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I found a car that I'd love to own, but


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But what? You want to enjoy the car and have fun with it, BUT, the Chevy motor is stopping you. Do you plan on restoring the car? If you really love the car as you say, buy it. More and more people I talk to, are getting away from restorations and point judging and enjoying their cars.

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A blown big block definitely isn't for everyone.  7 or 8 MPG if you are on the throttle. What about the rest of the drive train ? It probably puts out an easy 650 H.P. that isn't a mild 350  with a 2 bbl. Also I see it has a Camaro clip, not an antique car anymore. Someone's Rod dream, now the next owner's possible nightmare.

 

Greg in Canada

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)
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3 hours ago, 46 woodie said:

But what? You want to enjoy the car and have fun with it, BUT, the Chevy motor is stopping you. Do you plan on restoring the car? If you really love the car as you say, buy it. More and more people I talk to, are getting away from restorations and point judging and enjoying their cars.

Honestly, I'd be embarrassed to be seen with it. A big block Chevy in a rare, desirable senior Chrysler (with ultra-rare side mounts) strikes me as just plain childish. No, I wouldn't enjoy the car and have fun with it as it is.

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I will say that virtually every guy who brings a hot rod in to sell in my shop says the same thing: it's boring. I don't know what their goal was when they started or what they expected, but it's rarely what they want when it's done. I don't even think they know what they want, only that they've convinced themselves that an old car isn't what they want. That mindset probably comes from what they've heard from other people or things they assume about old cars being unreliable or hard to drive (you should hear how many grown men whine about needing power steering, but that's another story for another day). 

 

I bet the owner of that Chrysler will say it drives like a modern car. Unfortunately, I already have a modern car.

 

What I don't have is a car that drives like a 1940 Chrysler New Yorker. 

 

 

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
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I actually appreciate Hudsy Wudsy's perspective. I don't even like seeing fuzzy dice in a front window. (Really :D )

 

But I'm not an "originality commie"...my cars have to be functional and affordable. I put an aftermarket radiator in my survivor because I wanted to do right by the engine during more demanding driving conditions. I can always put the old one back in after I get it recored. I saw an old Galaxie on another forum that was beautiful and stock, though not original, but the 22+ inch wheels weren't my thing. A simple change the steel wheels and covers wouldn't be difficult, though.

 

That Chrysler, however, is a little different. It comes from the "every old car is a dragster" perspective, which I don't buy into, even though I love the old hot rods and gassers from the 40's, 50's and 60's (that was a different era.)

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52 minutes ago, Hudsy Wudsy said:

Honestly, I'd be embarrassed to be seen with it. A big block Chevy in a rare, desirable senior Chrysler (with ultra-rare side mounts) strikes me as just plain childish. No, I wouldn't enjoy the car and have fun with it as it is.

Put a Hudson motor in it.:D

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I think just once I'd like to see someone buy a well-known hot rod that has won awards and then restore it to stock configuration. I would enjoy the teeth gnashing of the community that claims it takes a real man to cut up a car and who think that we're kooks for not wanting a small block Chevy in everything we drive.

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But you sold the darn car on me.  Really wish things were different and we could have done some horse trading with my Cord.  I know it wasn't original and would always have that stigmatism attached to it,  but honestly for another 10G and a bunch of labor,  I could have been driving an Auburn Speedster.  I think original ones are trending in the 300G range.  60G or 300G.  Quite a gap I don't see bridging in the near future without some long lost uncles big inheritance. 

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I have nothing against traditional rods, as long as they were built a long time ago or recently built with one of the new steel body's . I can't see taking a decent stock Model A , 32 Ford, 33/34 Ford Etc. and rodding it. Happens all the time unfortunately. I see even 40 Ford coupe body's are now being reproduced. What's a hot rod anyway ?

 

Greg in Canada

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Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)
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8 minutes ago, sftamx1 said:

I saved this '32 ET from becoming a SBC powered hot rod. He had the original engine ready to pull!

 

Four lug wheels, that's an eight. It is really a peppy car to drive.

 

12 hours ago, Hudsy Wudsy said:

Honestly, I'd be embarrassed to be seen with it.

Just driving along on the road or when you stopped and opened the hood?

