a spare.  That's a big pile of parts right now. . I don't think he offered anywhere that it is an original supercharged car either which obviously effect the value of it as a project or parts. 

No sense in cloning my car into a supercharged car.  I would just add the correct manifolds so the pipes could be utilized and leave it at that.  

 

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In ACD circles, the seller is probably not too out of line on price and reasonable offer on such  - but to get the money they will have to be much more sharing as to what all the parts are there and ... - these cars are not fun jigsaw puzzles, less fun when incomplete (parts are egregiously expensive), and engines are a bag of worms with supercharging are even a larger bag of worms.  Seller also has to realize a project like this too is a pure plain n the ... to even move from one garage to another.  

 

The hierarchy of prices for parts sort of goes "generally" like this:  Duesenberg is 1st, Cord is 2nd, Auburn is 3rd, Rolls-Royce is 4th (except for cylinder heads and then they come in 2nd), Ferrari, and ... 

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Posted (edited)

Might be better to trundle over to Tupelo and bid on the '37 Cord 812 SC basket case next weekend(no idea how many will show up for that Bonhams auction, though).

 

66152012-770-0@2X.jpg?rev=2

 

 

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)
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I read somewhere that you have to be an electrician to restore one of these. 

 

 

Bob 

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  In reference to the 810-812 , once you are by the transmission, it is just a restoration.

This is not from by personal experience, but what I have been told from others who have ventured down that road. 

 

John, I think there are a lot of cars that are more expensive to restore than Cord & Auburn. 

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Looks like a car that will prob be parted before its put together.

 

The parts should bring 20k with no problem.

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Posted (edited)
46 minutes ago, 1937hd45 said:

I read somewhere that you have to be an electrician to restore one of these. 

 

 

Bob 

No, you do not need to be an Electrician ( you "generally" only need to be an electrician for a 57-58 Cadillac Eldorado Brougham or a 1961-1967 Lincoln Continental) - just helps to be an Engineer.  

 

When we have the Auburn out a lot of people ask about Cords.   Dad's reply is pretty classic:   Are you an Engineer ?  If they reply no, then he asks if they are handy ? If they reply no, then he asks  if they have a lot of disposable income?   And if they reply no, then his reply is that you  should probably not have one as they will be a disappointing car for you.    There are a few Cords around here and a few Auburns too that people bought as they see us all over town (discounting  what is involved to actually be able to drive it regularly - for that matter not realizing what it takes to even have one in the garage and not even move a foot). 

 

In all seriousness though, it just takes patience and you have to address problems straight on and realistically.   There is a lot of knowledge out there, but equally I see so many people really not listen to such.  Example: When someone tells you they have around 20K in their Cord Supercharger and you think you can do it better and for less money, keep in mind that you may be able to do exactly just that, but most people I know of that thought so turned out to have 14K in it (plus tons of evenings, weekends,  and stress) or built something that is pretty shaky. 

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)
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I would take on the Cord project, I have a lot of idea's that are running through my little custom brain. Auburnseeker would be able to buy all of the engine parts to. I would take good care of that poor, neglected sedan.:D The white one at auction will bring a good number. Cars like that can be thrown in the corner and not touched. Resold in 5-10 years for a profit, they are just not making them anymore. Auction fees are what will eat up a persons profit down the road. I have a building to lease, no Cord in my near future.:(

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There is so much we don't know about this Cord, that appraising its value within a reasonable range is iffy.  It is referred to as both a Westchester and a Beverly, but it can't be both.  Maybe the owner thinks the bustle trunk makes it a Bev... but what actually makes the determination is the interior.  There seems to still be confusion about this. 
It looks like a project that didn't go beyond the dismantling step.  I'm not too optimistic about the unknowns such as; rust, the mechanicals, (Transmission and engine especially), the instruments, front fenders, and wheels, of which good ones all are pricey stuff.
I hope it isn't going to end up being cannibalized.  If much of the items in question are blah it will probably be shed of remaining usable Cord-peculiar parts and then the hulk perhaps be street rodded, if not chopped up..  If on the other hand it can be acquired reasonably and the unknowns aren't a horror story it could be a fair candidate for a home restoration by  someone with good mechanical skills.   In earlier times some sedans that were downright awful were occasionally brought back,  but with the current cost of restoration, it's not so likely in these times. 

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2 hours ago, Curti said:

 

John, I think there are a lot of cars that are more expensive to restore than Cord & Auburn. 

Curt, you/Auburns Midwest certainly have made made maintaining and restoring 34-36 cars much more enjoyable.  When Charles Koch and I did the 1931 Phaeton it was a pretty miserable process of parts unobtainium via days of pre-internet and ...

