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1918? Buick 4cyl


Sarge65
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Sarge65,   This line of 4 cylinder  buicks,  with the 170 cubic inch engine on  a 106 inch wheel base,  were introduced in  August 1916 as the 1917 models D34 roadster and D35 tourer.  They were carried over into 1918  as the E34 and E35  A Sedan and a delivery truck were also produced in this series. The tourer sold for $795 when new. 

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9 hours ago, Sarge65 said:

E-35 then. Has back seat. What's a rough value of it? I know it's hard to judge with my poor pictures. Looks to be original. Top looks shot . 

 

DEPENDS on what you want to do with it and if it runs.  From pictures, does not look like it runs. 

 

About four years ago I saw an unrestored car like that one that ran and drive for about $10,000.00  I know that the person that was selling it had been trying to sell it for at least a couple of years at that price.  Probably worth about 1/2 that price, especially if it is not running. 

 

If you are going to restore it, will never be worth what you put into it.  Example if the engine needs to be gone through, think about $1,000.00 a hole which is 4 cylinder =$4.000.00 + -.  Top and interior consider $10,000.00, probably more.

 

I could go on, but you get the idea.

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Looks like it has been restored at one point or another, maybe long ago:

 

1. It has synthetic rubber tires; if original latex rubber, they would be rotted to shreds

2. Has glass in the windshield;  check to see if safety glass....these cars originally had plate glass which usually breaks, restorers use better glass

3. I see paint; if original the paint would be mostly gone

4. Wood on running board looks too good to be original, same as headlight

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2015 Collector Car Price  Guide puts the value of #5 condition E35 at $4780...that is being generous.   Prices are not going up on Common Brand teens cars.   Having owned 4 different teens 4 cylinder Buicks (D and E Models) I can attest to them being fun to drive but don't expect any great return on investment when you sell.

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You'll probably be way ahead to spend $10,000 on a car that's drivable rather than $5000 on one that isn't.

 

The sad fact is that given the cost to make it drivable and the value once it reaches that state, it's essentially worthless as it sits.  Do you spend $20,000 and a couple of years on a $10,000 car, or do you put down $10,000 now for one that's already where you want to be?

 

OTOH, if you're interested in the journey rather than the destination, maybe the emotional satisfaction you accrue along the way mitigates the financial hit.

 

Another thing to consider: is this a car you really want, or just one that happens to be available?  Because it doesn't cost any more to restore a desirable car rather than a common car, and the process doesn't go any faster because the car was cheaper when it was made.  Point being, if you're going to invest a bunch of time and money in a project, make sure it's something you want instead of something you settled for.

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Come on guys, the car under that tarp might be in good shape, might even be a #4 or #3, how do you know? All I see is one tire, one headlight, a door, a fender, and a windshield, and they all look good! Take the tarp off, put some Marvel Mystery Oil in the motor, in the gas, in the blinker fluid, in all the zerks, pour some Marvel Mystery Oil on a rag and clean the exterior with it, and it's done.

 

Just thinking positive. It's in a nice garage, not a hog barn........maybe it's an old trailer queen that got dusty.

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In my mind a #4 has to start and take me down the road, it is usable mainly "as is"   a #5 car may or may not run but needs major restoration in most areas.  If the car has great tires you can give credit for that or if the top is shot and you want to use it then deduct for that expense.  For us that like to drive them, #4 is just fine...if you want the pleasure of bringing it back to life #5 is a consideration or even a fairly complete # 6 not necessarilly needing the $1000 per hole engine work.  The cost to take a #5 to say a great #3 or low #2 is just too great(return on investment) unless you can pickoff the expenses of several major areas of restoration yourself. Interior,top, side curtains, bodywork and paint, engine work that might required boring, honing new pistons, babbitt work and align boring.  These things all add up fast.  A number #5 or #6 may require major re-wood work so add carpentry skills to the project.  Being able to drive and access is great...the 4 cylinders had straight beveled rear end gears made by Weston Mott, couple these with the jerky leather cone clutches and it was a recipe for broken teeth on the pinion and ring gears. Minimally inspect the ring gear through the oil plug.

 

They are fun to drive.

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4 hours ago, tblack said:

  Being able to drive and access is great...the 4 cylinders had straight beveled rear end gears made by Weston Mott, couple these with the jerky leather cone clutches and it was a recipe for broken teeth on the pinion and ring gears.