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Very pretty car that can be used as is , but my personal view if I was going to buy it would be that I would have to know where I could  buy/replace all the parts that were removed so i could bring it back to its original state over a period of time - complete engine and transmission, front seats, wheels(?) . the rest of the car is good but needs work - paint etc. so you have to consider that a factor as well. An 8 cylinder Chrysler with a factory overdrive option from that year is an absolutely  marvelous thing indeed. I think priced at what it is is a bit high if you want to consider getting it back to original as I mentioned. Best wishes in your decision.

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Unfortunately with the Camaro front clip you would probably need to change the entire frame. I doubt it was a bolt in. You are buying the body, and hopefully get a 1/2 decent price for the engine / trans combo. A very round about way to buy a car. Mind you that engine probably cost $12,000.00 at least to build so it is no doubt worth 1/2 of that to the right person.

 

Greg in Canada

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3 minutes ago, 1912Staver said:

Unfortunately with the Camaro front clip you would probably need to change the entire frame.

 

Whether it was a Camaro clip or Pinto crossmember, those modified cars really messed up the Ackerman Principles. I have seen some that had to back up twice or more to turn into a driveway.

 

Ed Moore, in Bellingham above, helped my Daughter out when she first moved to Boston. She had a Buick Roadmaster I gave her and it got whacked in the rear door by a snowplow. I called Ed and asked if he could help her get a door. He asked "What color?" He had a gray one.

About 10 years before Ed had bought a '33 Terraplane Eight chassis that I was planning to build a Railton body on. Some of that money went into Christmas presents for her.

 

A note on my Railton job, Mr. Bell, the owner of the Miss Daisy Hudson offered to let me measure up his Railton for my repop

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Where the heck are you getting these giant numbers on the engine in that car? Easy 650 horsepower? $12,000? I see a used big block of unknown specification with a $400 swap meet B&M blower on it, although "thumper" cams are designed to sound like top fuel dragsters at idle without making the power that comes with it. I'd be surprised if it runs right, never mind putting out serious power. I have a working TH400 transmission in my store room that I bought for $150 and a running LS5 454 that I got for $700 (both of which I contemplated dumping into my Lincoln when its engine's future was questionable). The parts are neither rare nor valuable and I can almost guarantee that the guy didn't dump an expensive, pro-built, high-horsepower, well-tuned engine into that particular car.

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Matt , you must go to much better swap meets than I do. Last C.J. I built was $ 9,500.00 { the good old days when the looney was close to par} in parts and machine work, excluding the cost of the core, and no forced induction just a single 4160 Holley on a sidewinder. And it ran 550 on a chassis dyno with a S/S legal cam and stock C.J. manifolds into street legal turbo's. Mind you there was also a second hand set of Dove heads I got a very good deal on . A blower has to add 100 H.P. on a bad day, and Chevy's generally breathe better than 428 Fords. But yes, there are lots of tired, bone yard parts out there.

 

Greg in Canada

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, 1912Staver said:

Unfortunately with the Camaro front clip you would probably need to change the entire frame. I doubt it was a bolt in. You are buying the body, and hopefully get a 1/2 decent price for the engine / trans combo. A very round about way to buy a car. Mind you that engine probably cost $12,000.00 at least to build so it is no doubt worth 1/2 of that to the right person.

 

Greg in Canada

Camaro  sub frame is the proper term, a front clip is the hood, fenders, and grill assembly. 

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4 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

I think just once I'd like to see someone buy a well-known hot rod that has won awards and then restore it to stock configuration. I would enjoy the teeth gnashing of the community that claims it takes a real man to cut up a car and who think that we're kooks for not wanting a small block Chevy in everything we drive.

NOBODY has the money to afford the purchase of a Top Shelf Historic Hot Rod, much less the desire to make it stock again. 

 

 

Bob 

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I gave up on street performance over a decade ago. That " built " C.J. went into a Cobra replica , also my back up 427 Lo-riser. Stock C.J. for my Cyclone . 

 These days I am playing with this. I know 99% of you couldn't care less about track cars, but I find them interesting. And there is a AACA class for them.

1973 Elden F3 / FB. 1 of 6 built. { rare ?} Modified with a 175 HP FSV engine and full width body for SCCA C sports racer use. I am not a VW guy so a cross flow 1600 is going in in the near future. The T.C. Lotus engine it should have is a bit spendy for my limited budget.

  I figure I still have a 10 year window for the track, and continue to gather up/ make parts for my Staver basketcase.