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59 minutes ago, Dave Henderson said:

There is so much we don't know about this Cord, that appraising its value within a reasonable range is iffy.  It is referred to as both a Westchester and a Beverly, but it can't be both.  Maybe the owner thinks the bustle trunk makes it a Bev... but what actually makes the determination is the interior.  There seems to still be confusion about this. 
It looks like a project that didn't go beyond the dismantling step.  I'm not too optimistic about the unknowns such as; rust, the mechanicals, (Transmission and engine especially), the instruments, front fenders, and wheels, of which good ones all are pricey stuff.
I hope it isn't going to end up being cannibalized.  If much of the items in question are blah it will probably be shed of remaining usable Cord-peculiar parts and then the hulk perhaps be street rodded, if not chopped up..  If on the other hand it can be acquired reasonably and the unknowns aren't a horror story it could be a fair candidate for a home restoration by  someone with good mechanical skills.   In earlier times some sedans that were downright awful were occasionally brought back,  but with the current cost of restoration, it's not so likely in these times. 

The higher the amount all just depends on what they have and what the condition is - and how willing they are to photograph, describe, and ... 

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In the not so long ago early 90s a local had two sedans in similar shape for sake, around $3k per, for 4 or 5 years.  I lost track of what ever happened to them...

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6 hours ago, Steve_Mack_CT said:

In the not so long ago early 90s a local had two sedans in similar shape for sake, around $3k per, for 4 or 5 years.  I lost track of what ever happened to them...

Start tracking them down.  I might be interested. 

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Posted (edited)
14 hours ago, jeff_a said:

Might be better to trundle over to Tupelo and bid on the '37 Cord 812 SC basket case next weekend(no idea how many will show up for that Bonhams auction, though).

 

I didn't look it up but assuming this is an original SC car I think it will bring some decent coin.   Although the market is going away from restoration projects.

 

I mostly agree with John's comments.  The age of the back yard restorer or tinker is passing and these cars require someone patient enough to sort them.     My dad has owned his car for almost 55 years and restored it himself in the 1960s.  He went back and forth from Mass to Auburn twice in the late 60s.    Never had a problem then or since.   Of course,  I'm probably jinxing things.

 

Curt is also correct,  once you get the transmission setup correctly,  everything else is pretty standard.

IMG_4997.jpg

Edited by alsancle (see edit history)
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Great car.......too bad about your face.

 

 

Just getting even!ūüėé

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It seems aside from the mechanicals,  a Cord might be cheaper to restore than alot of cars.  They are fairly simple in design,  very little extra stuff.  There isn't a lot of trim either once you get paste the grille which is stainless and the windshield assembly.  Bumpers can be broken down into small pieces.  That impressive dash is one big facia panel.  I scored mine either NOS or a perfect reproduction for $100.  As long as you start with a pretty complete car,  it doesn't seem like it would be too bad.  If mine hadn't been converted I would be driving it by now.  It's the mentality of some of the guys with the cord parts stashes,  that if you need a part,  well it's a Cord so the parts are going to be expensive.  It doesn't seem to follow the normal supply and demand process.  I think if there are say 1000 cords on the road or intact,  (I have no idea what the number really is). there are atleast enough parts people have saved to build another 1000 cars.   Seems every Cord guy saved everything.  

I met one fellow that restored twenty something that sold me rechromed show quality bumper guards cheaper than I could buy Ford bumper guards.  He was the exception to alot of the guys I have met and I bought a few thousand dollars worth of parts off him including stuff I didn't really need because it was nice and very fairly priced. 

If you go by what the market will bear price wise,  sell some Cord parts on ebay.  That shows you a true market value.  Many will be very disappointing.  I sold a few extras and they did terrible,  but on the other hand I have bought some nice stuff pretty cheap on there. 

One of the reasons I haven't chased down an engine or parts car real hard yet.  Too many other projects and the right one will come along.  One thing I have found.  Cords are not very rare.   Somewhat desirable,  yes,  rare definitely not,  you just rarely see them out at anything but concourse events.   I had never seen one until I bought mine.  

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Posted (edited)
14 hours ago, auburnseeker said:

Start tracking them down.  I might be interested. 

If I thought the cars or gent was still around I would have done that for you already.  Tail end of a very active time of hobbyists in my home town of west hartford, CT.  Guy was in big circle of car folk, darned if i can recall his name.  Brace road if you have any old directories, one sat outside as I recall.  Probably long since moved down the road Seeker...

Edited by Steve_Mack_CT (see edit history)
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59 minutes ago, Steve_Mack_CT said:

If I thought the cars or gent was still around I would have done that for you already.  Tail end of a very active time of hobbyists in my home town of west hartford, CT.  Guy was in big circle of car folk, darned if i can recall his name.  Brace road if you have any old directories, one sat outside as I recall.  Probably long since moved down the road Seeker...

From the '89-'90 ACD Directory;
Cliff Demers
170 Brace Rd. W. Hartford, 06107
203 521 3750

Happy hunting auburnseeker, et al.

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3 hours ago, edinmass said:

Great car.......too bad about your face.

 

 

Just getting even!ūüėé

 

I was an amazingly attractive 25 year old once.

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