 

They are fun to drive.

 

I think I know someone that has been there done that. :)

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Thanks for all the input.  Was told it ran when it was parked back in the 80s. Been shedded since.  Body looks to be decent.  Driveable as is.  As long as engine turns over what would be a fair price to pay? 

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2 hours ago, Sarge65 said:

Thanks for all the input.  Was told it ran when it was parked back in the 80s. Been shedded since.  Body looks to be decent.  Driveable as is.  As long as engine turns over what would be a fair price to pay? 

Yes.   Larry I think I fit that rear end of yours  in the back of my saturn!!!  It ultimately went into my little converted truck.

 

Per Price Guide a #4 car is listed at $7960...for that price I would expect it to run, have a clutch with some life left in it, rearend exhibit no problems,  the wood in the wheels would need to be sound and generally the body wood sills ok.  The top bows should be ok and hopefully enough of the top is there for patterns.  I would expect the top side saddles to be there, and the speedometer drive gears and speedo cable housing to be present.  Sitting since the 80's expect the gas tank to be filled with tar and the vacuum canister maybe in a  like condition. The tires maybe old but holding air is a plus before investing in +/- $1000 in new shoes. To me running commands the higher price and lessens the mystery of what is yet to come.    I would hang with the lower price #5 as an offer. As it sits non running it is a #5 unless the seller can demonstrate otherwise. Hopeful the car is local and there is not significant shipping costs.   Do your homework before you leap. Good luck

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I know a thing or two about cracked cylinder blocks.  Depending on where and how bad it's cracked, there is the possibility that it is fixable.  If you tear the engine down and have the head and block magnafluxed, there is a pretty good possibility that the cylinders could be OK.  Check out the Stitch-n-Lock casting repair process on YouTube.  Absolutely amazing what can be done with a casting that is cracked.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Was the cracked blocked disclosed prior to sale?  Unless it was explicitly "as is, where is", etc. (and "it drove when parked" would seem to carry a heavy implication of no such problem), it might be a reason to have a chat with the seller...

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Shame about the block...could be the reason it was parked in the 80's...I sold all my 4 cylinder parts to a guy named John Henry I think he was from Mass. I do not have his contact info but maybe someone in this forum does.  What went with the parts was a 1918 engine short block that was was completely redone, pistons babbitt and the works.  Sounds like it might be the ticket for your project.  What Terry says about the stitching process is true, I had a crack repair on my 1931 chevy back in 1982 and it still holds fine.  A far less expensive approach is the pull the engine determine the the extent of the crack, thoroughly clean and V groove the crack drill the ends so it does not spread and repair it with Devcon or JBweld.   These are not pressurized blocks so if you make a clean repair it will hold. If the car is a keeper get a price for stitching as an alternative.   Another weakness in these engines of this era was the wrist pin to piston fit, often times the pin loosened and would score the cylinder.     You might want to pull the head and inpect if this situation ever occurred.

 

How is the rest of the car?  interior looks original...sheet metal looks good.  Is the starter generator there and ok.  Guard your distributor cap with your life$$$.

 

 

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Congratulations!  I hope the car brings you many smiles.  I’m not that far from you, but the border can sometimes imply a long ways.  If you aren’t a member, consider joining the Buick Club of America and the Gopher State Chapter (based in the Twin Cities).  I’m a GSC member as well.  Lots of good folks.  I can’t think of who in the area would have the early stuff...I could check the GSC roster, but I need to head out for the evening soon.  

 

There’s a lot of wisdom here with respect to these cars.  Feel free to take advantage of it.

 

Sunday May 12 is the date for the local swap meet in Winnipeg, although there isn’t much early stuff nor necessarily Buick stuff.

 

Take care and enjoy the journey.

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi Sarge. I am looking for an E-35 Buick. Wondering what your intentions are with the new purchase. I would like a chance at it if you decide to sell it. Located in Alberta. Probably 1000 miles away but it could be worse!  Ed

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  • 1 year later...
23 hours ago, Larry Schramm said:

 

Sarge

Did you get your car running?

No not yet.  Been taking my time. Mainly just haven't had time lol.  I'll get it going this sping tho. I hope lol

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