 First two picture's are what it looked like in 1973, and what I want to return to.  Two different rad positions/ nose cones.

Unfortunately Matt I don't find parts for this at the Swap Meet.

There is a tie in with this thread. Car was basicly "rodded" in the early 80's, I am returning it to "stock".

Greg in Canada

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Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)
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"Clip" is what you do to the rear of the Camaro subframe so you can splice it to the sacrificial project car. In front, where the frame horns are on old cars, is usually turned into a "cluster".

 

So no comment is agreement with the apex of the Ackerman coming out wrong?

 

That old Chrysler never had much going for it before it was chopped up. There has always been one of the brand sitting neglected in any junkyard. They are usually complete, not even a demand for used parts. I remember looking at a single sidemount '39 Plymouth once. It was an ex-Navy car with a canvas sidemount cover. I started poking around a little but that riled up the wasps so I moved on.

Bernie

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13 hours ago, 1937hd45 said:

If you like it buy it, keep the hood closed if the BBC bothers you. Bob 

A couple of you have suggested that I should be content to buy it and drive it as is. That's exceedingly unrealistic given the constant racket coming from that blower and it certainly wouldn't be my idea of a pleasant Sunday drive. If I had more money than I knew what to do with, I might see buying it for the body, or at least the front fenders and side mounts. New Yorkers and Imperials show up for sale from time to time and those side mounts are quite rare. Just like the one of you who mentioned buying a built rod and restoring it back to original, I have to admit that there's a part of me that resents this disaster enough that I would enjoy undoing it.

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3 hours ago, 60FlatTop said:

"Clip" is what you do to the rear of the Camaro subframe so you can splice it to the sacrificial project car. In front, where the frame horns are on old cars, is usually turned into a "cluster".

 

So no comment is agreement with the apex of the Ackerman coming out wrong?

 

That old Chrysler never had much going for it before it was chopped up. There has always been one of the brand sitting neglected in any junkyard. They are usually complete, not even a demand for used parts. I remember looking at a single sidemount '39 Plymouth once. It was an ex-Navy car with a canvas sidemount cover. I started poking around a little but that riled up the wasps so I moved on.

Bernie

You know, I've noticed others in this thread regarding it as just any old car and not worth much regard, if any. I never would have started this thread if the car in question had been a Royal or Windsor, but a New Yorker is just beneath an Imperial in rank. It was an eight cylinder, longer wheelbase car and more scarce by far than the six cylinder models. Maybe you'll understand if I try likening it to Buick's line up -- this New Yorker aint no 40 series Special. This car was Chrysler's Roadmaster. Thirty nine was a somewhat unique year for Chrysler products style wise and not every Chrysler product lover is crazy about the styling offered in this transition year. I remember being quite shocked as a kid when I first saw the front end on these. I thought it was quite ugly at first, but over time came to admire the unusual "waterfall" grille.

Edited by Hudsy Wudsy (see edit history)
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I would be asking 2 questions. Did you keep the parts you took off and do you still have them? What would you take for the car without the engine, wheels, tires, and other wrong parts?

 

If you could buy it for 5 grand and find another New Yorker with a good frame, suspension, engine etc you would be able to make a good car with twin side mounts, if that is what you really want.

 

Or you could buy a different car that has not been butchered and is in good shape. But, not likely you will find another with twin side mounts.

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6 minutes ago, Rusty_OToole said:

I would be asking 2 questions. Did you keep the parts you took off and do you still have them? What would you take for the car without the engine, wheels, tires, and other wrong parts?

 

If you could buy it for 5 grand and find another New Yorker with a good frame, suspension, engine etc you would be able to make a good car with twin side mounts, if that is what you really want.

 

Or you could buy a different car that has not been butchered and is in good shape. But, not likely you will find another with twin side mounts.

Correct on all points, Rusty.

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30 minutes ago, Xander Wildeisen said:

 

 

Sadly, the dash was one of the weakest points in a '39 Chrysler. The plastic which surrounds the gauge set was an early plastic, tenite, perhaps(?), and prone to warping and cracking in some climes. Also, the paint under the glass was prone to peeling. Xander, you joked earlier about putting a Hudson engine in this Chrysler. Coincidently, I have a 254 (eight cylinder) out in my garage with everything needed to rebuild it. That wonderful, whisper quite old splasher would be a big step up from that "teenager's dream" that is under the hood now.

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