Sign in to follow this  
ROBERTWILLIAM

1927 Packard

Recommended Posts

Wow.......a Pebble Beach car for 30k............who knew!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At least they didn't call it a barn find. I can see it now: "featured marque: six-cylinder Packard sedans of the '20's!". I didn't know they made Non-Skid tires that big.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, when I go to Pebble Beach, I most look forward to seeing all the 6-cylinder 4-door sedans.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

A perfect shuttle bus for Pebble Beach perhaps. And at the buy it now I doubt it is going anywhere fast. But still quite a decent survivor.  What would be a realistic price ? 20 G's tops ?

 

Greg in Canada

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What is the image on the cover of the owner's manual?

A building complex? An aircraft carrier? A Louisville barbecue pit?

 

pack.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe it is the Packard plant viewed from the air.

 

Greg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rather well-preserved Single Six.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very nice car.......value is depressingly low.........

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Current market Value $ wise may be depressingly low - BUT quality value for the build of the car is high , the 6 cylinder cars were made as well as the 8 cylinder cars.

But that is only my opinion, and no I do not own a 6 cylinder Packard, never have, but friends have that I have experienced with great satisfaction .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Walt, I agree, nice car. Just no one collecting them.  Similar story on the Pierce Series 80/81 six of the twenty’s.

 

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love it! Wish I could find a way to buy something like that.

As to realistic value? An old friend of mine passed away about fifteen years ago. Among his cars were a couple late '20s Packard sixes. One of them was bought by a money-grubbing investor. A couple  (maybe three or four now?) years ago, it came on the market again. A '28 (maybe '29) if I recall correctly, mostly original sedan with a mediocre '60s paint job. Otherwise, a very decent car. The investor marketed the car, listing after listing on eBad. The price started out at over $30K. Went down, and down, month after month, lower and lower. I really would have loved to have gotten it, but I am WAY too broke. But I watched. Decent, running,  tourable. Took about a year. It finally sold, for just UNDER $10K.

With the current interest in "true original survivor" cars, I suspect this one should go for somewhat more. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

There are classic cars (  in the pre WWII era time span not the post war 1950s-60s era cars some people deem/define as  classic ) that are still out there , in decent shape that can be purchased and enjoyed . Because they do not have multi cylinders, or open body styles that may make them not as "valuable" . Quality built cars that were at the upper end of the car market when new. As Ed mentions this is true for the series 80/81    6 cylinder Pierce Arrow as well as for the 1920s 6 cylinder Packards. Nothing wrong with the cars except the current popularity/ interest among collectors due to lack of number of cylinders . I believe Studebaker President series cars of the late 1920s fall into this category as well especially in enclosed body styles.

Kinda like steak and hamburger, can be the exact same meat but one is prettier and the bragging rights about what you had will always go with what most think is more impressive by name or how it looks.

Edited by Walt G
typo (see edit history)
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/19/2019 at 10:10 AM, suchan said:

 I didn't know they made Non-Skid tires that big.

I was a surprised when I saw it had Non-Skids on it too - kind of cool all be it I am thinking they are not reproduced in the size as I would guess I would have seen something else along the same lines with them at a show/tour. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

While not a Packard expert this appears to be a 426 or 433.  This would make it a full classic per the Classic Car Club of America.  In my book a car with either 126 or 133 inch wheelbase would be a car I would love to be behind the wheel of.  I think I could live with 6 cylinders.   

Edited by 32Pontiac6 (see edit history)
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Many years ago,  I had a series 80 Pierce Arrow four-door sedan. I loved that car. Toured it for several years. Truly a pleasure to drive. However, when my wife and I bought our "first house"", we had to sell the car. If that hadn't taken the car from me, any of several things that came along in the years that followed would have. Personally, I like sedans, and coupes. I have had several of both bodies from the nickel era over the years, and would really like to have another. In the meantime, an open model T will have to do.

I have always enjoyed seeing the enclosed cars at shows, and on tours! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm glad to see that there are still high quality cars of this vintage available for reasonable prices. 

It allows those of us without Jay Leno-checkbooks to enjoy a fine motoring experience and helps to keep ordinary working-class guys in the hobby.  

Packard Six and Pierce-Arrow 80's, as said, are built every bit as good as their big brothers and in many cases without the complication of the larger cars. Due to their smaller size they can be easier to maintain and repair, and a  more enjoyable, easier driving experience. 

Although not the same vintage as the car in question, I've heard this statement applied many times to the Packard 120 of the 1930's.  Guys who own or have owned Super 8 and 12 cars often choose driving the smaller car for the pure enjoyment of the road.

 

-- Luke

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When the advertisement speaks of it as being the perfect builder for Pebble Beach, I probably would "good look" at it as both a 100 point car and as a preserved and cleaned up original (not all that many 1927 Packard's have survived in this condition no matter if a 6 or an 8, what the body style, or ... and encourages people to get original cars to a functional level verses hiding in the back corners of garages), that being said though the buyer would have to be willing to loose some serious money to turn it into a 100 point car.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are many survivor Packard's out there in much better condition that this one for less money, but anything that can be cleaned up and made safe is fun to drive. This car will never be invited to Pebble Beach anyway, so drive it around town like I do with my 901 and enjoy the high fives and waves from admiring folks at local shows and just have fun. I saw a 1932 12 cylinder car open car at Hershey last year for $1.3 M, and I suspect it was no better to drive than my under $ 50,000 sedan. Parts for these cars are expensive, and this one may become parts for some open car like so many others. One thing about Jay Leno, is that he appreciates all of them no matter what level or condition, which is good for our hobby.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

901 is correct....the only way this car makes it to the eighteenth green at Pebble Beach during car week is if you drop it out of a helicopter. Still a nice car and lots of fun for the next owner. Maybe a perfect car to let the grandchildren learn to drive a stick. If you think it’s had to sell this car now, wait another twenty years where only people born before 1980 know how to shift a car.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

4 hours to go. At  $13,900. Reserve not met.   -   CC 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2 hours. $13,900. 11 bids. I have a feeling the "value" will be established rather accurately today. From our distance, the 17,+++ miles could be the real total. Drivers seat seems plausible. This car needs the most meticulous cleaning/preservation, and a thorough, rigorous mechanical sorting. The wheels should come off wearing the non-skids, stored for HPOF and other judging. Another set of 5 wheels should be restored with the highest quality blackwalls mounted in order to put enough well maintained and synthetically lubricated miles to turn the speedo over. Depends on how kind or lack thereof the storage was on this old Packard. If you could get it as roadworthy as possible for an equal amount of money as the purchase price, that should be regarded as a HUGE success.  -  Carl 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is no point in bidding. With a buy-it-now of $36,900.00 you figure the reserve is at least $30,000. So why bid? If you wanted a fair market value you'd need a no reserve auction.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I agree with you 100%, Mike. With 5 minutes left, this car has already reached "market value" at $13,000-$14,000. Pretty much as the guys figured. It will not sell now, this is just a fishing trip. Eventually it will sell for what someone is willing to pay. And that has just been established.  -  Carl 

Edited by C Carl
Refinement (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And there you have it. Next thing the dealer will do is put a "Price Reduced : $29,999!!" sign on it. If he wants to sell it, most likely it will eventually go for between $11,999 😏, and $14,999 😊. But it will take a very long time to get there. Patience. Fishermen have very peaceful patience. IMHO, we have just seen a very market savvy "fish on". Actually, two of them. Previous, also realistic bid, was $13,600.    -    Carl 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this