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In the general sense, asking someone who knows them, what are the good points and weak points of the car, the 6 cylinder motor, etc...  Things that stand out both good and bad. Mechanicals, etc...

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As a long time owner of a 1929 Master (29-41) I can attest to the durability and bold design in the manufacture of these cars. The 1929 and the 1930 are almost identical underneath the sheet metal. The engines were probably the most heavy duty of any cars of this era. Buick supplied its engines to GMC Truck , American LaFrance and many others that require longevity. Many sawmills were Buick powered as the dependability made them extremely sought after. The chassis was built like  a tank as well. If you are considering purchasing one there are quite a few thigs to consider . First is completedness. Too many missing or damaged parts can add up to exceed the value of the car. Body, especially the wood , ie. top bows, door post, etc. replacement of these are painstaking . These cars can be made into a solid, dependable driver quite easily. There is a wealth of information on the forum,  ask away. 

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I know that Model A parts are very easy to come by.  Buick parts tough to find? Earliest vehicle I have owned was a 40 ford 2 -1/2 ton truck.  So cars from the 1928-32 would be a learning curve for me.  Am not looking to buy a restoration project but a good solid driver.

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23 hours ago, Brooklyn Beer said:

I know that Model A parts are very easy to come by.  Buick parts tough to find? Earliest vehicle I have owned was a 40 ford 2 -1/2 ton truck.  So cars from the 1928-32 would be a learning curve for me.  Am not looking to buy a restoration project but a good solid driver.

 

This is a hard question to answer, because it really depends on the part you're looking for. It's certainly not as easy to find Buick parts as a it is for a Model A. I would say that most parts you need to keep a '30 Buick on the road and drivable are available, or there is a substitute/alternative. Bob's ( https://bobsautomobilia.com/ ) is a great source. It can be hard to find some ornamental items, or mechanical parts that are not mission critical. I've never been able to find the diaphragm that opens the radiator shutters, so I leave them open. There is a great group of Prewar Buick enthusiasts, so it's likely someone can give you advice on an issue you're trying to resolve.  I love my '30 Buick.

Edited by Buick64C (see edit history)
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Congrats on considering a prewar Buick!  As a new (we bought it Summer if 2018) owner of a 1927 Buick Standard “Model 27” I have found the folks here in this forum to not only provide the information I’ve needed but a wealth of QUALITY INFORMATION on the details I was looking for!  And these gentlemen will tell you I ask A LOT of questions!!!

 

So when radurr says “Ask away...” it truely means just that!  

 

Good of luck on finding the car, I am hoping to hear mine for the first time this week and maybe just maybe see it move under it’s own power!

 

(Pic below is from the day we brought it home Summer 2019)

A28F2067-FE05-48B9-A77A-52C4C309E05B.jpeg

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On 4/14/2019 at 10:30 AM, Buick64C said:

 

. I've never been able to find the diaphragm that opens the radiator shutters, so I leave them open. 

 

Perhaps you tried, and Jim Otto in Knoxville, TN was not able to help you. In the chance that you are not aware of him (Retired Sylphon engineer who rebuilds such thermostats), try calling him.   865-966-9494.           Anyone who has one of these, working or not, should consider a rebuild/refresh soon, if it has not been done for years.   -   Carl 

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7 hours ago, C Carl said:

 

Perhaps you tried, and Jim Otto in Knoxville, TN was not able to help you. In the chance that you are not aware of him (Retired Sylphon engineer who rebuilds such thermostats), try calling him.   865-966-9494.           Anyone who has one of these, working or not, should consider a rebuild/refresh soon, if it has not been done for years.   -   Carl 

I wasn’t aware of him. Thanks!

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It is really hard to find one of the shutter diaphragm's if yours is missing.  The best method I found was to purchase an entire radiator on eBay which come up from time to time (assuming the diaphragm is present), keep what you need and then resell the radiator.  I acquired one this way and had Jim Otto rebuild it.  Pretty much broke even on the radiator and was only out the cost of the diaphragm rebuild.

