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Brake Parts?


MBL

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I took a look at the X-Ref thread and was a bit confused about the brake part #'s. I was unable to find them on the autozone website. Am I using the search wrong? I just typed the part # in the regular search and got no matches. Also I found several part #'s for the chevy rear drum application. Is there any sure part # that is being referenced when it says 53-65 chevy 3/4 ton? I will be going to the store to pick up the wheel cyls today. It seems odd that the front brake shoes don't have any cross ref. Is it possible that they are the same as the rear with the 12" drum? That might be a stupid question but I have not taken the front drums off yet.

Any help on this would be great.

Tim

MBL

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the brake shoes for my 56 Executive are definatly GM most likely chevy. Take the brake shoes to the auto parts store and show them to AN EXPERIENCED parts man. Sometimes part numbers, especialy older numbers are rebuilder specific and do not necessarily cross into modern numbers or other rebuilder numbers. The part numbers on the X-ref are there not necessarily for modern reference but for scrounging old stock at swap meets and so-forth.

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Well I took a look at the rear ones. They look like they have all of the meat still on them. I think they were replaced right before they gave up on this car. Either way I haven't looked at the front yet but if its the same deal I might have some time. I picked up those wheel cylinders. I figure if it has been sitting for a while I should just be safe about it. Are there any drums that are interchangable. If anyone knows post a holler. <img src="/ubbthreads/images/icons/smile.gif" alt="" />

Tim

MBL

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The front shoes are 12*2 1/4 the rears are only 12 * 2 and no cross ref, the 54-56 with 11" drums are wagner #160 front and 161 rear whicj are used on 1959 ford taxi full size & full size OLDs 88 89 custom cruser ,delta royal regency 1949 to 64 front 160 and rear 161.

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Packard V8 is totally right on.

IMHO, the only choice is to take your shoes/drums to an "old" parts store and talk to the "old hand" there who can recognize these shoes/drums by sight. That's how I found replacement shoes for my 1955 Pat. I have Hollander I/C for these years and sometimes these books are more confusing than helpful. Hollanders xref's to xref's and these xref's are Hollander numbers which might have been useful for wrecking yard owners (the original intent) in the 1950-70s, but don't necessarily Xref to anything a NAPA clerk (who was flipping burgers last week) will know. My local CSK has a clerk who is incoherent even for oil choices! How these guys get a job is beyond me, but anyway...

There probably is an "old hand" in some parts store in your town. Seek this guy out. Even bring your Packard by. I did that and did THAT make an impression! Maybe then you'll get some personal service.

No one ever said this hobby was easy or cheap! <img src="/ubbthreads/images/icons/blush.gif" alt="" />

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Guest Randy Berger

I am lucky enough to have here in Pgh. a shop that will reline your existing shoes. If you don't have a spare pair, your car will be laid up for a day or two. I think they charged me $30.00 per axle the last time I was there - "come back in about four hours" was the answer to "When will they be done?"

They reline clutches, brakes, anything. Old, dingy, dirty, cheap and fast. <img src="/ubbthreads/images/icons/grin.gif" alt="" />

YFAM, Randy Berger

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Hey Randy!

Great advice. And if you can't find the answer there, then there is an old time brake shop here in Las Vegas, for those who don't have one near at hand.

CraigLV, aka WcraigH in "lost wages".

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I have a friend in Tiverton, R I. that relined the rear shoes for my '55 Clipper. It was dirt cheap. He had the original style lining material in his shop, including the rivets. The one thing that he wised me up to is to measure the brake drums. As the drums wear, the diameter increases. What happens then is the shoes will wear faster at the center than at the ends. The shoes should be shimmed so the wear is even, insuring full braking effect.

Bob

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Good point gentlemen! Having the existing shoes relined is a good idea. Altho, i believe those sohes are a common enuf GM application that a parts store should be able to match them up. IF, u have the existing shoes relined i would request RIVETS. Some shops only want tot bond. Recently i had a set on M/c shoes relined loacaly. The man at the shop wnated to bond. We talked about it and he agreed to bond AND rivet and at no extra charge. The problem with bonding OLD shoes is the possibility of rust or other metal contamination. Mosty everyone wants to go the hi-tec bonding. I would insist on rivets over bonding. Or Both is ok too.

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Also, have the ENDS of the linings slightly champfered. This will keep the lining form cracking if the match of the radius is not exact with the drum due to wear. NEW/jobber relined shoes from a parts store is rarely champfered.

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I had my shoes done for my 54 Clipper Special (11in) as well here in Toronto for $40cdn for both axles, but the 11in are quite commom for the older fords as well as the gm's the 12in is a different story, not sure what else they where used on, never mind some had 14in shoes..

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Where would you get the linings with rivets? Is there a way to just get linings and some rivets and install them yourself..I mean without going to Kanter to get them. Are linings made for this purpose? It would seem that they would be available at such relining services, or they make them from a universal piece.

Tim

MBL

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a GOOD brake shop installs the linings from bulk stock. I wouldnt bother installing them myself since the brake shops usually do not charge much for installation. I have installed them but u will have to make a special punch and block to do it. they r not real difficult to make and the riveting process not difficult either. BUT, counter drilling the lining is tricky. Just let the brake shop put the linings on for u. Thats what i do and noone is stingier with a dollar than i am.

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Guest Randy Berger

I believe rivetted linings run cooler because the bonding glue insulates the lining from the shoe. However I prefer bonded lining because rivetted lining will accumulate dirt/dust in the rivet holes and that abrasive will damage the drums. Just personal preference - the shop I used would have rivetted the lining as well as bonding - I just like bonded lining better. And I'll match Keith for cheap any day <img src="/ubbthreads/images/icons/wink.gif" alt="" /> - just ask my friends! <img src="/ubbthreads/images/icons/smirk.gif" alt="" />

YFAM, Randy Berger

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