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  • 1 month later...

Nothing has come up for sale.  Just bought another 1914 Chandler so my "project" for a T head speedster will be put on hold for a while.  Thanks for your interest.  I enjoy reading your posts on your Locomobile.

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I bought the mostly complete 1914 Model 15B from the Harold Wintz estate in Iowa.  Already went there and brought it back home to Seattle WA. It is only missing the correct tail light, which was also used on other cars of that period.

I also have another 1914 Chandler Model 15 that is mostly complete but needs all new wood.  The chassis are almost identical, but the bodies are different.  Chandlers are a direct descendant of the 1913 Lozier Model 77 touring which I also have.  Now I just have to get busy, and put my priorities in order. 

A T- head speedster will just have to wait.  I will keep my eyes open should parts show up though.

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After Lozier began building cars in Detroit, the BOD pushed Lozier off the BOD and out of the company.  Shortly after that seven of the Lozier senior officials left Lozier and formed the Chandler automobile company.  Originally they wanted to call it the "Emise", after the marketing manager, Charles Emise but he wasn't in favor of that so they named the company after Frederic Chandler.  In fact the first literature for Chandlers list the seven individuals by name and state for each their position with the Lozier company, e.g. …"formerly with the Lozier automobile company".  The first Chandlers were almost duplicates of the 1913 Model 77 Lozier.

If this had happened today, they probably would have been brought up on charges of "manufacturing espionage".  Lots of things were in fact different, but the resemblance is definitely there.

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

The Lozier slogan of the time: "The Choice of Men Who Know.

 

The slogan Chandler adopted: "Built By Men Who Know"

 

Coincidence? I think not 🙂

 

Like Loizerman I am also a member of the Chandler-Cleveland Club and was fortunate enough to purchase the other 1914 Chandler model 15 touring at the Harold Wintz Estate auction. These early Chandler models were very different than the cars they evolved into as the company began to learn to make cars and innovations on their own. 

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Thanks for posting the picture.  That is a nice looking car.  I am not real familiar with Lozier or Chandler, but I can see some kinship between the cars with the shape of the radiator.  How similar is the engine between the two automobiles?

Al

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  • 4 weeks later...
On 6/17/2019 at 2:11 PM, alsfarms said:

Thanks for posting the picture.  That is a nice looking car.  I am not real familiar with Lozier or Chandler, but I can see some kinship between the cars with the shape of the radiator.  How similar is the engine between the two automobiles?

Al

Great thread, nice to learn about the early cars relations to one another. I noticed the similarity to the radiators too. Only Lozier part I ever had was a brass hub car that I got for ten dollars. Bob 

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 8/1/2019 at 2:39 PM, erichill said:

My 1919 Chandler motor. L Head.

IMG_3409.JPG

IMG_3453.JPG

Looking good Eric. I see a few differences in six years of development. Interesting that Chandler stayed with the same basic design for so long. I might be wrong but the next generation engine was probably the Pike's Peak motor in 1923.

 

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  • 11 months later...

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