 

Thanks,  

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Having had three Master engines, I feel safe in saying a weak point is the water jacket for the cylinder block. All three of my engines had cracks along the lower section of the water jacket on the left side of the engine. My current (VERY long term) project's engine has two cracks there, one being 27" long. And yes, that is nearly the full length. And no, I have not been able to locate a replacement block. And no, I cannot afford to fix it. Unfortunately, the other two blocks were sold to a scrap iron man by my father, not realizing they were mine, so I can't rebuild them. He was of a different time. He once sold running Model A for $5 and a Model T body for $10. Of course, we never liked Fords much, anyway.

I don't need to worry too much about it, though, as rebuilding the wood for the car is in its 18th+ year. One tends to get frustrated and/or lose interest occasionally. Now that I have retired, I hope to get back into it, so it doesn't fall upon my son, as he has his own projects to worry about.

 

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If you want a stylish car with room and performance, go for the Buick. If you want a cheap (in its day) run-about with less room inside, go for the Model A. They are quite different cars and were in quite different market segments. The Buick probably cost two or three times what the Model A did.

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I have a '29 standard, which shares some of the same parts as a '30  series 40 and is otherwise of a similar style design.  So far the items that have given me trouble are the pot metal carburetor (very easy to break/crack), the heat riser (most people block it off, but you have to block it off in at least 2 places), and the exhaust manifold - this last one was my fault, though - it is easy to crack the cast iron if you are not careful re-tightening the bolts when you take the manifold off to put in new gaskets, for example.

 

I think the carburetor itself functions OK, but I had enough trouble with the pot metal bowl cracking or leaking that I replaced it with a 1928 brass bowl Buick carb.  I have been happy ever since.  You may also wish to replace the original venturi block with a new, non-pot metal version that is more durable.  Some people like Tony Bult in Wisconsin have made new ones that he sells or installs in all carbs that he rebuilds.

 

Two other things about the engine - when removing the bolts for the manifold, it is a good idea to drain or partially drain the coolant first, because you may find that removing one particular bolt will cause the coolant to flow out of that bolt hole.  I asked Tony B. about this, and he says that he has seen this happen on other Buick engines ('26-'29); ie, sometimes the bolt holes were drilled too far and they penetrated the water jacket.  The other area where some people have trouble is cold starting - it can take awhile for fuel to get pulled up to the carburetor, and you usually want full or heavy choke when you start.

 

John

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1 hour ago, Brooklyn Beer said:

So tell me what sets apart McLaughlin Buicks from US made Buicks?

 

I have been wondering this myself!?!?!?

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If it is anything like a Dodge Brothers, there will be Canadian content that is different. Mine has Canadian made generator and starter (made by the Mackinnon Industries, St Catharines, a division of DR in Canada) and Canadian wheels, which are different. The hub caps are larger than US ones and the spokes are 2 gauge, whereas American ones are 3 gauge. I expect other parts will be made in Canada too, maybe wiring, seats, door linings and so on.

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A difference which applies to both Fords and Plymouths of the 1920s, and maybe others, is the use of Robinson screws in Canadian cars vs Phillips in US cars.

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After 1925, nothing but a name tag and maybe some interior and exterior colour options.

Before that it mostly varied in upgraded trim options with the same drive train and body.

Before the two names, when they were just McLaughlin, totally different story

Not sure about the Robertson screws, everything was slotted on our '25.

 

Brad

 

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" When better Buicks were being built, McLaughlin was building them"

 

Bill McLaughlin

1929 McLaughlin Buick Roadster

Supporter of All together Chronological Parking

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1908-1918 - first contract McLaughlin had with Buick supplying the chassis and running gear and McLaughlin building the bodies

 

After, they were much the same, but McLaughlin-Buicks tended to have a bit higher finish / trim / interior.  There were things like different hub caps (although essentially the same in many cases, just had the longer name).  

 

After WWII, the McLaughlin name was gone, although Canadian cars did have some differences in model / style numbers and some years like 1952, the US Special was replaced in name by the Canadian DeLuxe.

 

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